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Which files are responsible for keyboard and mouse function?


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#1 McDohl

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 05:56 PM

Long story short my keyboard and mouse isn't working in my secondary PC, and I'd like to know which files are responsible for their functioning. I've tried everything in the book to try and fix this. I have the SSD connected to my primary PC and I'm curious if I can drag drop or install any particular driver files onto the SSD to replace the corrupted ones to fix the issue. I'm currently navigating around the drive to salvage files just in case I need to wipe it.

 

My previous thread where it goes into detail of other ways that I've tried to fix this issue: https://www.bleepingcomputer.com/forums/t/649256/keyboard-and-mouse-not-working-after-booting-windows/



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#2 jwoods301

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 06:53 PM

Try running sfc /SCANNOW from an elevated (Run as Administrator) Command prompt.



#3 McDohl

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 07:42 PM

Try running sfc /SCANNOW from an elevated (Run as Administrator) Command prompt.

The only way I'm able to do this is within the advanced startup options, will that suffice?



#4 jwoods301

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 11:42 PM

Absolutely.

 

Note that you may need to run sfc several times.

 

From TenForums -

 

If SFC could not fix something, then run the command again to see if it may be able to the next time. Sometimes it may take running the sfc /scannow command up to 3 times with Fast Startup turned off and restarting the computer after each time to completely fix everything that it's able to.

If not, then run the Dism /Online /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth command to repair any component store corruption, restart the PC afterwards, and try the sfc /scannow command again.

If still not, then do a system restore using a restore point dated before the bad system file occurred to fix it. You may need to repeat doing a system restore until you find a older restore point that may work.

If still not, then you could do a repair install without losing anything.

If still not, then you could refresh Windows 10.



#5 McDohl

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 05:45 PM

Absolutely.

 

Note that you may need to run sfc several times.

 

From TenForums -

 

If SFC could not fix something, then run the command again to see if it may be able to the next time. Sometimes it may take running the sfc /scannow command up to 3 times with Fast Startup turned off and restarting the computer after each time to completely fix everything that it's able to.

If not, then run the Dism /Online /Cleanup-Image /RestoreHealth command to repair any component store corruption, restart the PC afterwards, and try the sfc /scannow command again.

If still not, then do a system restore using a restore point dated before the bad system file occurred to fix it. You may need to repeat doing a system restore until you find a older restore point that may work.

If still not, then you could do a repair install without losing anything.

If still not, then you could refresh Windows 10.

Thanks man, I tried running the sfc /scannnow in the command prompt on the advanced startup options and got the following error after the scan: "windows resource protection could not perform the requested operation." Any ideas on how to get around this?



#6 jwoods301

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 06:37 PM

From a Command Prompt, type chkdsk /r followed by Enter.

 

After it runs, try sfc again.



#7 McDohl

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 06:40 PM

From a Command Prompt, type chkdsk /r followed by Enter.

 

After it runs, try sfc again.

When I try that this is what it says:

"The type of the file system is NTFS.
Cannot lock current drive.

Windows cannot run disk checking on this volume because it is write protected."



#8 jwoods301

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 06:47 PM

Create a bootable Windows 10 ISO.

 

Boot from that into the Troubleshooting menu.

 

Navigate to the Command Prompt.



#9 McDohl

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 06:55 PM

Create a bootable Windows 10 ISO.

 

Boot from that into the Troubleshooting menu.

 

Navigate to the Command Prompt.

Can I just use my secondary PC with Windows to do that? And which troubleshooting menu are you referring to?


Edited by McDohl, 16 June 2017 - 07:01 PM.





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