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Backing up MacBook Pro in case I need to re-install OS


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#1 huntsin2

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Posted 12 June 2017 - 08:27 PM

Hi,

I have a new MacBook Pro, and so far it seems to be working well.

I backed up the MBP to an external hdd using Acronis. I backed it up a second time and it appears that Acronis got rid of the first backup. I changed the settings before the second backup so it shouldn't have done that.

Anyways, I'm just wondering if I ever needed to restore the backup from a boot mode how I would do that? I don't believe the Acronis software for Mac has a bootable feature.

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#2 Tech-Junky

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Posted 12 June 2017 - 08:32 PM

Mac can recover at boot by downloading install image over the internet. 

 

http://www.idownloadblog.com/2016/02/25/how-to-start-up-your-mac-in-internet-recovery-mode/


Edited by Tech-Junky, 12 June 2017 - 08:33 PM.


#3 smax013

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Posted 12 June 2017 - 10:49 PM

I am not familiar with Acronis' backup program for the Mac, so I do not know what options it may or may not offer.

In general, there are a number of ways to do this on a Mac if your backup program does not come with bootable media nor allows you to make bootable media specific to the program.

The first is to reinstall the macOS from either the recovery partition (accessed by holding down Command-R during boot up) or Internet recovery (by holding down Option-Command-R if your Mac supports it) or a recovery or install disc (for older Macs, in general Macs that originally shipped with a version of macOS prior to Lion, aka 10.7, but there are some exceptions as some of these pre-Lion Macs could install a firmware update to add Internet recovery to that Mac). After you reinstall the macOS, you can then install the backup program and then restore your data from the backup. It looks like you can get more details on the recovery partition and Internet recovery from the link provided by Tech-Junky.

The second option is to clone the drive to the backup drive if your backup program offers that ability. The clone should then be bootable as it should be an exact copy of the Mac's internal drive. So, you should be able to plug in that backup drive and boot from it. Once you boot to that backup clone drive, you can then clone back from that backup drive to the internal drive.

The third option is to make your backup drive bootable by installing the macOS on to it. As long as the version of the macOS you install on an external drive is newer than the version that Mac originally shipped with when that Mac was shipped new, you will be able to boot that Mac from that external drive...no matter the Mac. If you then have the backup program installed on that "minimal" macOS install on that external drive, you can then using it to restore backups to the internal drive. FWIW, you can also use this drive as a "rescue" program drive. So, if you buy/get some disk utility program (like TechTool Pro, DiskWarrior, or DriveGenius as examples) or want to have a program like Malwarebytes AntiMalware, you can install those programs on the bootable backup drive to repair disks or scan for malware if you ever have issues with the internal drive.

The last option is to ditch using Acronis and use another backup program that does offer some sort of bootable media. A variation on this is to just use Time Machine, the backup utility built into the macOS. Time Machine has the advantage of also offering versioning (i.e. saving multiple versions of documents). And both the recovery partition and Internet recovery offer the ability to restore from a backup during the reinstall of the macOS, if memory serves.

If you have any questions about the options I have offered, other will have to provide the answers as I will be pulling back from the forums for an indefinite period of time due to personal reasons. Best of luck with the new MacBook Pro.

#4 huntsin2

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Posted 13 June 2017 - 06:50 PM

Thanks for the replies :)




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