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need help from experienced IT professionals


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#1 THADANKEST

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Posted 23 June 2017 - 08:39 AM

hey IT guys I'm taking up IT right now as a college course i was wondering what it feels like to work as an IT professional

can anybody give me some experience? :)

 

 



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#2 Just_One_Question

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Posted 23 June 2017 - 09:11 AM

Check this sub-forum: IT Certifications and Careers:)



#3 mjd420nova

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Posted 23 June 2017 - 05:10 PM

It depends on the area you work in.  Software of hardware.  You could be a network administrator or a field service guy like GEEK SQUAD.



#4 britechguy

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Posted 23 June 2017 - 06:01 PM

It also depends on the company you work for, the manager (or management team) you work for, etc.

 

The one thing that seems to be consistent is that IT has been and remains an incredibly fast-paced job.  If you are not someone who deals well with change, constant change, and the need to "have it done yesterday" almost all the time you need to think about whether or not IT is the right career choice for you.

 

I've been out of the office (that is, I don't work for anyone else and did a career change into healthcare, which I've also dropped out of due to changes in the whole arena) but have never been away from IT entirely.   For myself, and only for myself, I wouldn't think of going back to programming, system analysis, or database management in a production environment no matter what industry (or agency) I was supporting.  I just don't want to deal with the constant fire-fighting, which also seems to me to be endemic in IT.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
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#5 jwoods301

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Posted 23 June 2017 - 07:14 PM

The hours can sometimes be long, and in some jobs, you are required to be "on call".

 

You also need to constantly keep learning new skills, as technology changes (which is one of the things I do like).

 

People skills are sometimes more importand than technical skills. Business skills are good to have as well.

 

IT is (or should be) as much about customer service as it is technology.


Edited by jwoods301, 23 June 2017 - 07:15 PM.


#6 britechguy

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Posted 23 June 2017 - 07:33 PM

The hours can sometimes be long, and in some jobs, you are required to be "on call".


Yep, and when I was working in telecomm I was on call. When I worked as a consultant for a database company I was the "hired fire fighter" who was often lied to (either by my own management or the companies calling for the consult) about the actual circumstances occurring. No one ever seemed to think that this would make a solution take longer.
 

You also need to constantly keep learning new skills, as technology changes (which is one of the things I do like).


As did I, and do I. The only thing I didn't like was the constant hype that every change was "revolutionary" rather than either a really nice evolution of what you've known for a very long or just plain hype.

I also got frustrated with every new thing being the be-all and end-all. Anyone remember 4GLs, object-oriented programming, . . .

 

People skills are sometimes more important than technical skills. Business skills are good to have as well.


I would go so far to say that people skills are always more important than technical skills. Excellent technicians are really not that difficult to find if you know what you're looking for. Those who actually can get out of geek mode and interact with end users, customers, etc., are worth their weight in gold. I'd also say that's business skill number one, though there are plenty of others.
 

IT is (or should be) as much about customer service as it is technology.


Pretty much any successful business, or professional, is as much or more about customer service, and meeting their customer on the customer's level, not their own, than anything else.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
             ~ Lauren Bacall
              

 


#7 jwoods301

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Posted 23 June 2017 - 08:11 PM

I would go so far to say that people skills are always more important than technical skills.

 

From what I've been hearing, many companies place more emphasis on technical skills during the hiring process.

 

Pretty much any successful business, or professional, is as much or more about customer service, and meeting their customer on the customer's level, not their own, than anything else.

 

IT departments internal to the business often hold on to the "keepers of the sacred scrolls" attitude, but I think it is changing.



#8 britechguy

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Posted 23 June 2017 - 09:30 PM

From what I've been hearing, many companies place more emphasis on technical skills during the hiring process.


'Twas ever thus. It's much easier for technical staff to evaluate "hard skills" than "soft skills." Particularly since those doing the interviewing often (not always, but often) lack soft skills themselves.
 

IT departments internal to the business often hold on to the "keepers of the sacred scrolls" attitude, but I think it is changing.


Actually, depending on how you mean that, this can be a big plus. One of the things I noticed, and not just in IT, over the last several decades is the rising attitude that employees are like interchangeable parts. Virtually no value is placed on institutional memory. Knowing the ins and outs of where you work, what's come before and why you might or might not want to repeat it, and more only comes from experience. That kind of experience is, in my observation, "the sacred scrolls." The dead wood in an organization can't tell you what happened last week, nor care about what might happen next.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
             ~ Lauren Bacall
              

 


#9 THADANKEST

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Posted 23 June 2017 - 11:48 PM

but what about learning? because as of right now im an incoming 3rd year in college and i seem to think that i still lack 

soooo much skill in IT and programming.

 

heck the only language i know is C++ and  I'm still learning basics about it :(



#10 britechguy

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Posted 24 June 2017 - 07:37 AM

Well, now you've shifted your question, and it's one I can't answer as far as what's "hot hot hot" in computing/IT these days.

 

If your institution of higher learning has a computer science or information science department take a look at the course catalog and the requirements to get a degree in same.

 

One programming language does not a computing professional make.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
             ~ Lauren Bacall
              

 


#11 THADANKEST

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Posted 24 June 2017 - 07:48 AM

it's just that I get pretty doubtful about my skill as an IT student in his 3rd year in college hahaha



#12 mjd420nova

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Posted 24 June 2017 - 09:26 AM

Over the decades I've seen hundreds of new hires, many with great people skills but little real IT skills.  There are a hoard of individuals who can talk the talk but can't walk the walk.  Find a niche or skill you're good at and concentrate on developing that skill.  In my case, people skills are the most important as they have brought  many clients to me for help and I've been able to do what was needed.  Find a part of the work you enjoy and build on that.  I stress safety as you never know what you'll be required to do.  Electrical    safety is essential for anyone interested in hardware.  Whether sitting behind a console monitoring network traffic or at a customers home replacing a hard drive, working with others may be required and the work place may not be the best.  I agree that to get to the top one must learn how to be a "fireman", as many clients will deem their problem to be the most important.  As you build skills and show expertise, be ready to get pulled off of one job to join others on a "hot" job or to take over the job that another isn't quite up to speed on.  Best of luck and hang in there.



#13 jwoods301

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Posted 24 June 2017 - 01:38 PM

but what about learning? because as of right now im an incoming 3rd year in college and i seem to think that i still lack 

soooo much skill in IT and programming.

 

heck the only language i know is C++ and  I'm still learning basics about it :(

 

C++ is still a top-tier programming language after almost 35 years, so it's a nice start.

 

There are enough similarites that you would not have a difficult time moving to Java or C#.

 

Take a look around locally for user groups that line up with your interests.



#14 GoofProg

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Posted 01 July 2017 - 12:47 PM

I was a lucky person that did not need a computer related degree to get an IT job.  I had a general science discipline.

I would say study and do your work and get your degree and work for corporate.

Some people know IT pretty well and just do things as a hobby.

I never got my A+ .. wait a minute.

Yes, you can be a Dell Technician without A+.  I was.

I would say more of a in house corporate Dell service technician.  I did a lot more though.

Actaully I would say... gravitate to cisco or microsoft engineering.

Why?

I know places that had certificed techs that got paid $8.00/hr.

 

Oh... and official learn how to type.

Yes, typing is imperiative to everything else including running a data center.

So grab a copy of Mavis Becon typing tutor.


Edited by GoofProg, 01 July 2017 - 12:52 PM.





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