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High CPU usage and temperature after cleaning


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#1 WigsXL

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Posted 23 June 2017 - 12:05 PM

My CPU usage is unusually high since I cleared all the dust out from my case (there was a lot). Just opening any web page consistently shoots it up to between 25-45% and while this happens the fan gets much louder, louder than it used to go even when running intensive games. Also the fan becomes extremely loud when booting up. I've also noticed heavy screen tearing when scrolling, but not all the time.

The problem started immediately after the clean out so it seems something went wrong there, the only thing I can think of is that I tightened one of four big screw type things (sorry I'm not very knowledgeable about this) that were underneath the CPU because it was looser than the other three but I don't see how that could have caused any problems.

HWMonitor says my CPU fan is jumping all around between 1300 and 1340 rpm at idle and then jumping up to anywhere between 1600 and 2100 rpm when opening a web page and then quickly returning to idle levels. MSI Afterburner is showing the temperature shooting up from around 44C at idle to 55-65C while a web page is opening and then dropping right back down to idle levels like the rpm. It seems like doing absolutely anything on my pc causes the CPU temp and fan to spike.

My CPU is an i5 2500k and I'm on Windows 10, thanks in advance and let me know if there is any more useful information I can give.



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#2 britechguy

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Posted 23 June 2017 - 04:49 PM

Well, if your temperatures are markedly different than they had been my SWAG is that when you tightened down whatever it was you tightened that you compromised the thermal paste.  When this stuff is applied it's much like denture paste in that it fills in gaps between the CPU and the heat sink (which are minute) and keeps these things in "perfect" contact.  But, over time, it hardens, so if you cause it to flex too much you can essentially pop the seal apart, or partially compromise it.

 

Your temperatures are not concerning, per se, given the maximum operating temperature for this CPU:

 

                   http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/Core_i5/Intel-Core%20i5-2500K%20CM8062300833803.html 

 

But because you're seeing a marked change in behavior I suspect the thermal paste has been compromised, but that's just a suspicion and I have no way to verify it.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#3 mjd420nova

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Posted 23 June 2017 - 05:03 PM

Another fault that seems to appear often after cleaning is the memory cards pick up a little dust in the connectors.  Reseating the memory could solve the problem.  I have seen the thermal paste do this too, as mentioned but unless the heatsink/fan assembly got moved it might not be the cause.  Depending on how old the unit is, since the original thermal paste applied at the factory doesn't last past three years  and becomes a bit crusty and hardened.



#4 britechguy

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Posted 23 June 2017 - 05:11 PM

since the original thermal paste applied at the factory doesn't last past three years  and becomes a bit crusty and hardened.

 

I really hate when I see this repeated, because the statement is just too broad.   I'll go with the "becomes crusty and hardened" but if it remains undisturbed it can continue functioning as intended virtually indefinitely.

 

I have never replaced the thermal paste on any system I've owned, and many of these have been in active use for a decade, sometimes longer.  I've still got a laptop from the Windows XP era, with Windows XP on it, that always "ran hot" (as in you can really feel the heat at the exhaust and could from day one) and is still running.   I don't use it at all anymore, but it's with a friend who uses some ancient software related to Jaguar motorcars that's installed on it.

 

Thermal paste failure is most frequently the direct result of things that shouldn't be disturbed being disturbed.  Vacuuming out dust bunnies or blowing them out has never caused a thermal paste failure that I'm aware of.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#5 WigsXL

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Posted 23 June 2017 - 07:35 PM

Well, if your temperatures are markedly different than they had been my SWAG is that when you tightened down whatever it was you tightened that you compromised the thermal paste.  When this stuff is applied it's much like denture paste in that it fills in gaps between the CPU and the heat sink (which are minute) and keeps these things in "perfect" contact.  But, over time, it hardens, so if you cause it to flex too much you can essentially pop the seal apart, or partially compromise it.

 

Your temperatures are not concerning, per se, given the maximum operating temperature for this CPU:

 

                   http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/Core_i5/Intel-Core%20i5-2500K%20CM8062300833803.html 

 

But because you're seeing a marked change in behavior I suspect the thermal paste has been compromised, but that's just a suspicion and I have no way to verify it.

The thermal paste appears to be the most likely problem, thanks for your help

Another fault that seems to appear often after cleaning is the memory cards pick up a little dust in the connectors.  Reseating the memory could solve the problem.  I have seen the thermal paste do this too, as mentioned but unless the heatsink/fan assembly got moved it might not be the cause.  Depending on how old the unit is, since the original thermal paste applied at the factory doesn't last past three years  and becomes a bit crusty and hardened.

When you say memory cards are you taking about the RAM?



#6 mjd420nova

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Posted 24 June 2017 - 09:28 AM

Yes, the RAM is usually mounted in slots that can collect dust too.






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