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Why there is some (expensive) non-famous apps that can be cracked, while the mos


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#1 Abdulmalek97

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Posted 04 July 2017 - 03:57 AM

Some expensive PC apps (costs like +500€) can't be cracked ( according to a lot of hackers). While on the other hand, famous ones or even systems (windows, office, internet downloads manger and even anti-virus are always hacked and cracked) ?

Any good explanation for this?


Edited by Abdulmalek97, 04 July 2017 - 03:58 AM.


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#2 frogbreath

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Posted 04 July 2017 - 04:14 AM

If you dam a stream up water will find it's own way round the same applies to people who want something for nothing. The out come for both is destructive in it's final result.



#3 MDD1963

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Posted 04 July 2017 - 05:08 AM

Spend much time worrying/theorizing about software 'cracks', do we...? :)


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#4 quietman7

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Posted 04 July 2017 - 07:34 AM

The practice of using keygens, cracking tools, warez, torrents or any pirated software is not only considered illegal activity but it is a security risk which can make your system susceptible to a smörgåsbord of malware infections, remote attacks, exposure of personal information, and identity theft. Please read this topic...When you use these kind of programs, be forewarned that some of the most aggressive types of malware infections can be contracted and spread by visiting crack, keygen, warez and other pirated software sites.

Using these types of programs or the websites visited to get them is a guaranteed way to get yourself infected!!
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#5 Abdulmalek97

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Posted 04 July 2017 - 09:25 AM

Jesus. Can't someone just provide me with a logical answer? And I am not asking for them and definitely don't use them. just curious. 



#6 quietman7

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Posted 04 July 2017 - 03:08 PM

To be honest, I'm not exactly sure. If I knew, I would have provided a direct answer as I'm not one known for dodging questions. My best guess would be that some programs and operating systems are just easier for hackers to target while others are not. Another, reason I suspect is related to cost considerations.
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#7 britechguy

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Posted 04 July 2017 - 04:28 PM

There is nothing that "can't be cracked" if someone has enough time and is willing to expend enough effort to do it.  Or at least for every "uncrackable" thing that's come down the pike since I started in this business in the mid-1980s someone has found a way to crack it.   Mind you, it's becoming more and more difficult as the security folks pay attention to what's been compromised and how, and not only invent things to guard against those but permutations of those that they come up with themselves (and most often do not publicize).

 

However, quietman7 has said something I've been saying for a very long time in a slightly different way.  Hacking is all about cost/benefit analysis, where both cost and benefit may or may not involve any financial component.   A great deal of hacking is done for nothing more than bragging rights, though a significant amount is, of course, nefarious.   The way it's nefarious varies from just destroying someone's data for giggles or to trying to extract money, as the latest spate of ransomware attacks that have been much in the news lately demonstrate.

 

There are certain instances where the costs and/or effort are just too high and the benefit or effect is too low.   How either of those is determined lies solely with the individual doing the determining.  You don't see nearly as much hacking on, say, Linux or MacOS, as you do on Windows simply because the payoff under either of those two OSes is orders of magnitude smaller than for the ultra target rich world of Windows.  And that's whether the payoff is bragging rights or monetary (or both).


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#8 jwoods301

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Posted 04 July 2017 - 04:32 PM

If you dam a stream up water will find it's own way round the same applies to people who want something for nothing. The out come for both is destructive in it's final result.

 

Well said.



#9 Abdulmalek97

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Posted 05 July 2017 - 03:33 AM

There is nothing that "can't be cracked" if someone has enough time and is willing to expend enough effort to do it.  Or at least for every "uncrackable" thing that's come down the pike since I started in this business in the mid-1980s someone has found a way to crack it.   Mind you, it's becoming more and more difficult as the security folks pay attention to what's been compromised and how, and not only invent things to guard against those but permutations of those that they come up with themselves (and most often do not publicize).

 

However, quietman7 has said something I've been saying for a very long time in a slightly different way.  Hacking is all about cost/benefit analysis, where both cost and benefit may or may not involve any financial component.   A great deal of hacking is done for nothing more than bragging rights, though a significant amount is, of course, nefarious.   The way it's nefarious varies from just destroying someone's data for giggles or to trying to extract money, as the latest spate of ransomware attacks that have been much in the news lately demonstrate.

 

There are certain instances where the costs and/or effort are just too high and the benefit or effect is too low.   How either of those is determined lies solely with the individual doing the determining.  You don't see nearly as much hacking on, say, Linux or MacOS, as you do on Windows simply because the payoff under either of those two OSes is orders of magnitude smaller than for the ultra target rich world of Windows.  And that's whether the payoff is bragging rights or monetary (or both).

 

Thanks for your well explained response.



#10 quietman7

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Posted 05 July 2017 - 05:27 AM

Expanding on what has already been said about hacking in general...Hackers come from different age groups, backgrounds, countries, education and skill levels...with varying motivations and intents. Many cyber-criminals today treat hacking as a business venture for financial gain while "script kiddies" typically do it for the thrill and boosting a reputation as being a hacker among their peers. Others hack for nefarious and destructive purposes while some believe they are doing something good. Below are a few articles which attempt to explain who these individuals are and why they do what they do.
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#11 NickAu

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Posted 05 July 2017 - 06:02 AM

 

There is nothing that "can't be cracked" if someone has enough time and is willing to expend enough effort to do it.

Exactly.

 

You don't see nearly as much hacking on, say, Linux

Most Linux users are more computer savvy and security conscious than the average mum and dad Windows PC user.
 
Because of the way Linux is built and its permissions, ( most of the time you don't run as root )

 

 Most of the software in the repos ( repositories ) is free last count there are about 70 000 bits of software in the Ubuntu repo alone and they are all clean, if a Linux user enables their firewall, practices good browser security, and only gets software from the official repo their chances of getting infected or hacked are virtually non existent.

 

And it gets even harder with specialty distros like Puppy Linux, Xenial pup because when these are run live from CD or frugally installed..... Well good luck with that.

 

It could also have something to do with the fact that the top 17 " hacking based" operating systems are Linux, LOL.


Edited by NickAu, 05 July 2017 - 06:26 AM.


#12 britechguy

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Posted 05 July 2017 - 10:07 AM

 

 

There is nothing that "can't be cracked" if someone has enough time and is willing to expend enough effort to do it.

Exactly.

 

You don't see nearly as much hacking on, say, Linux

Most Linux users are more computer savvy and security conscious than the average mum and dad Windows PC user.
 
Because of the way Linux is built and its permissions, ( most of the time you don't run as root )

 

 Most of the software in the repos ( repositories ) is free last count there are about 70 000 bits of software in the Ubuntu repo alone and they are all clean, if a Linux user enables their firewall, practices good browser security, and only gets software from the official repo their chances of getting infected or hacked are virtually non existent.

 

And it gets even harder with specialty distros like Puppy Linux, Xenial pup because when these are run live from CD or frugally installed..... Well good luck with that.

 

It could also have something to do with the fact that the top 17 " hacking based" operating systems are Linux, LOL.

 

 

 

Not that I don't agree with all that you've said with regard to Linux, because I do, but the idea of  "Fortress Linux" is a myth.   There have been security issues that have been exploited, just not nearly so many nor as often as Windows.

 

You did, after all, elect to reply, "Exactly," to my observation that anything can be hacked/cracked with sufficient time, effort, and motivation.

 

I suspect that as Linux continues its march as the OS of choice for machines in data centers, what I'd call the "backbone of cyberspace," that there is going to arise a contingent of ne'er do wells who are going to dedicate a lot of their time and effort to compromising them.   I have little doubt that they'll eventually succeed, either.  I've been around this block a few too many times to think otherwise;  it will just take significantly more effort and creativity.


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