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Microsoft Surface Laptop - 0 out of 10 for repairability


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#1 JohnC_21

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Posted 19 June 2017 - 07:12 AM

10 steps to replace the battery and destroy the computer in the process? It is truely pathetic when you can't replace something like the battery which you know will eventually die. Microsoft is turning into Apple. This is just a waste of resources. I pity the landfills.

 

The Surface Laptop is finally vanquished disassembled!

Verdict: The Surface Laptop is not a laptop. It’s a glue-filled monstrosity. There is nothing about it that is upgradable or long-lasting, and it literally can’t be opened without destroying it. (Show us the procedure, Microsoft, we’d love to be wrong.)
Here for your viewing pleasure: the parts that will never be whole again..

Article

 

And the Surface Pro 5 is just as bad.

If we learned anything from the last Surface Pro we tore down, it's that the battery is a pain to remove, and it doesn't go back in quite the same.All told, it’s nearly identical to its predecessor—aside from ditching the last remaining upgradable component, the modular SSD. Yeah, Microsoft impressed us—by being way worse than we expected.

 


 

 

 


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#2 SuperSapien64

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Posted 19 June 2017 - 09:04 PM

Some of the new Android devices are the same such as the Samsung Galaxy S7/8.



#3 JohnC_21

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Posted 19 June 2017 - 09:23 PM

Repairability is getting ridiculous. My old compaq laptop has access panels and the keyboard can easily be replaced. I refuse to purchase a computer where I can't easily replace a battery. If you look at the newer laptops you need to remove the full back panel just to get at the battery or hard drive.  It's bad enough batteries on smartphones are impossible to replace.



#4 Just_One_Question

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 10:41 AM



Some of the new Android devices are the same such as the Samsung Galaxy S7/8.

You can check wherever you like, there are no current flagship cell phones with removable battery any more available on the planet, if I'm not mistaken.



#5 JohnC_21

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 10:50 AM

 



Some of the new Android devices are the same such as the Samsung Galaxy S7/8.

You can check wherever you like, there are no current flagship cell phones with removable battery any more available on the planet, if I'm not mistaken.

 

That is correct. It takes a complete teardown if at all possible. Most are glued in place. The only company that I know of with replaceable batteries is LG.



#6 britechguy

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 10:54 AM

And, again, those of us here who are lamenting this are in the very distinct minority, whether it be for smart phones or other computing devices.

 

We have long lived in a "throw away" society and that has been so for technology for decades now.   The vast majority seem to want "the latest and greatest" whether they need it or not for what they actually use it for.  Every time a new iPhone launches my jaw just drops at the lines of people almost all of whom are not using even half of the features of their existing iPhone, probably less than 2 years old, lining up to get the next one.

 

Consumer electronics, and that includes computers, are becoming entirely disposable because the cost just keeps dropping like a stone for the computing power you get (my Galaxy S7 has more computing power than the mainframes I started out life with) and the pace of change keeps growing almost exponentially.

 

The days of "maintainable computers" from the hardware side are very, very rapidly drawing to a close.  At least now places like Goodwill are actively involved in recycling discarded technology rather than it having to go to the landfill.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#7 JohnC_21

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 11:05 AM

I prefer desktops. At least I can do some replacements if something goes bad. My problem is with our throwaway society. My grandfather would be spinning in his grave if he saw the waste and throwing a phone away after a year or two of use is a waste, especially if it winds up in a poor third world country for "recycling".

 

The surface laptop isn't exactly cheap. I would expect some ease of repair for prices Microsoft is charging. 

 

Pricing starts at $999, and quickly goes up from there. We’ve summarized the pricing per configuration below along with scheduled ship date. Detailed specs follow:

Intel Core i5 CPU, 4GB RAM, 128GB SSD: $999 (June 15)

Intel Core i5 CPU, 8GB RAM, 256GB SSD: $1,299 (June 15)

Intel Core i7 CPU, 8GB RAM, 256GB SSD: $1,599 (June 15)

 

Intel Core i7 CPU, 16GB RAM, 512GB SSD: $2,199 (June 30)

 

Compare the ten steps and destruction of the computer to get at the battery vs a relatively cheap lenovo chromebook which does have a serviceable battery.


Edited by JohnC_21, 20 June 2017 - 11:15 AM.


#8 Just_One_Question

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 11:23 AM

For what it's worth, it should be also noted as a good thing that manufacturers, at least from my perspective, have been making ever-better in quality batteries, which last longer. Then again, people nowadays are using their phones much more than before, so the benefit of the longer-lasting (in terms of overall life) batteries is pushed back by the much higher strain of every-day usage and recharging of those batteries. My point is that if you are not a heavy user, by the time it would take for your phone's battery to be in a need of replacement, you'd probably want/need a new phone as a decade or so would have passed.

 

P.S. BTW, on the topic of throwaway society, true story: I went to play some football 1 week ago with the kids (12-13 year olds) from my block. One of them wanted me to hold onto his phone as he was about to shoot a penalty kick and was afraid of dropping it from his pocket. He specifically instructed me to be careful with the device as it was "the smartphone which he has had for the longest in his life so far" by his own words. I looked at the phone and replied that it didn't appear to be that ancient piece of tech. The kid then told me that his parents had bought it for him last August...(meaning that the phone is 10 months old) :lmao:

 

Also, an interesting read - https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Life_spans_of_home_appliances . :)



#9 britechguy

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 12:28 PM

JOQ, with that last example you have given the perfect illustration of what I'm referring to.

 

People here would probably not believe the number of things I've fixed, both electronic and otherwise, because I don't believe in throwing something away that can be serviced and function again, often even if "the official statement" is that it cannot be serviced.  I've taken apart scavenger pumps for automotive heating systems to replace brushes because that's all that was needed, but the official way of fixing this is to install a replacement pump.

 

But, those of us who espouse that philosophy have been in the minority for a very long time and companies are about making money and giving their target demographics what they want.  When it comes to technology that means "newer, faster (as in the next generation, not necessarily performance), prettier" where it's well known that most will be disposed of long before their respective component parts could ever be expected to reach end of service life.

 

There are battles I know I can't win, and insisting that design be done with maintenance in mind is one of those.  If you work on anything you will find that the design focus is almost exclusively on efficiency of assembly with as close to zero consideration of maintenance as can be.  And this is even on stuff that it's acknowledged will likely need maintenance of some sort during its lifetime.  There are cars now where a spark plug change requires dropping the engine!!  Of course, part of that is because both spark plug technology and fuel injection technology have come together such that, unless there is a really unexpected failure of some sort, both should last the lifetime of the vehicle (often beyond - that's how salvage yards stay in business).  

 

I think that most of us, though, even if we love maintaining our computers realize that their life is most often far more finite than many other products that inhabit our spheres.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#10 techghost

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 03:45 PM

Well, they claim to provide high quality that only rarely requires repairing. And most companies are now doing this. 



#11 Just_One_Question

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 04:37 PM

Yes, I agree with everything.

BTW, what does happen in a situation where you do have one of those smartphones with a non-removable battery and it fails on you, but you don't want to buy a whole new phone? Say for example that you've now got an iPhone 5S which is out of warranty nowadays and its battery goes bad, but everything else works fine. Do you go to Apple for a replacement? Do they sell iPhone 5S batteries alone? Or what do you do, what's the usual procedure? Sorry, if it's a silly question, I'm just curious.:)



#12 SuperSapien64

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 05:13 PM

Sounds about right I just got a new LCD TV this last December and my old LCD TV about 5-6 years old and it was showing signs decay.


Edited by SuperSapien64, 20 June 2017 - 05:13 PM.


#13 mjd420nova

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Posted 21 June 2017 - 11:12 PM

Those seemingly impossible to open cases are actually quite simple if you have the right fixture to mount and split the case halves.  They are very precision such that the cases can be opened without scratching or carving of the plastic.  Ant attempts by those without it will result in the destruction of said device.  Good Luck anyway.






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