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PC shuts down while gaming


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#1 HotwellsShootin

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Posted 14 June 2017 - 09:05 PM

Recently I built a new PC which has since given me a very frustrating problem, it shuts down while gaming, the sole purpose of its creation. I first believed this to be a power supply issue, which I addressed by purchasing the biggest and most powerful PSU corsair offers. Since then the problem persists. Upon shutdown, the PC seems to be fine and in working order, but if I attempt to power it on using the button on the motherboard or case, it gets a flash of power, then returns to a state of no lights, no power to anything, and a red light appears on my PSU. I have been told this is a power supply issue which I've dismissed because it has happened with two power supplies at this point. I attempted to find the root of the problem by unplugging the cables one by one to find the defective component, and have found that removing the main power cable to the mobo removes the red light from my PSU. To actually power my PC up after this takes place, I must flip the switch on the PSU to the off position, and then back on. I have no idea what is going on at this point and could use some help.

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#2 MDD1963

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 02:21 AM

Motherboard must also be capable of supplying the GPU quality/sufficient power thru PCI-ex16 slot....

 

I'd also check your BIOS settings as pertains to hardware thermal protection, and, double check your cpu or GPU are not overheating....

 

What is the CPU/mainboard/GPU in question? (Drop everything back to stock clocks/voltages, if not already so)

 

Remove all extra USB devices, wifi /USB add-in cards,  and unnecessary bling LED strips/ extraneous fans while troubleshooting....

 

(Admittedly, two straight bad PSUs seems unlikely; do you have anyone willing to test your GPU in their board?)


Asus Z270A Prime/7700K/32 GB DDR4-3200/GTX1060


#3 Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 02:57 AM

That sounds EXACTLY like heat.  That "Power on" flash, then immediate shut down is the CPU temp sensor saying NO.  Post temps from BIOS.  Install Speccy and post it's log.  Also post voltages from BIOS just in case.  Keep a constant eye on that CPU fan and see if it's always spinning.  Make sure you CPU Fan Failure Alarm setting in BIOS is ENABLED.  Report here what your BIOS's "high temp shut down" temperature is set for.  It might just be too low.  You should also have a "warning" temperature where the thing starts squaking above "xxs" degrees.

 

A lot of Users assume new equipment is good equipment and so mentally they choose to ignore signs that are right there in front of them, so "review the tape" and think about all the things that you didn't think was worth thinking about, because after all everything was shiny and NEW, it couldn't be bad hardware.

 

Chances are it's bad hardware.

 

Did you apply thermal compound?  If so, what kind, what method and how much?


Edited by Aaron_Warrior, 15 June 2017 - 03:01 AM.


#4 HotwellsShootin

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 02:00 PM

Motherboard must also be capable of supplying the GPU quality/sufficient power thru PCI-ex16 slot....
 
I'd also check your BIOS settings as pertains to hardware thermal protection, and, double check your cpu or GPU are not overheating....
 
What is the CPU/mainboard/GPU in question? (Drop everything back to stock clocks/voltages, if not already so)
 
Remove all extra USB devices, wifi /USB add-in cards,  and unnecessary bling LED strips/ extraneous fans while troubleshooting....
 
(Admittedly, two straight bad PSUs seems unlikely; do you have anyone willing to test your GPU in their board?)


The board in question is an Asus ROG Maximus IX Code, and just recently I tried switching the PCIE slot that the GPU sat in, and left it on overnight running the witcher 3, I believed it to be fixed as it ran for 14+ hours without shutdown, but as I began to play it shut down within about 20-30 minutes. When I boot up the BIOS post indicated an "overclock 9%" next to the brand name, the CPU should not be overclocked and the GPU is an aftermarket card that is overclocked out of the box (gigabyte Aorus 11G GeForce GTX 1080 Ti). Should I return the voltage of the card to the same as that of the FE as the base overclock may be unstable? I'm sure my CPU isn't overheating because I have a closed loop water cooler that constantly works.

#5 Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 02:16 PM

The board in question is an Asus ROG Maximus IX Code, and just recently I tried switching the PCIE slot that the GPU sat in, and left it on overnight running the witcher 3, I believed it to be fixed as it ran for 14+ hours without shutdown, but as I began to play it shut down within about 20-30 minutes. When I boot up the BIOS post indicated an "overclock 9%" next to the brand name, the CPU should not be overclocked and the GPU is an aftermarket card that is overclocked out of the box (gigabyte Aorus 11G GeForce GTX 1080 Ti). Should I return the voltage of the card to the same as that of the FE as the base overclock may be unstable? I'm sure my CPU isn't overheating because I have a closed loop water cooler that constantly works.

 

You can only be certain your system isn't overheating because the temperature sensor says you aren't.  Those types of "inferential conclusions" are usually the 1st step towards a whole lot of wasted time.  Example:  "I know my power supply isn't bad because I bought it just last week.". or "I know my memory is good because it's G. Skill.".

 

What if the thermal interface between your CPU and Heat Sink has failed for some reason?  Is the video card also water cooled?  Heat issue could also apply to the GPU.

 

Did you delibarately overclock anything?  Or is all this mention of "overclock" what the manufacturer did from the factory?  Much of "overclocking" is marketing, meaning they throw the word around to get Gamers all jazzed-up on the idea of "overclocking", but REAL overclocking means RISK, and it also means operating outside of manufacturer's specifications which means that anything can happen to include destroying every single component in the system, so as long as we have the word "overclock" in the thread and applying to this system, we need to know if this is "marketing" overclocking, or really dangerous and bad overclocking.

 

If we're in the "B" zone, the system needs to be tuned back down to 100% factory specification as it is pointless to try to troubleshoot a system that is operating outside of factory spec.

 

Also I asked you about thermal compound.


Edited by Aaron_Warrior, 15 June 2017 - 02:18 PM.


#6 GoofProg

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 03:56 PM

Recently I built a new PC which has since given me a very frustrating problem, it shuts down while gaming, the sole purpose of its creation. I first believed this to be a power supply issue, which I addressed by purchasing the biggest and most powerful PSU corsair offers. Since then the problem persists. Upon shutdown, the PC seems to be fine and in working order, but if I attempt to power it on using the button on the motherboard or case, it gets a flash of power, then returns to a state of no lights, no power to anything, and a red light appears on my PSU. I have been told this is a power supply issue which I've dismissed because it has happened with two power supplies at this point. I attempted to find the root of the problem by unplugging the cables one by one to find the defective component, and have found that removing the main power cable to the mobo removes the red light from my PSU. To actually power my PC up after this takes place, I must flip the switch on the PSU to the off position, and then back on. I have no idea what is going on at this point and could use some help.

If it shuts down then you won the game already.  (I know what you are thinking)
Probably every game has the same problem which tell me you are done with gaming.  Just done with it.

1. Does it go to sleep or hibernation?  
a. Try to turn off screensaver and just leave screenlock.



#7 HotwellsShootin

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 04:19 PM

 

Did you delibarately overclock anything?  Or is all this mention of "overclock" what the manufacturer did from the factory?  Much of "overclocking" is marketing, meaning they throw the word around to get Gamers all jazzed-up on the idea of "overclocking", but REAL overclocking means RISK, and it also means operating outside of manufacturer's specifications which means that anything can happen to include destroying every single component in the system, so as long as we have the word "overclock" in the thread and applying to this system, we need to know if this is "marketing" overclocking, or really dangerous and bad overclocking.
 
If we're in the "B" zone, the system needs to be tuned back down to 100% factory specification as it is pointless to try to troubleshoot a system that is operating outside of factory spec.
 
Also I asked you about thermal compound.

All of the "overclocking" is manufacturer, I haven't touched anything to do with clock speeds or voltage, the card came straight from gigabyte and went into my system that's it. The GPU runs at a steady 70-80 Celsius when at 100% load, and I applied the thermal paste myself, forgot what kind but it was high end as it cost me five dollars for the tube, I used the pea sized blob in the middle method.


Edited by hamluis, 18 June 2017 - 10:10 AM.


#8 Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 06:15 PM

Okay then if it's not heat then it has to be power or memory.  We need some kind of software that reports temps while in Windows.  Have you run memtest yet?



#9 HotwellsShootin

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 06:52 PM

Yes, memtest came back fine, and I have about 3-4 application I use to record temps while in windows and while gaming (displays in top right corner while gaming, gives CPU Temp and usage % or load as well as GPU temp and usage % or load)


Edited by hamluis, 16 June 2017 - 03:33 PM.


#10 MDD1963

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 02:29 AM

Start searching your BIOS for assorted options, and get everything back to default cpu clocks/multipliers, default core voltages, etc...

 

Then retest....


Asus Z270A Prime/7700K/32 GB DDR4-3200/GTX1060


#11 HotwellsShootin

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 01:45 PM

Last night I did so, setting all BIOS settings involving CPU and GPU to defaults, and I did get it to play the witcher 3 for about 8-9 hours straight without problems. I will try again multiple times and let you know what happens over the next few days.


Edited by hamluis, 16 June 2017 - 03:33 PM.


#12 Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

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Posted 17 June 2017 - 11:42 PM

Best way I know to truly stress a system is to download and install a small program called "Prime95".  I get all my stuff from majorgeeks and you should use the "blended" test to really stress both CPU and memory.  Not sure if it does video stressing.  Also don't know how long you should run it.  If it continues to freeze or otherwise have problems then I'd want to see what happens to volts and temps during stress testing.  Still don't know of a program where you can monitor these things "live".


Edited by hamluis, 18 June 2017 - 10:11 AM.





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