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How do I stay at 1607 and avoid 1703?


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#1 burnITdown

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 09:12 AM

I have an issue with a driver in 1703 that didn't exist in 1607. Tired of trying to fix it or waiting for some update to magically resolve it.

 

If I reload 1607 Pro, how do I go about ensuring that I don't automatically update to 1703 but still continue to get security updates?

 

Thanks.



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#2 britechguy

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 09:34 AM

Put most simply:  You Don't.

 

The amount of work necessary to disable the Windows as a Service paradigm, which breaks so many things in the process of doing so, just isn't worth it because of what it breaks.

 

If you wish to continue using Windows 10 it is known that version updates are part and parcel of the bargain.  Trying to get around them causes far more issues than it solves.

 

P.S. since it's been brought up recently:   I do not work for Microsoft, have never worked for Microsoft, and have no financial interest in Microsoft


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#3 burnITdown

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 09:46 AM

Ugh. Can't say I'm surprised by that. Thanks for the info.



#4 britechguy

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 10:02 AM

I really wish Microsoft had somehow been better about getting the public to understand precisely what "Windows as a Service" means and what a huge paradigm shift it was from the old way of doing things [Base software, fixes/patches, service packs].

 

Most software makers have come to realize that the longstanding system of release and maintain, next release and maintain, next release and maintain, simply could not keep pace with the rate of change going on around them, particularly in terms of operating systems being able to exploit new hardware features that seem to appear almost daily.

 

The shift to literal "continuous improvement" [for some value of improvement] was driven by this realization and, whether customers want to admit it now that they're floating on that river themselves, demand for a more rapid ability to take advantage of "the new stuff."   The amount of "Oooooooh, shiny" syndrome among marketing types and a certain class of customer, and that class is the one that has to have the newest thing every week and is quite lucrative, certainly had its role in driving all this as well.

 

I'm working on a laptop that has a "born on" date in 2014 and that is, in computing terms, an absolute antique now.  That's how quickly things change.  The fact that it does everything I need it to do, and will probably continue to do so for quite some time yet, means I don't need a new one.  I am the very antithesis of "Oooooooh, shiny" syndrome and the kind of customer that technology companies hate as a result.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#5 Joe C

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 01:11 PM

Our friends at 0&0 software (they're known for making a great de-fragment program back when) provide a free software called "Shut Up 10" which provides more control over your   pc. That includes control of updates.

https://www.oo-software.com/en/shutup10



#6 britechguy

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 02:02 PM

The following was posted just days ago by a very respected member of our community, and perfectly sums up why I think that any attempt to "control Windows updates" is a fool's errand:

 

There really isn't a point to checking for updates and not installing them. . .  It's important to install all available updates. I've been doing this since the days of DOS, and I still don't have the confidence to pick and choose among updates.  There are just too many variables involved - and most people can't evaluate the full consequences of installing/not installing updates.

        ~ John Carrona, AKA usasma on BleepingComputer.com, http://www.carrona.org/

 

It is the worst form of hubris to believe that you, any you, know more about what updates should be applied to any operating system when the very entities that created and maintain them have decided otherwise.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#7 Joe C

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 02:49 PM

I'm not recommending that anybody not get updates, but many times updates come at the most opportune times when your trying to do something else. Plus many times a driver update will throw a monkey wrench into the whole works, Most peeps that are tech savvy will probably want to choose a better time for updates and also which drivers they do and do not want. Just because there's a driver update does not mean that the updated driver will be of any benefit for you, sometimes it is more detrimental to your system



#8 jwoods301

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 03:33 PM

The following was posted just days ago by a very respected member of our community, and perfectly sums up why I think that any attempt to "control Windows updates" is a fool's errand:

 

There really isn't a point to checking for updates and not installing them. . .  It's important to install all available updates. I've been doing this since the days of DOS, and I still don't have the confidence to pick and choose among updates.  There are just too many variables involved - and most people can't evaluate the full consequences of installing/not installing updates.

        ~ John Carrona, AKA usasma on BleepingComputer.com, http://www.carrona.org/

 

It is the worst form of hubris to believe that you, any you, know more about what updates should be applied to any operating system when the very entities that created and maintain them have decided otherwise.

 

+1



#9 JohnC_21

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 03:38 PM

It's kind of a mute point now that Microsoft puts all their security updates into a rollup. Personally, I did pick and choose what "important" updates Microsoft was giving me. I had no reason to install an important update for the Russian Ruble or Lithuanian currency.



#10 jwoods301

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 03:39 PM

Most peeps that are tech savvy will probably want to choose a better time for updates and also which drivers they do and do not want.

 

They can -

 

http://www.digitalcitizen.life/how-set-when-windows-10-allowed-install-updates-and-restart-your-pc

 

https://www.laptopmag.com/articles/disable-automatic-driver-downloads-on-windows-10



#11 britechguy

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 03:58 PM

Most peeps that are tech savvy aren't tech savvy enough to know system internals, period.  That's what you would need to be very well versed in if you were to be able to make an informed decision about what updates should or should not be applied, at least related to the OS.

 

Windows 10 has evolved now to give you the ability to shield your machine for up to 18 hours per day from applying updates, allowing you to defer updates for up to two weeks (I think, as I haven't done it yet my memory is hazy and I tend to update ASAP in all cases), and be notified that a restart is coming even when it is coming during the hours outside those you've designated as "active hours."

 

It was not this way, at least not in its entirety, up through Version 1607, but that's what's now in place in Version 1703.  [Mind you, this is for non-enterprise editions, there's a lot more control over enterprise edition, and on a tech forum I'd think the reasons for that would be obvious.]

 

People were complaining, and I was one of them, about the "rude interruptions" you would often get, completely unaware they were coming, as far as Windows Updates.  It appears those complaints were heard and acted upon.

 

That laptopmag.com article is very good.  I actually despise the "manufacturers apps and custom icons" wording because no one but the ultra-geekily-informed would translate that phrase to "device drivers."  In the early versions of Windows 10 the wording was far less vague.  I wrote up the following for my blind and visually-impaired clients who had very good reason to want to prevent unexpected device driver updates, particularly in the early days of Windows 10:


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#12 r0bbienz

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Posted 01 August 2017 - 02:58 AM

Hi 

burnITdown

 

Hope you havent updated yet - because you CAN stay on 1607 but its a bit fiddly 

 

What you do is set your connections to metered so the updates dont come automatically

https://www.windowscentral.com/how-set-ethernet-connection-metered-windows-10

 

Then keep an eye on this website for updates for 1607

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/4000825

 

When a update comes through read about the update and at the bottom it says

To get the stand-alone package for this update, go to the Microsoft Update Catalog website.

 

You download the update and apply to keep upto date with security

 

Thats my method, hope that helps 

 

 

 



#13 Adam Pollard

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Posted 01 August 2017 - 05:51 PM

Until Microsoft move to an app whitelist system where all programs have to be tested for compatibility and security versus new patches, they will continue to piss people off. You expect phones and tablets to be consumer toys which are provided for you to use, and you are basically in the hands of the vendor. However, businesses in particular expect to be able to continue to use legacy software and drivers, and if an update renders their x thousand $ software unusable, you can see why they might be unhappy. This can be avoided (last time I checked) in domain controller environments but not in workgroup based networks.

 

The strength of PCs was that the user was in control, not the computer/chain of command with Microsoft at the top.

 

Linux on my laptop, Windows 7 on my main PC. Windows 10 on my customers' pcs. Poor sods when something goes wrong. Im shifting Vista users to Linux Mint. I give Microsoft another 4 years, 3 years till they stop supporting Win 7 updates, and more and more techies will move their customers to linux or mac.



#14 britechguy

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Posted 01 August 2017 - 06:18 PM

Adam Pollard wrote, in part, ". . . more and more techies will move their customers to linux or mac."

 

Which the Linux community has been saying for as long as it's been around.  The fervor of Linux and Apple folks both border on cultish.

 

I've worked with several flavors of Unix, mainframe OSes, DOS, Windows in every guise it's had so far, and more.  It's not the techies who will be making the decision to move long-term Windows users, particularly those in the business world, to Linux.  The folks that run those businesses and their many millions of employees will have lots to say and, given the desire for familiarity, I don't worry for the fate of Microsoft.

 

And before you say it with regard to me, I am not a Microsoft fanboy.   I've just been around this block way more times than I would care to count, having started my professional life in the IT/computing world in 1985.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#15 Adam Pollard

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Posted 01 August 2017 - 06:37 PM

Adam Pollard wrote, in part, ". . . more and more techies will move their customers to linux or mac."

 

Which the Linux community has been saying for as long as it's been around.  The fervor of Linux and Apple folks both border on cultish.

 

I've worked with several flavors of Unix, mainframe OSes, DOS, Windows in every guise it's had so far, and more.  It's not the techies who will be making the decision to move long-term Windows users, particularly those in the business world, to Linux.  The folks that run those businesses and their many millions of employees will have lots to say and, given the desire for familiarity, I don't worry for the fate of Microsoft.

 

And before you say it with regard to me, I am not a Microsoft fanboy.   I've just been around this block way more times than I would care to count, having started my professional life in the IT/computing world in 1985.

And the biggest OS in the world is now Android, I believe... a Linux derivative. Followed by iOS? Only in the rapidly diminishing world of PCs does Microsoft still dominate. As a support tech, I am getting more and more calls to do with devices other than PCs, even with businesses. Many small businesses these days are using Linux based NAS drives instead of Microsoft Servers. Im about to install Linux on an all in one PC, because it keeps BSOD because of a network driver error on a fresh install of 8.1. It's a kernel mode driver, so crashes the system. I suspect its a intermittent hardware fault. Windows 10 install had a different issue, 1607 was fine, but with an update (didnt check which one) the cursor continually loses focus so you can't even log in.

Boot from a linux rescue disk, stable as anything, and I can choose when it updates. That's maybe 10 domestic customers moved to Linux this year. Most of them are ex Vista users who dont want to pay for a W10 licence, and I dont push them to move to W10, as installing Linux has never been easier.


Edited by Adam Pollard, 01 August 2017 - 06:40 PM.





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