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Microsoft admits to disabling third-party antivirus code if Win 10 doesn't like


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#1 JohnC_21

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 09:33 PM

Windows 10 does disable some third-party security software, Microsoft has admitted, but because of compatibility – not competitive – issues.
 
Redmond is currently being sued by security house Kaspersky Lab in the EU, Germany and Russia over alleged anti-competitive behavior because it bundles the Windows Defender security suite into its latest operating system. Kaspersky (and others) claim Microsoft is up to its Internet Explorer shenanigans again, but that’s not so, said the operating system giant.
 
“Microsoft’s application compatibility teams found that roughly 95 per cent of Windows 10 PCs had an antivirus application installed that was already compatible with Windows 10 Creators Update,” said Rob Lefferts, director of security in the Windows and Devices group.
 
“For the small number of applications that still needed updating, we built a feature just for AV apps that would prompt the customer to install a new version of their AV app right after the update completed. To do this, we first temporarily disabled some parts of the AV software when the update began.”
 
Lefferts claimed that Windows Defender is fine with other security software on a PC, but if that third-party code expires or becomes outdated then Redmond’s security software will kick in. He said Defender wouldn’t scan a system without the permission of the operator.
 
He also said that Microsoft works actively with third-party security firms to ensure compatibility, but is short on specifics. One of the key planks of Kaspersky’s case against Microsoft is that it cut compatability testing times from two months to six days.

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Cutting compatibility testing to six days is unrealistic. It will be interesting how all this plays out in Europe.

 

 



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#2 jwoods301

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Posted 21 June 2017 - 12:11 AM

Old news.

 

When Windows 10 was first released, Microsoft said it would remove any program it found incompatible, and place it in the Windows.old directory.

 

It happenns when a major update is installed.

 

https://www.howtogeek.com/243581/windows-10-may-delete-your-programs-without-asking/



#3 cafejose

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Posted 21 June 2017 - 03:30 AM

Some of us are lucky.  New computer with Windows 10 also has Norton Security installed and no disabling yet occured.  Newer computer with Windows 10 has only Windows Defender and Window 10 Firewall according to briteguy or britetech member here guidance on being good enough for most users, and no other Protection-Security software installed; and so far no trouble on the machine.



#4 JohnC_21

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Posted 21 June 2017 - 07:02 AM

Old news.

 

When Windows 10 was first released, Microsoft said it would remove any program it found incompatible, and place it in the Windows.old directory.

 

It happenns when a major update is installed.

 

https://www.howtogeek.com/243581/windows-10-may-delete-your-programs-without-asking/

The perfect reason I will never install Windows 10. Never had that happened to me on linux or Windows 7 and 8 for that matter. And Windows 10 is going to have two major upgrades per year? No thanks. Sorry, but from what I have seen Windows 10 looks like it's in a constant state of Beta. The insider builds that lists the bug fixes proves that.

 

https://blogs.windows.com/windowsexperience/tag/windows-insider-program/

https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/commandline/wsl/release_notes

 

https://www.windowscentral.com/windows10-anniversary-update-common-problems-how-fix

 

https://www.windowscentral.com/windows-10-creators-update-user-experience-complaints

 

Never mind the update that hosed the partitions on external drives during the update

 

Edited by JohnC_21, 21 June 2017 - 08:53 AM.


#5 britechguy

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Posted 21 June 2017 - 08:58 AM

John,

 

        You can find nasty exceptions to every "rule of smoothness" and there is not a single OS out there that doesn't have them.

 

        These very forums, taken as a whole, demonstrate that conclusively.

 

         The complaints that are coming in, and they exist and are legitimate, are from a very, very small proportion of users of Windows 10.  Just like the complaints and issues (though different ones) are coming in from a very small proportion of users of Windows 7, Windows 8, Windows 8.1, and a wide variety of Linux distros.

 

          I have had but one service call that was related to what at first appeared to be Windows 10 itself, but after a lot of work we eventually determined it wasn't the OS, but a hardware failure, and the manufacturer took the machine back and exchanged it for another.

 

          Overall, Windows 10, at least since Version 1607 (Anniversary Update), just keeps getting more and more trouble free.  More and more does not mean "actually" as there is no actually trouble free OS.

 

           Also, not all of the issues can be dropped in Microsoft's lap, either.   I had a number of programs "archived" by the first install of Windows 10 that run perfectly fine under Windows 10.  That was because the makers of those pieces of software never bothered to make the tweaks that identify themselves to Windows 10 as being compatible with Windows 10.  The method for doing this was published many months before even the first release.   What's been interesting is that I haven't had any of the programs that I reinstalled after archiving when I upgraded to Windows 10 ever archived again.  Since some of these are definitely "very old code" I have to believe that Windows 10 has some way of knowing that you installed something under Windows 10 itself and avoiding archiving those things during major upgrades.  [Now watch, when I get the update from Version 1703 to the one later this year, 17XX, I'll probably get a slew of things archived.]


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

             ~ Brian Vogel

 

 

 

              

 


#6 dhagerjohns

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Posted 24 June 2017 - 01:45 PM

I read this article, and the title is click-bate.  This is a good thing that Windows does.  Does anyone want incompatible AVs running?  I think not.  As for the person who says he is lucky to have Norton running, I suggest he uninstall that bloatware ASAP.  Windows Defender is all anyone needs.






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