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Nvidia Setup


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#1 stech17

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Posted 23 June 2017 - 09:02 AM

Fairly new to Linux and I'm trying to see if I can get better mining hashrate then through Windows. However, can't seem to get GTX1070s working no matter how many guides I follow online. Don't mind which Linux build I have to use/ download. Any help appreciated.



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#2 MadmanRB

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Posted 23 June 2017 - 09:38 AM

Well Nvidia does work in linux quite well.

I will suggest my usual suggestion for most new users, try mint as it is very good at driver support.

I have a GTX 1060 and it works just fine


Edited by MadmanRB, 23 June 2017 - 09:38 AM.

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#3 GoofProg

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Posted 25 June 2017 - 05:21 PM

If you are using an Ubuntu related distro then you can get drivers from the additional drivers tool.  You can go the other route and download the linux drivers from nvidia's site but installing them is a chore because you have to install them in single user mode.


Edited by GoofProg, 25 June 2017 - 05:22 PM.


#4 stech17

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Posted 28 June 2017 - 04:09 AM

Thanks, I'll try both though I've had issues with Ubuntu previously.



#5 cat1092

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Posted 29 June 2017 - 04:34 AM

Nick created a Topic dedicated to installing NVIDIA drivers on LInux distros, which I'll link here, involves adding a simple PPA & updating, then select the lastest offered NVIDIA driver. Both of my EVGA GeForce (6GB GDDR5) GTX 1060 SSC & FTW + ACX 3.0 cards are running great with Linux Mint, which is based from Ubuntu, so it should look & perform equally as good. It's a royal pain in the backside to install the drivers downloaded from NVIDIA, even they suggest to use the PPA where available. :)

 

Here's the Topic!

 

https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/549534/nvidia-drivers-how-to-install-it-in-ubuntu/?hl=+nvidia%20+drivers

 

Here's another site that basically suggests the same. 

 

https://www.howtogeek.com/242045/how-to-get-the-latest-nvidia-amd-or-intel-graphics-drivers-on-ubuntu/

 

NVIDIA cards on Linux are no issue, it's AMD ones that are for now, as they've refused to release newer drivers for their cards for Linux users on Ubuntu 16.04 onwards, while have been as of late, been proving lots of Windows ones. There's no PPA as of the moment, so are stuck with open source drivers, which really aren't that bad, would be nice to have a true Catalyst Control Center. Am not 100% sure because I no longer have Mint 17 installed, it may be that Ubuntu 14.04 has true AMD drivers. 

 

Although the point here are NVIDIA drivers & added the above for comparison only, NVIDIA is the dominator (or should I say the Intimidator) of GPU's & GDDR6 cards are on the way next year, so any gain by AMD come December (that month is when Apple will release a new PC with the latest AMD cards) will be short lived. & NVIDIA once again will reign for two more years. :thumbsup:

 

Good Luck with your GTX 1070, these are excellent cards, capable of 8K display (as are the 1060 models), I last tried to install Linux Mint 18 on mine (EVGA GeForce GTX 1070 FTW + ACX 3.0 cooling) last year when purchased, didn't have a 4K monitor at that time, what it seemed to be looking for, as there was a warning bouncing from corner to corner that stated 'Out of Range'. Meaning on a 1080p monitor, there may be no display, even though there is on Windows. There wasn't much choice in the Recovery options to assist, so I assume that oner has to first install any onboard graphics (remove the card to do so) & then try again with the 1070. I cannot promise that the 1070 will run on a 1080p monitor, as after a couple of weeks & little assistance was getting nowhere. Plus surely wasn't going to be formatting my 512GiB Samsung 950 PRO NVMe SSD time & time again over the error, so said the heck with it & went for the pair of GTX 1060's. :)

 

Should you get Ubuntu successfully installed, please let us know how you did within this Topic & shoot me a PM with a link the Topic, I have an extra 120GiB SSD that needs a home (no more Linux Mint on costly NVMe SSD's for me), the older SSD will be fast enough & not introduce issues to my best NVMe SSD, although there was Linux support for these long before Windows, beginning in 2012 with Ubuntu 12.04/Linux Mint 17 LTS releases. 

 

Unfortunately, the same (so far) can't be stated with Ubuntu 16.04/Linux Mint 18 LTS & NVIDIA 1070 GPU's on 1080p monitors. Will most likely need a 2K (1440p or 4K (2180p) monitor, I'll have to try booting from my Live media now that I have 4K & see how things goes with the 1070, previously even the Live media wouldn't show on my ASUS VE248 1080p monitor, other than the error mentioned above. Although what I don't have is a 2x more costly 2K monitor (doesn't make sense that half the pixels costs that much, should be much less) to install Linux Mint on & likely won't have one, unless pricing falls to half that of 4K, which would place it just above premium 1080p monitors at a reasonable price.

 

I very much look forward to any solution you come up with, although now feel that my newly acquired monitor will work fine with the GTX 1070 I've had for well over a year. :)

 

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#6 rufwoof

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Posted 01 July 2017 - 07:16 AM

I've recently switched over from Linux to FreeBSD as my primary boot choice and my GT8600 Nvidia card works great with that (nvidia and FreeBSD generally seem to work well together).

 

Scanning around however and your card looks like it might be one of the more fiddly to install

 

https://forums.freebsd.org/threads/56948/#post-324316

 

For me, I just downloaded and extracted the kernel src tarball, installed the appropriate nvidia driver (340 in my case) and ran the instructions https://docs.freebsd.org/doc/7.3-RELEASE/usr/share/doc/en/articles/compiz-fusion/nvidia-setup.html .... and I was up and running with BSD/MATE in no time.

 

I really like Beastie (BSD). Things are more consistent (Linux tends to move things around over time) and its really solid. The downside is that it supports less hardware, but when your hardware is supported its a great desktop choice IMO.

 

Mostly I've used pkg to install everything other than the nvidia. Which is similar to apt-get. i.e. I installed the base system and then just pkg install xorg mate mate-desktop ..... etc. I use a 32" TV as a monitor and it has the best quality fonts/look I've seen so far (and I've used a very wide range of Linux choices).


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#7 synergy513

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Posted 01 July 2017 - 11:52 PM

mint 18 32 bit sees my gtx 460 easy peasy. just recently loaded a different linux mint  32 bit unit with  a 5850 and  no issues to report . the deal is this. mint will see the hardware  for sure, and then load generic  drivers that work fine for most users, software manager will lead you in the right PPA direction also if need be.  i would only recommend using the Nvidia/AMD designated drivers from their respective site if the results are less than desirable with what the OS deems appropriate.

 

 One thing i have been reading about, is that the proprietary drivers are causing malaise when configuring multiple monitors. users are reverting back to the PPA editions, it looks like and getting it done that way.


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#8 cat1092

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Posted 02 July 2017 - 04:46 AM

While both of my 1060 plus a 960 card will run on Linux Mint fine, the 1070 still eludes me, tried with a USB stick using persistence mode to save changes between boots. 

 

Still am getting that screen with the warning on a 1080p monitor, while it works fine on the 4K one (may also work on 2K, I don't have one to test with & likely won't unless gifted to me), the 1070 upwards are different beasts than the lower cost & more popular 1060 models. As well as those having earlier cards that still are in perfect working order, an air duster plus a nice cleanup/repasting goes a long ways towards lifespan, keeping the card running cool isn't an option here. 

 

 

 

mint 18 32 bit sees my gtx 460 easy peasy

 

synergy513, this is one of the Fermi cards, isn't it? If so, a good one, and a clean install of Mint 18 will load a compatible driver, although the recommended proprietary has to be enabled after boot with Driver Manager. Oddly shows as recommended highlighted in green, yet that dang nouveau driver loads instead, the install of that (one of the 375.xx drivers was recommended, not those for the 960/1060 series), plus any AMD/Intel microcode requires a reboot. 

 

I also like the fact that a PPA is no longer needed with Mint 18 for NVIDIA drivers, these can be selected from the Driver manager, and in the Administrative tools, there'll be a NVIDIA settings option, where we can choose which power mode desired, by default, adaptive was chosen on mine, although chose Performance instead to get the most bang from my cards. 

 

BTW, the 1070 onwards are true beasts, I wouldn't take today what was given for mine last year, as pricing has hiked for this series, today I could purchase two 1060 cards for the asking price of one (around $579), the 1070 goes for even more, that one cost $429 new, once dipped down to $409, rose & never dropped in price again. Now out of stock & the rest of the options on the page are way overpriced, above that of the Founder's Edition. 

 

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?item=N82E16814487259

 

Only select 1080 versions are a value now, this a a nice FTW + ACX 3.0 cooling version for the price today.

 

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?item=N82E16814487245

 

I'll take a pass on the upcoming 'rehash' of today's cards, am awaiting & saving for next year's offerings, which by reports, will include GDDR6 memory & more of it than today's 3-11GB offerings. We'll see GPU's offering 20GB in the next few years at both NVIDIA & AMD's growth rates, that & the bus are what separates the good ones from the garbage. :lol:

 

BTW, whatever happened to 512 bit graphics cards? I did see an AMD one not too long back, nothing close to that with NVIDIA. Used to be 512 bit was a common performance GPU. 

 

Hopefully the OP has found an answer from our suggestions, most of those who has the 1070 loves these cards, 8GB GDDR5 for $429 was a steal compared to 2015, when the top line cards were usually 4GB & at a steeper cost, actually 2x the price, as many 970/980/980Ti owners found out way too late. By chance, except for the few 1080's left at a reasonable price above (I'd had purchased that one at the time of the 1070, had it been that price), the 10 series line is in essence over, except for the clearance of the leftovers. 

 

Don't fall for the upcoming release, as it's not truly a 'full' release, not like the 1080 was compared to the 980, more of an upgraded 10 series card, many had lots of real estate left on the board for future upgrading by NVIDIA, who in turn sells the boards to their partner vendors after a Founder's Edition launch. Please don't be fooled by 1050 through 2080 editions, these will be an overpriced 'transitional release' just to make more profit from boards already in the hands of tens (if not hundreds) of millions of consumers, and the real release in the sense of one built from the ground up will be in 2018 with DDR6 memory, which the current board can't support. 

 

Although I give NVIDIA credit where due, this was a planned release all along in two phases, the 10 series & 20 on the same board, a marketing success & the one who came up with the idea deserves a well earned promotion, as the suckers dives into what they'll think to be new releases. Think about it for a moment, the 9GB 1060 'FE' never happened & 1070 wasn't on the drawing board. although there is a 1080 one. Seems like NVIDIA is targeting the upper & lower tiers more so than the middle of the pack (other than the 960/1060), the mainstream consumers & hopefully that'll change for the better. :)

 

As far as Linux & large GPU's goes, my only suggestion is a monitor upgrade, the only thing that so far, has worked for me in testing only. I won't be installing Linux Mint on this PC, so won't be reaping the benefits. 

 

Cat


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#9 synergy513

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Posted 02 July 2017 - 05:30 PM

Yes, the 460 is an old fermi card, enough 3d potency for my needs ..and compatible with all three 32bit OSs loaded in the unit  Yes, the driver manager, not the software manager.

 

  strangely enough, as the newer generations keep improving, so do the demands like 4k and such. makes one wonder what is around the corner.


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#10 cat1092

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Posted 02 July 2017 - 09:06 PM

Fairly new to Linux and I'm trying to see if I can get better mining hashrate then through Windows. However, can't seem to get GTX1070s working no matter how many guides I follow online. Don't mind which Linux build I have to use/ download. Any help appreciated.

 

My friend, with your powerful GPU, unless you have a better than 1080p monitor, forget it. I tried to get assistance here, elsewhere & Googled on my own prior to that, all to no avail. 

 

The PC build was one I initially done for a Linux Mint PC, has became a Windows 10 one instead, here's the Topic where built, all that I added since was DDR3-2400MHz RAM (running in XMP Mode #1) & a 28" Samsung U28E510D from Costco, actually a remodeled UE510 w/out any changes for major retailers for $100 less than on their site at $399.99. I paid $299.99, had I been looking last Black Friday (2016), could had snagged it for $224.99 after instant $75 coupon, had the flyer & never knew it was in there, because at the time had spent a lot of cash & felt that a decent one would be a minimum of $600, wow as I wrong, would had jumped all over it last year. 

 

BTW, here's the Topic in regards to what was going to be a Linux Mint PC. 

 

https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/623458/new-pc-build-with-linux-mint-18-ideas-apreciated/

 

Had there been more input in the Topic rather than cheerleading, I may had been made aware that DDR3-2400 RAM would scream compared to DDR3-1600 for the same price, actually $10 less per set on promo when I purchased four kits, two for the PC above & the other two in it's 'little brother', that was later built, which features the smaller of the two Devil's Canyon CPU's in the i5-4690K, which with a few clicks, runs faster than the 4790K at stock, all cores are synced at x44 to run at 4.4GHz (constant frequency). Plus upgraded cooling for both were never suggested for that first build, why the constant throttling of the CPU when running stress tests/benchmarks & therefore costing me points huge. 

 

Yet I lived through it & learned, even with Linux Mint not wanting to run after I installed the 1070 GPU, ran fine with the Intel HD 4600 graphics, installed the drivers via PPA before the card, so that all would be ready, wow did I get fooled when booting into Linux Mint after installing it. :P

 

Just as you, never overcame the issue, so with my second build with the i5-4690K mentioned above, purchased a EVGA 6GB GTX 1060 FTW + ACX 3.0 cooling (similar to the GTX 1070), and all worked out perfectly on a 1080p monitor (now also on the 4K one). I have one more 4K port left (HDMI 1.4 @ 30Hz), so will have to decide which build I want to place on the slower port, although for Web browsing, will be fine, so most likely my upgraded XPS 8700 with the EVGA 6GB GTX 1060 SSC edition, also with ACX + 3.0 cooling, will be connected there. If Costco has another Black Friday sale like the last, there'll be two of these bad boys sitting on my desk. 1080p is beginning to become dated tech, why these are now $200 less than when the one I'm now on was purchased in 2013, for $12 more than the 4K monitor I have today, which also has Displayport 1.2 rather than 1.1a  & HDMI 1.3, so recently, payed less & got more. :thumbsup:

 

That's likely what you're going to have to do, what you can do, if you have a friend or relative with a 2K (1440p) or 4K (2160p) monitor, try either or both & see which you like the best. Although word of caution, never pay more for a 2K monitor than a 4K, for starters there 2x the pixels (or 2x the monitor) over 2K. The main target for 2K are gamers, where there's 144Hz displays, which makes running any monitor at 60Hz or less look like a blur like when catching a still image. The 2K will have more detail there, yet also 2x the price over what mine cost, and there's a few 2K monitors going for over $900 shipped. That's too much cash for me to consider, even if I wanted 144Hz, would pay for it on 4K for close to the same price. 

 

You have a GPU that should serve you well for several years pricing for the GTX 1070 line has almost doubled for most all of the series, even the 1060 line, my suggestion is to pair it with a premium monitor, you'll see & feel the difference. That's the only suggestion that's made any difference for me, I became so fed up with it that unless I install a small SSD for Linux Mint (maybe a 60-64GiB on promo for root at $40 or so), am not bothering with it any longer on this PC. Am not going to wear out my best SSD be continued formatting, plus Samsung overprovisioning has been set just hours ago (didn't know this was included for NVMe SSD's), so don't have the full 512GiB to work with (really never did), the 10% reduction for overprovisioning knocked another 40+GiB off of the drive. Which was about what I had reserved for Linux Mint to begin with. 

 

Should you find success, we'd very much like to hear about it, maybe myself & others missed a trick. Am not too old to learn new ones! :thumbsup:

 

All the Best,

 

Cat


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#11 cat1092

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Posted 02 July 2017 - 10:02 PM

Yes, the 460 is an old fermi card, enough 3d potency for my needs ..and compatible with all three 32bit OSs loaded in the unit  Yes, the driver manager, not the software manager.

 

  strangely enough, as the newer generations keep improving, so do the demands like 4k and such. makes one wonder what is around the corner.

 

synergy, the answer to that will be short, sweet & to the point....8K! :thumbsup:

 

Dell was the first to release one at $5,999 not long back & a couple of others has followed suit. BTW, there's also been 5K lingering around, although seldom mentioned & never on promo. The cool thing is that all three of my last purchased GPU's supports up to 8K (4320p), so when pricing drops to $1,000 or less, will be ready. :)

 

It wasn't that many years back when 4K monitors were going for that price, more 8K monitors on the market will drive these further down (competition in motion) & thanks to space technology, while we'll likely not be able to afford one for a decade post release, 16K isn't that far off the radar (perhaps what you were asking about above), yet I'd for certain need new GPU's. Although I could see 16K pushing 8K towards today's 4K pricing, which come 5-6 years, would be delighted to have before my GPU's become obsolete. :lol:

 

Of course, well by then, 1080p monitors will be seen in the same light as 720p ones, or worse, the next lineup of CRT monitors, headed to be recycled, folks won't be able to give these away. I've recently turned down two 1600x900 (900p) & a 1080p monitor, have no more room for these. While I used to be able to rehome most any that would run, due to low pricing for the better ones, smart TV's that doubles as a monitor (with Miracast for W10 or through Intel WiDi if W7 or 8.1) plus, am not as active assisting others in real World life as I once was, am not running into quite as many folks. Yet for some of those who still visits me after calling first, often will offer a 'nice' monitor for a service performed, if it's not labor intensive (say a RAM or HDD to SSD upgrade), I do these for a flat $25, RAM I'll do for free if not a notebook requiring teardown. Most of these has upgraded to 4K & looking to dump their others, preferably for some gain. I tell them to donate to the local Hospice or Goodwill store, and if desired, can get a tax write off if itemizing, while helping a good cause where these will move. 

 

Who knows, one or the other store may well be where I find my first 8K! :)

 

BTW, your GTX 460 will still push 2K (1440p) fine! :thumbsup:

 

http://www.geforce.com/hardware/desktop-gpus/geforce-gtx-460/specifications 

 

The 192 & 256 bit bus are still today's standard, although way down from the 384 & 512 bit cards of not long back, just think how far NVIDIA could had pushed the 10 series line had the 1060 been 384 bit & 1080 & above 512, wow these could had enjoyed a 3-5 year run with some minor memory upgrades alone, rebranded as 'Ti', 'FE' & others. Yet that decision was likely in favor of using less power & producing more at the same time, although die hard gamers & enthusiasts would be licking their chops over larger bus cards. :)

 

Especially if their parents were still paying the electric bill! :P

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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