Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Video card crashing


  • Please log in to reply
8 replies to this topic

#1 balalaika0

balalaika0

  • Members
  • 5 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:12:03 PM

Posted 09 July 2017 - 10:20 AM

I've been having this issue for a few months now, and it seems to be getting worse.

 

My monitor will suddenly go black and my audio will begin to skip/loop for maybe 5-7 seconds, and then carry on normally (but my monitor will still be black with a "no input" message on the screen).  I can still type, hear audio, etc. so it seems to be purely a video problem.

 

My first thought was that the graphics card was becoming unseated, so I took it out and reseated firmly, tightened all screws, etc.  No dice; the problem continued.  Next I took out the card and disassembled it so that I could properly remove all dust with a compressed air canister.  I also removed the old thermal paste under the heat sink and applied a fresh coating.  This, too, was to no avail.

 

The problem used to only occur while gaming so I assumed the graphics processor was being overloaded/overheated, but it's gotten to the point where it will sometimes happen immediately upon system start, so I'm not so sure anymore that it's not a PSU issue or something related to voltage etc.  As a result, I'm unclear on my next steps.

 

Computer specs below (built myself in Dec 2014); attached is a screenshot from HWMonitor.  Bear in mind that the HWMonitor screenshot was taken with only my browser running (no games).  While playing games I have seen the video card temp exceed 80°C.  Can post more shots if needed or any other specs that would be helpful in diagnosis.  Would appreciate any thoughts/suggestions - thanks in advance.

 

Power Supply:
Motherboard:
Memory:
Video Card:
Monitor:                       AOC G2460PQU 24" 144hz 1ms
 

 

Attached Files



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 balalaika0

balalaika0
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 5 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:12:03 PM

Posted 09 July 2017 - 10:24 AM

OP again.  To add, I don't do any overclocking and actually downloaded MSI Afterburner to try underclocking, but this didn't seem to help the problem either.  Also might be worth mentioning that after each crash, I gently touch the video card to feel how hot it is, and it's usually very hot to the touch - but unsure if this is abnormal as I obviously hadn't thought to do this back when I was having no issues.

 

Thanks again.



#3 dc3

dc3

    Bleeping Treehugger


  • Members
  • 30,612 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sierra Foothills of Northern Ca.
  • Local time:09:03 AM

Posted 09 July 2017 - 03:05 PM

While running a game please do the following.

 

Please download and install Speccy to provide us with information about your computer.  Clicking on this link will automatically initiate the download.

The one piece of information the Speccy will not provide is the make and model of your PSU.  If you know what it is please post this along with the Speccy link which will be generated.

When Speccy opens Click on File which is in the upper left portion of the screen, then click on Publish Snapshot.

In the following screen click on Copy to Clipboard.

 In your next post right click inside the Reply to Topic box, then click on Paste.  This will load a link to the Speccy log.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#4 balalaika0

balalaika0
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 5 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:12:03 PM

Posted 09 July 2017 - 03:32 PM

While running a game please do the following.

 

Please download and install Speccy to provide us with information about your computer.  Clicking on this link will automatically initiate the download.

The one piece of information the Speccy will not provide is the make and model of your PSU.  If you know what it is please post this along with the Speccy link which will be generated.

When Speccy opens Click on File which is in the upper left portion of the screen, then click on Publish Snapshot.

In the following screen click on Copy to Clipboard.

 In your next post right click inside the Reply to Topic box, then click on Paste.  This will load a link to the Speccy log.

 

Thank you.  Will do this tonight and report back.



#5 balalaika0

balalaika0
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 5 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:12:03 PM

Posted 09 July 2017 - 08:22 PM

PSU:  CORSAIR CX-M series CX600M 600W 80 PLUS BRONZE Active PFC ATX12V & EPS12V Modular Power Supply

 

Speccy (without game running): http://speccy.piriform.com/results/IPnqXQe4oBnb2vPVKlTn4eK

Speccy (with game running): http://speccy.piriform.com/results/Y1D3RGlYM36lFGuWlm88xsB


Edited by balalaika0, 09 July 2017 - 08:52 PM.


#6 dc3

dc3

    Bleeping Treehugger


  • Members
  • 30,612 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sierra Foothills of Northern Ca.
  • Local time:09:03 AM

Posted 10 July 2017 - 09:05 AM

The second Speccy with the game running wasn't completed properly, the link wasn't created.

 

Looking at the voltages I'm now concerned about your PSU.

 

+3.3V = 1.980 V
+5V =    3.387 V
+12V =  0.048 V

 

Please download and run CPUID's HWMonitor.  Post a screenshot or a snipping tool image of the voltages in your topic.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#7 balalaika0

balalaika0
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 5 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:12:03 PM

Posted 10 July 2017 - 10:42 PM

Sorry, try this one:  http://speccy.piriform.com/results/sR1FluQu5dtrM5TBHyDoAEO

 

HWMonitor screenshots:

 

 

Attached Files


Edited by balalaika0, 10 July 2017 - 10:44 PM.


#8 jonuk76

jonuk76

  • Members
  • 2,178 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Wales, UK
  • Local time:05:03 PM

Posted 11 July 2017 - 07:58 AM

Just as a note of caution regarding the voltages reported by Speccy, HWMonitor, or any other software, is that sometimes they are just wrong.  They don't read all of the output from the system monitoring chip correctly.  If the 12v PSU output was really less than a volt, you wouldn't have a working system - I can guarantee that!!

 

I've a similar era motherboard from the same manufacturer, and also get garbage motherboard voltages reported...  The figures displayed by Gigabytes own System Information Viewer software make a lot more sense.  The other sure fire way to measure PSU voltages is carefully(!), with a multimeter, on the plugs themselves.

 

Screenshot from my own system (currently stable) showing the same issue with reported voltages:

 

PxjAtT1.png

 

While here is the output from Gigabyte SIV (system idling, hence low clock speed showing)

 

3KLN5Gl.png


Edited by jonuk76, 11 July 2017 - 08:11 AM.

7sbvuf-6.png


#9 dc3

dc3

    Bleeping Treehugger


  • Members
  • 30,612 posts
  • ONLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Sierra Foothills of Northern Ca.
  • Local time:09:03 AM

Posted 11 July 2017 - 09:14 AM

Just as a note of caution regarding the voltages reported by Speccy, HWMonitor, or any other software, is that sometimes they are just wrong.  They don't read all of the output from the system monitoring chip correctly.  If the 12v PSU output was really less than a volt, you wouldn't have a working system - I can guarantee that!!

 

I've a similar era motherboard from the same manufacturer, and also get garbage motherboard voltages reported...  The figures displayed by Gigabytes own System Information Viewer software make a lot more sense.  The other sure fire way to measure PSU voltages is carefully(!), with a multimeter, on the plugs themselves.

 

I agree that the best way to read the rail voltages is with a volt or a mulitimeter.  But to get an accurate reading you need to put a load on the rails being read.  Playing a game or recording a DVD will usually provide an adequate load.   A second option would be to use a PSU voltage tester.  There are inexpensive testers which work on the pass / fail principal.  But there are more sophisticated testers which will actually show the rail voltages.  Both of these are plugged into the PSU 24-pin connector which is attached to the motherboard.

 

The problem with using programs previously mentioned is that the voltage sensors are imprecise at best.  But if you are going to depend on these readings you should read the voltages found in the BIOS.  One of the problems with programs like this is that when they search for certain rail voltages the rail being sought may not be found and another rail could be read  providing erroneous voltages.  When the BIOS reads these voltages at least they get the correct rail voltages being read.

 

There is a good article at the Overclock website which explains this quite well. 


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 





0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users