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Why doesn't Windows have third party drivers built-in the kernel?


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#1 SuperSapien64

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Posted 19 June 2017 - 09:12 PM

I really love how Linux has a lot of the third party drivers built into the kernel, but Windows doesn't. Why is this?

Now I don't know if Windows 10 comes close to this but I doubt it has third party drivers built into the kernel.

Please share your thoughts and any info on this topic. :)



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#2 MadmanRB

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 01:00 AM

I really love how Linux has a lot of the third party drivers built into the kernel, but Windows doesn't. Why is this?

Now I don't know if Windows 10 comes close to this but I doubt it has third party drivers built into the kernel.

Please share your thoughts and any info on this topic. :)

 

Actually technically windows does have this, it normally detects hardware automatically using plug and play and other such things.

The base drivers are there but not the actual drivers.

Those are via third parties.


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#3 cafejose

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 01:41 AM

I really love how Linux has a lot of the third party drivers built into the kernel, but Windows doesn't. Why is this?

Now I don't know if Windows 10 comes close to this but I doubt it has third party drivers built into the kernel.

Please share your thoughts and any info on this topic. :)

Here is an interesting experience which the expert members here can comment on:

 

I bought a cheap graphical pen & tablet and DID need to install the driver for it onto the older computer having Windows Vista, and another having Windows XP.  I had also tried plugging in the graphical tablet without installing the included drivers software, and the results were bad in the computer recognizing and setting-up to be able to use the graphical tablet & pen.  Not any problem on the machines on which I did install the necessary driver.

 

The same cheap graphical pen & tablet, when plugged in to a Windows 10 computer, accepts the device very quickly, and usage goes well, too.  The driver software which came included with the device needed no installation.



#4 britechguy

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 10:39 AM

I guess that depends on exactly what you mean by "third-party drivers built-in the kernel."

 

I would not want these truly "built-in" because they are third-party and drivers are subject to change in ways the OS is not.  But, I do want them "shipped with" in the form of a database of common drivers from which the OS can choose when it recognizes the addition of a piece of hardware along with a function that at least attempts to check, "is there something newer," on the OS maker's own cloud-based driver database it could install.

 

Windows has been doing the latter for a very long time now.   There were a lot of early driver-related issues with Win10 (for equipment that's still being produced) just as much because the equipment makers either didn't update the drivers to work with Windows 10, or didn't supply the updatedn drivers to MS for inclusion with the shipped database or inclusion on the cloud database of drivers.  When it comes to discontinued hardware the situation becomes much more complicated, as you can sometimes find a driver that works that wasn't written specifically for Windows 10 and sometimes you can't.

 

I had to abandon an old Dell Inspiron 1720 as a Windows 10 box after an extensive search (at the time, and documented on this very site) did not turn up a functioning driver for the mouse pad, of all things.  It's now a Linux Mint box, but not being actively used at the moment.


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#5 SuperSapien64

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 11:29 AM

What I mean by built-in third-party drivers would be such as graphic cards, cpu's and wireless cards/WiFi not just external devices.



#6 britechguy

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 11:32 AM

But what I'm trying to say is "built-in" means "built-in".   I never want device drivers actually built in.   I want the mechanisms to automatically locate the appropriate ones and install them as needed built-in, but the drivers themselves for most third-party hardware should not be a part of any OS kernel.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#7 SuperSapien64

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Posted 21 June 2017 - 06:08 PM

But what I'm trying to say is "built-in" means "built-in".   I never want device drivers actually built in.   I want the mechanisms to automatically locate the appropriate ones and install them as needed built-in, but the drivers themselves for most third-party hardware should not be a part of any OS kernel.

So would think it be OK if Windows would automatically locate the appropriate drivers for graphics cards, cpu's, and wireless cards?



#8 Threesom666

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Posted 29 July 2017 - 02:11 AM

Simple mathematics. MMOOONNEYYY!






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