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computer will not reload wxp


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#1 001dek

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 05:34 PM

Computer is Dell Optiplex 740 w/60g hdd, refurbished. I bought it to use while repairing my principal computer several years ago.. It was pre-loaded with wxp pro. I used it until repairs were completed and put it aside. Tried to start it recently when my current computer (w8) developed problems. To wit, internal battery died and would not not boot to win. I put a new battery in and put a bootable CD w/wxp in. Would still not boot. I finally tried to reload wxp and it went through the motions of loading but in the end would still not boot to win.

Thanks



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#2 jwoods301

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 05:47 PM

Are you using a boot menu to select the drive to boot from, or have you changed the boot drive order in the BIOS?



#3 001dek

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 08:22 PM

The BIOS only allows booting from a CD disc. The BIOS will not let me change to any other format and I am using a Win XP pro bootable disc. I watch on the screen as it loads. After loading and attempting to boot, it starts right back at the black screen with the error message - diskette drive 0 seek failure - below is F1 to start and F2 to enter setup. If I press F1, it asks for the CD and I go through the same process again.



#4 001dek

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 08:31 PM

Maybe I should first pull the hdd and do a reformat and then reload the os.



#5 jwoods301

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 11:28 PM

No need to "pull" the hard drive unless you are replacing it...which you might need to do.

 

First, you might find this article on how you can make and use a Linux Live CD to repair issues on a Windows PC helpful...

 

https://www.howtogeek.com/howto/31804/the-10-cleverest-ways-to-use-linux-to-fix-your-windows-pc/

 

Some of the topics of interest in your situation are:

 

Diagnose Windows or Hardware Problem
Scan Your Windows PC for Viruses
Access or Backup Files from Your Dead Windows PC
- which will be important in getting your personal data off the hard drive.


Edited by jwoods301, 15 June 2017 - 11:30 PM.


#6 Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 02:07 AM

The BIOS only allows booting from a CD disc. The BIOS will not let me change to any other format and I am using a Win XP pro bootable disc. I watch on the screen as it loads. After loading and attempting to boot, it starts right back at the black screen with the error message - diskette drive 0 seek failure - below is F1 to start and F2 to enter setup. If I press F1, it asks for the CD and I go through the same process again.

 

First are you trying to boot a HD from one computer in another computer?  If so it won't work.  Each installation is "married" to the computer it was installed on.  drivers, particularly chipset drivers will only work with the installed computer, so if you "walked' the XP HD from the old computer to the Win8 computer, it's never going to boot.

 

Assuming you are just trying to boot the old machine with the old XP HD installed. The BIOS battery died means that you lost all your BIOS settings, to include boot order and a bunch of other stuff and getting those settings right may be necessary to get the machine to boot at all.  It all depends on what the factory defaults are.  Usually they are the safest settings possible but you never know.  Pay particular attention to "boot order" and make certain your old XP HD is even recognized in BIOS.  If you don't see a 60 Gbyte HD with the manufacturers standard prefix (ST... for Seagate, WD for Western Digital, etc...) that means it's not being recognized by BIOS.  Check to make sure it has power and the data cable is plugged in.  It's probably IDE and not SATA, so you also have to think about whether or not it's configured "Master" or "Slave" properly.  If it's exactly the same as it was when it last worked, don't change anything about the cable or the jumpers.

 

If the HD is recognized in BIOS the next step is to get it listed as the #1 boot device in the boot order.  Then see if it will boot.  And old motherboard like that could easily be bad due to bad caps.  You can google "bad caps" if you want to know more about that.



#7 jwoods301

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 02:24 AM

 

so if you "walked' the XP HD from the old computer to the Win8 computer, it's never going to boot.

 

 

The OP never stated that.

 

It could be as simple as repairing the Master Boot record...

 

https://www.lifewire.com/how-to-repair-the-master-boot-record-in-windows-xp-2624513

 

However, if the OP can get personal files off the hard drive, a reformat and fresh install of XP would be the cleanest approach.


Edited by jwoods301, 16 June 2017 - 02:33 AM.


#8 Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 02:05 AM

His symptoms indicate to me that either the HD is not being recognized in BIOS ("diskette" boot failure was the clue, meaning it's gone down the boot order to a 3 1/2" floppy drive), or he's attempting to boot an "disk with XP on it" from another computer.  No he didn't say this.  I'm attempting to figure out what's going on without having to ask too many technical questions that involve the OP having to know the definitions of multiple terms.  However it is a common belief among Users that a HD with an installed Operating System can simply be moved to another computer and work.  They don't know about the "marriage" part, and the chipset drivers, etc... so heading this possibility off as soon as possible is important, otherwise we could get 10 posts into the thread and THEN discover that's what's going on.


Edited by hamluis, 18 June 2017 - 04:25 AM.


#9 jwoods301

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 03:15 AM

Not saying you're wrong, I just didn't see any evidence from the OP to go down that rat hole.



#10 001dek

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 10:19 AM

The computer in question was preloaded w/win xp  pro. I have a win xp pro bootable disk which was provided me. I received no documentation when I received the computer and it functioned well for the time I needed it. I put it aside for several months and needed it again which is when I discovered the battery had died and everything now is the result. The only thing I've done inside the computer is to replace the 2032 battery and use the correct date. As mentioned earlier, the boot is set for a CD and I cannot change the boot order and no, I don't see a 60gb hdd listed. No wires have been pulled and everything except the battery is as it was when working properly.



#11 Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 10:45 AM

BIOS settings usually reset when the CMOS power is interrupted. BIOS can be corrupted due to a failure to properly "clear the CMOS".  I recommend you do this procedure properly, as this may be the reason why a good HD is not being recognized. After clearing you will need to go through those settings and make certain they are set correctly.  There may be a BIOS setting that prevents a good HD from being recognized.

 

If the BIOS is "good" and the HD is not recognized, the list of other alternatives is short. Bad cable, disconnected cable, jumper configuration not correct, no power on the HD's power cable, bad data socket (probably IDE) on the motherboard. If all of these things are good, chances are the HD is bad.  If a HD cannot be recognized in BIOS, there's no repair for it at all.  Getting the HD recognized in BIOS is everything.  If that fails, there's the XP Installation Disk is useless.  You have to have a working hard drive.


Edited by hamluis, 18 June 2017 - 12:56 PM.


#12 001dek

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 09:28 PM

How do I properly clear and reset the CMOS?



#13 jwoods301

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Posted 18 June 2017 - 10:29 PM

How do I properly clear and reset the CMOS?

 

What makes you think you need to do that?



#14 001dek

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 04:02 PM

The only thing I've done inside the computer is to replace the 2032 battery and use the correct date. As mentioned earlier, the boot is set for a CD and I cannot change the boot order and no, I don't see a 60gb hdd listed. No wires have been pulled and everything except the battery is as it was when working properly. I have not touched the hdd.

Here's what I have done -

Tried to reload wxp w/ a bootable CD and it goes through the machinations and afterward, goes back to the black screen - diskette drive 0 seek failure

 

It then asks if I want to continue which just brings me back to the above or enter the BIOS.

This how the BIOS reads

  Boot Sequence

1. Diskette Dr              - Not Present (NP)

2. HD                           - NP

3. CD/DVD-RW Dr      -

4. Non Integrated NIC - NP

5. USB-FDD                - NP

6. USB-ZIP                  - NP

7. USB-CDROM          - NP

8. USB Device             - NP

 

   HDD Boot Sequence

1. Bootable add-in cards

 

   DRIVES

Diskette Dr

Drive 0 SATA - 0

Drive 1 SATA - 1

Smart Reporting

 

What to do next?

 

 



#15 jwoods301

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Posted 20 June 2017 - 04:09 PM

Under "normal" circumstances, you would need to move 3. CD/DVD-RW Dr  to 1.

 

However, the BIOS not recognizing the hard drive is a problem...indicates a drive failure.

 

See the first answer to this post on TechRepublc -

 

http://www.techrepublic.com/forums/discussions/how-can-i-fix-when-a-hard-drive-is-not-recognized-by-bios/


Edited by jwoods301, 20 June 2017 - 04:16 PM.





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