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data recovery from Windows 10


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#1 sivaprakashPB

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Posted 13 June 2017 - 02:26 AM

i was using windows 10 and i tried to make my system a dual boot Ubuntu along with windows.but during the process i lost windows 10 OS and all my data in the hard disk and the system became Ubuntu.
how can i recover those data's like they where before?
if i switch to windows 10 can i recover my all data's?

Edited by Al1000, 13 June 2017 - 08:12 AM.
Moved from Windows 10 Support


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#2 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 13 June 2017 - 05:47 AM

More than likely all of the data is permentatly gone that is why it is preached repeatedly to back up any data that you may have on your C: drive BEFORE you attempt to dual boot. I will not ask you why you keep data on your C: drive, because I have never kept one bit of data on my C: drive, but I will remind you that if you are going to play with dual booting and partitions that you have to prepare in advance.

 

The best oppotunity to recover any lost data that was on your previous Windows installation is by using tools from within your Ubuntu installation because any further mucking around with your drive will further decrease the chances of data recovery. To do this you might want to ask your question at a Linux site.

 

Good luck with your situation and I hope that somebody can jump in here and offer you some more optimistic advice.


594965_zpsp5exvyzm.png


#3 mikey11

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Posted 13 June 2017 - 07:43 AM

chances are you can not recover anything,

 

in this day and age with all the viruses and ransomware going around it boggles my mind to think people are not doing regular backups



#4 JohnC_21

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Posted 13 June 2017 - 08:00 AM

However slight your Windows partition may be intact if you picked the option to install Ubuntu along side Windows and for some reason the grub boot loader failed to add the Windows install. I would recommend you post this question in the BC Linux Forum. They will have you input some commands in terminal to find out if the Windows partition is intact.


Edited by JohnC_21, 13 June 2017 - 08:04 AM.


#5 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 13 June 2017 - 11:19 AM

However slight your Windows partition may be intact if you picked the option to install Ubuntu along side Windows and for some reason the grub boot loader failed to add the Windows install. I would recommend you post this question in the BC Linux Forum. They will have you input some commands in terminal to find out if the Windows partition is intact.

 

 

John has a very valid point. What makes you think that your Windows partition has been wiped clean? I agree with John that maybe it is just a boot issue and you can fix it with Grub.


594965_zpsp5exvyzm.png


#6 NickAu

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Posted 13 June 2017 - 05:41 PM

Hi

 

How did you install Linux? Did you follow a tutorial? If so can you give me the link please?



#7 pcpunk

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Posted 14 June 2017 - 12:49 AM

In addition to providing the Link you used to install, you could run this command in the Ubuntu Terminal, then Copy Paste the outcome to your next post.  This should show all the partitions that exist now.  You should also see your Windows Drive in the File Manager but I'm not familiar with Ubuntu.  

sudo parted -l   

sBCcBvM.png

Created by Mike_Walsh

 

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eps2.4_m4ster-s1ave.aes_pcpunk_leavemehere

 


#8 NickAu

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Posted 14 June 2017 - 01:28 AM

You should also see your Windows Drive in the File Manager but I'm not familiar with Ubuntu.

It should show under devices and on your launcher panel
screenshot-from-2017-06-14-16%3A24%3A56.

#9 sivaprakashPB

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Posted 14 June 2017 - 04:36 AM

More than likely all of the data is permentatly gone that is why it is preached repeatedly to back up any data that you may have on your C: drive BEFORE you attempt to dual boot. I will not ask you why you keep data on your C: drive, because I have never kept one bit of data on my C: drive, but I will remind you that if you are going to play with dual booting and partitions that you have to prepare in advance.

 

The best oppotunity to recover any lost data that was on your previous Windows installation is by using tools from within your Ubuntu installation because any further mucking around with your drive will further decrease the chances of data recovery. To do this you might want to ask your question at a Linux site.

 

Good luck with your situation and I hope that somebody can jump in here and offer you some more optimistic advice.

the data i lost is not only from C drive but E and D drive too



#10 sivaprakashPB

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Posted 14 June 2017 - 04:38 AM

I

 

However slight your Windows partition may be intact if you picked the option to install Ubuntu along side Windows and for some reason the grub boot loader failed to add the Windows install. I would recommend you post this question in the BC Linux Forum. They will have you input some commands in terminal to find out if the Windows partition is intact

I'll try that Thanks John



#11 sivaprakashPB

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Posted 14 June 2017 - 04:39 AM

its

 

Hi

 

How did you install Linux? Did you follow a tutorial? If so can you give me the link please?

 its done by my friend , he done dual boot on his system weeks before this incident but something went wrong now



#12 sivaprakashPB

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Posted 14 June 2017 - 04:42 AM

in

 

 

You should also see your Windows Drive in the File Manager but I'm not familiar with Ubuntu.

It should show under devices and on your launcher panel
screenshot-from-2017-06-14-16%3A24%3A56.

 

in that panel i have only one partition and it is Computer



#13 NickAu

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Posted 14 June 2017 - 05:17 AM

Hi

 

Can you please open terminal and run this command as pc punk suggested, them post the output here.

sudo parted -l   

Edited by NickAu, 14 June 2017 - 05:21 AM.


#14 jasonemurray

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Posted 14 June 2017 - 09:47 PM

I use a program called GetDataBack (I know, great name right).  It has worked great in recovering files from systems that were not bootable, and some that would pop up as needing to be formatted.

 

I remember it being fairly cheap when I first purchased it.



#15 cat1092

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 04:04 AM

There is also MiniTool Power Data Recovery Wizard, as well as their (older) editions of MiniTool Partition Wizard that can scan for lost partitions & possibly recover. You'd need to perform the deep scan, drive by drive, if the partitions are on separate ones. Otherwise, the software will scan the entire drive for all lost partitions. 

 

Link to bootable ISO of the earlier MiniTool Partition Wizard. Note that you'll likely need to delete your Ubuntu partitions before preceding, as a partition won't be recovered over an active one, and that MiniTool no longer distributes these beginning with version 10, 9.1 was the end of the line for free bootable media, which one can do a lot with. :)

 

http://downloads.tomsguide.com/MiniTool-Partition-Wizard-Bootable-CD,0301-51034.html

 

Oddly, this is from a list of software that includes a utility to access Linux files from Windows (ExtFS for Windows). :lol:

 

http://downloads.tomsguide.com/Software-Hard-Drives-and-Peripherals,0702-7095-2.html

 

BTW, almost forgot my manners,  :welcome: to the Linux Community of Bleeping Computer Forums! :)

 

Am sorry that this incident happened, yet you should allow this to be a learning experience, always image your drive(s) before installing Linux, where possible, disconnect those not to be used. Macrium Reflect Free is a great backup choice & features not only WinPE Media, which requires a small download from Microsoft (175MB for W7 to just under 550MB for W10, depending on OS. I forget what 8.1 requires, somewhere in between. There is also an option under 'Other Tasks' to create a boot menu entry for the ultimate in speed backup/restore operations, the software can be used for cloning also. However, that menu is not a substitute for creating a bootable ISO to store on an external drive, which can be then used in an emergency. 

 

While I enjoy & regularly use the convenience of the boot menu option for scheduled (weekly or bi-weekly) backup images, there's times when I still need the media. Example, if I remove a OS drive in use, place in a USB 3.0 docking station (where it can't boot), then clone to a newer/larger/faster HDD/SSD. Macrium issues TRIM passes along the way while cloning for SSD's, and all partitions, regardless of SSD or HDD, will be aligned, preventing excessive wear on the SSD, boosting performance on the HDD by not having to perform two writes constantly. Or if working on another's computer, will usually perform a drive image before anything else. Here's the software & no 3rd party software, including toolbars, are added. Registration during install is optional, not required. :)

 

http://filehippo.com/download_macrium_reflect/

 

At today's all time lows on external drives, there's little excuse, unless unemployed, not to have one. In case of financial hardship or if one asks me what's wanted or needed for the holiday season or birthday, whatever I need tech wise is what I say & how I obtained my first (& only) retail backup drive. Today, my preference is to build my own from 'retired' drives in an enclosure, once I upgrade to larger/faster drives, which is regularly, although will slow on this now, as I have a glut of 1TiB HDD's on hand. However, these won't collect rust, will be used as more backup drives, or who knows when I may perform a future build & having healthy Data drives won't be a financial burden, can upgrade afterwards. :)

 

Anyway, I'd say to download that partition ISO, which has to either be burned to a CD (DVD is also OK), or use Rufus, of which you may have already used at some point, to create a bootable USB stick. You may need to disable Secure Boot to use the media, if enabled, and my preference is to leave it that way, 'removing the shackles' so to speak. :lol:

 

https://rufus.akeo.ie/

 

Am hoping that you can fully recover your partition table, or at least enough to get your data. Windows 10 can be freely downloaded & will activate when you install the OS & before you're actually online (as in using a browser or on the desktop), your COA is embedded in the UEFI, somewhere. So regardless, you can freely download the latest Windows 10 ISO (make sure you select the correct bit version), and to create an ISO rather than upgrade, in your situation, no other choice, if the partition(s) can't be recovered. 

 

Good Luck & please let us know the outcome, this is how we can be helpful to others. Knowledge is Power! :)

 

Cat


Performing full disc images weekly and keeping important data off of the 'C' drive as generated can be the best defence against Malware/Ransomware attacks, as well as a wide range of other issues. 





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