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Sudden hard drive failure on laptop?


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#1 TOMIS13LACK

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Posted 29 June 2017 - 04:18 PM

On a Dell Inspiron 15 5755. There were no signs of a failing hard drive that i have noticed. I was updating drivers (graphics) and then it bluescreened. Now when i start it, Dell Support Assist gives the error "Hard Drive - Not Installed." The computer boots fine with other hard drives and everything. Did the hard drive just fail? Is it completely trash or is there any hope for it?


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#2 britechguy

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Posted 29 June 2017 - 04:24 PM

Well, if the computer boots with other hard drives that gives you a very strong data point that something's wrong with the one you're asking about.

 

You can always download Seagate's SeaTools for Windows and use it to check that hard drive if you have the cable to connect it as an external drive or an external drive case that allows you to do the same.  Realize, though, that depending on what the mechanism of failure is that every attempt to access the drive, even to determine what's wrong, could bring the drive closer to complete failure.  This is worth considering if you have data on it that you really, really need to get back.

 

P.S. SeaTools works on all brands of hard drives, not just Seagate drives.


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#3 ranchhand_

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Posted 29 June 2017 - 04:50 PM

Just as an afterthought, if you cannot boot into Windows, you can use the Seatools for DOS utility at the same link Britechguy supplied; it runs virtual from the CD and by-passes the hard drive entirely.


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#4 JoelMiles925

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Posted 03 July 2017 - 06:19 PM

I had this issue myself less than a week ago on my secondary laptop as it happens. Took it to a technician and as I expected the hard drive had completely failed. 

 

Sorry, it does indeed sound like a common HDD failure. 



#5 Kilroy

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Posted 04 July 2017 - 02:40 PM

If there is anything important on the drive I recommend you try pulling the data before you try doing anything else to it.



#6 britechguy

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Posted 04 July 2017 - 04:00 PM

There are those who will argue that the first thing you should do, if you have the equipment handy or are willing to rush out and buy it, is to clone the hard drive suspected of failing and then you have all your existing data, etc.   Realistically speaking, many home users are not going to have a spare drive hanging around nor be inclined to rush out and buy one.   If you already have an external backup drive and have been taking regular system image backups then this is not quite so necessary, as you can restore from the latest of those.

 

If you don't have an extant backup, whether system image or user data, on an external drive (or media of some sort) and you don't intend to get a spare drive for cloning then you should extract your user data first on to the external media of your choice.

 

A drive could go completely belly-up at any time when you're extracting data, cloning, or running a diagnostic and it's critical that you do what you can to preserve your data prior to doing anything else.

 

A great deal of your decision making process will be based around how precious the data that's on that drive really is.  If it's disposable or backed up then you can pretty much have at it as far as running diagnostics.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.  Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.

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