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Cryptolock I ran into


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#1 gorship

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Posted 05 July 2017 - 12:43 PM

Searching for more information + wanted to give a heads up for you to pass on to your clients/friends/family.

Im new to joining bleepingcomputer but have always enjoyed the quality of information:

I am sure this will probably be redundant and not nearly as thorough as it could but, its the first time I have really had to deal with a crypted computer (dealt with other virus removals before mind you) and I thought I would at least share what I found. Hopefully it's of some use.

Source:

 

The source was a fraud UPS Email with a zip file attached:

http://imgur.com/t8o1gmB
(picture  kept breaking when trying to embed)


The client had removed some files aready to I couldn't find any "branding" or splash screen asking for money.

Ransom Note:
I did find the ransom note in the recycle bin. 

read very much like .crypted shown below but with minor changes:

"ATTENTION!


All your documents, photos, databases and other important personal files were encrypted using strong RSA-1024 algorithm with a unique key. To restore your files you have to pay 0.60358 BTC (bitcoins).


1. Create Bitcoin wallet here:

<removed link>
2. Buy 0.60358 BTC with cash, using search here:

<removed link>
3. Send 0.60358 BTC to this Bitcoin address:
-

4. Open one of the following links in your browser to download decryptor:
-

5. Run decryptor to restore your files."
 

 

There was no "calling card" as I call it, all the files looked as they would normally with no renaming done to file or file type

Mbam Results:

 

Clients computer was full of all sorts of malware, however, there was a rootkit and trojan called Fileless.MTGEN  (which from what I read is quite generic)
 

%appdata% (local, and roaming in particular) had a bunch of files to clear out.


Anyway, if you have dealt with a similar crypt, I would be curious if you know the name of it and if there is a decrypt key for it out there for future knowledge. 

 


Edited by gorship, 05 July 2017 - 12:44 PM.


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#2 quietman7

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Posted 05 July 2017 - 02:07 PM


The best way to identify the different ransomwares is the ransom note (including it's name), samples of the encrypted files, any obvious extensions appended to the encrypted files, information related to any email addresses used by the cyber-criminals to request payment and the malware file responsible for the infection.

You can submit samples of encrypted files and ransom notes to ID Ransomware for assistance with identification and confirmation. This is a service that helps identify what ransomware may have encrypted your files and then attempts to direct you to an appropriate support topic where you can seek further assistance. Uploading both encrypted files and ransom notes together provides a more positive match and helps to avoid false detections. If ID Ransomware cannot identify the infection, you can post the case SHA1 it gives you in your next reply for Demonslay335 to manually inspect the files.

Example screenshot:
2016-07-01_0936.png
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#3 gorship

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Posted 05 July 2017 - 04:01 PM

Hey quietman! 

Appreciate the low down, I did try the ID tool you mentioned; unfortunately, it couldn't ID it for me. When I tried to upload the ransom note file itself the website timed out on upload - if I just tried to use the file I got the "unable to determine" error. If I run into one again and I get the same error ill post the SHA1 information. Past that point now and just moving into finding important files and rolling them back (luckily client has that option checked and we're able to do it). The computer is all clean now and client learned the hard way about inspecting where emails come from. 

PS. That tool is really something. Many thanks to Demonslay for putting that together.

Thanks again,
Gorship.



#4 quietman7

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Posted 05 July 2017 - 04:29 PM

You're welcome on behalf of the Bleeping Computer community.
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