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Change Microsoft Account Linked To My Computer


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#1 UM Wolverine

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Posted 11 June 2017 - 01:51 PM

Hello everyone.

 

For background information purposes, I'm currently running Windows 10 and I have applied all updates.

 

This is what I am trying to accomplish.

 

I want to change the Microsoft account that is linked to my computer to a different Microsoft account which I have already created.

 

As an example, I currently log on to my computer using ABC@outlook.com. I created a completely separate new Microsoft account (XYZ@outlook.com as an example) and that is the account that I want my computer linked to as opposed to ABC@outlook.com, but I cannot determine how to do that.  I hoping that someone her can help. Please let me know.

 

 



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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 11 June 2017 - 02:28 PM

Hope this is what you are looking for.

 

http://www.thewindowsclub.com/change-primary-email-address-microsoft-account



#3 britechguy

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Posted 11 June 2017 - 03:18 PM

John,

 

          I don't think it is, and I'll tell you why.   If you already have two Microsoft Accounts, and I mean "on the Microsoft website" accounts, one using ABC@outlook.com and the other using XYZ@outlook.com and both as primary logins you cannot set either address as an alias in the other, for obvious reasons.  You can't have one account using the address for another account as its alias.  You can use as many e-mail addresses not used either as a primary account alias or a secondary through nth-ary aliases for any other accounts.

 

          I have two Microsoft Accounts using two Gmail addresses, and I have both of those accounts linked to their "mirror Windows 10 user accounts" on my local machine.  If I try to go in to the Microsoft Account using the procedure outlined, when I enter the e-mail address of the other as an alias I get a message back saying, "This email address is taken, please try another."

 

          What it sounds like will be necessary is one of two things.  One could convert the Windows 10 User Account that exists under ABC@outlook.com to a local account, then convert it back to a Microsoft Account linked account but use the XYZ@outlook.com as the Microsoft Account to link to.  To me this is the messier of the two options.

 

           The other would be to create a second Windows 10 user account that's linked to the second Microsoft Account which uses XYZ@outlook.com as it's Microsoft login id.  Copy over any user files wanted from the existing Windows 10 user account that already exists and is linked to Microsoft Account ABC@outlook.com.  Remove Windows 10 user account that is linked to Microsoft Account ABC@outlook.com, leaving only the account on the machine that is linked to XYZ@outlook.com.

 

            Either way should work.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

             ~ Brian Vogel

 

 

 

              

 


#4 UM Wolverine

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Posted 11 June 2017 - 03:27 PM

John,

 

          I don't think it is, and I'll tell you why.   If you already have two Microsoft Accounts, and I mean "on the Microsoft website" accounts, one using ABC@outlook.com and the other using XYZ@outlook.com and both as primary logins you cannot set either address as an alias in the other, for obvious reasons.  You can't have one account using the address for another account as its alias.  You can use as many e-mail addresses not used either as a primary account alias or a secondary through nth-ary aliases for any other accounts.

 

          I have two Microsoft Accounts using two Gmail addresses, and I have both of those accounts linked to their "mirror Windows 10 user accounts" on my local machine.  If I try to go in to the Microsoft Account using the procedure outlined, when I enter the e-mail address of the other as an alias I get a message back saying, "This email address is taken, please try another."

 

          What it sounds like will be necessary is one of two things.  One could convert the Windows 10 User Account that exists under ABC@outlook.com to a local account, then convert it back to a Microsoft Account linked account but use the XYZ@outlook.com as the Microsoft Account to link to.  To me this is the messier of the two options.

 

           The other would be to create a second Windows 10 user account that's linked to the second Microsoft Account which uses XYZ@outlook.com as it's Microsoft login id.  Copy over any user files wanted from the existing Windows 10 user account that already exists and is linked to Microsoft Account ABC@outlook.com.  Remove Windows 10 user account that is linked to Microsoft Account ABC@outlook.com, leaving only the account on the machine that is linked to XYZ@outlook.com.

 

            Either way should work.

 

John,

 

          I don't think it is, and I'll tell you why.   If you already have two Microsoft Accounts, and I mean "on the Microsoft website" accounts, one using ABC@outlook.com and the other using XYZ@outlook.com and both as primary logins you cannot set either address as an alias in the other, for obvious reasons.  You can't have one account using the address for another account as its alias.  You can use as many e-mail addresses not used either as a primary account alias or a secondary through nth-ary aliases for any other accounts.

 

          I have two Microsoft Accounts using two Gmail addresses, and I have both of those accounts linked to their "mirror Windows 10 user accounts" on my local machine.  If I try to go in to the Microsoft Account using the procedure outlined, when I enter the e-mail address of the other as an alias I get a message back saying, "This email address is taken, please try another."

 

          What it sounds like will be necessary is one of two things.  One could convert the Windows 10 User Account that exists under ABC@outlook.com to a local account, then convert it back to a Microsoft Account linked account but use the XYZ@outlook.com as the Microsoft Account to link to.  To me this is the messier of the two options.

 

           The other would be to create a second Windows 10 user account that's linked to the second Microsoft Account which uses XYZ@outlook.com as it's Microsoft login id.  Copy over any user files wanted from the existing Windows 10 user account that already exists and is linked to Microsoft Account ABC@outlook.com.  Remove Windows 10 user account that is linked to Microsoft Account ABC@outlook.com, leaving only the account on the machine that is linked to XYZ@outlook.com.

 

            Either way should work.

 

 

Thank you for the guidance.


 

Thank you.



#5 UM Wolverine

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Posted 12 June 2017 - 04:22 AM

Thank you again for your response; however, I have a follow-up question.

 

I created the new account as you suggested, but I have not deleted the old one yet. You mentioned copying files from the old user account to the new user account. How do I do this?

 

Do I need to:

(1) Copy them to an external drive first;

(2) Delete them from the computer; 

(3) Delete the old user account;  and then

(4) Copy them back to computer using the new account?

 

Is there a way to copy the files from the old user account to the new user account directly on the machine without first copying them to an external drive? If so, can you provide me with some guidance on how to accomplish this?

 

 



#6 britechguy

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Posted 12 June 2017 - 09:05 AM

Provided the new account has administrator privileges you can copy directly from one account to another.

 

Individual user account data folders  are located under c:\Users in a folder with the same name as the user account or a pretty obvious shortened version (for users that use an e-mail address as login).

 

So, lets say you have user "Garry" and "Mike" under C:\Users.  You can open up side-by-side File Explorer Windows for each and you'll see their respective Desktop, Documents, Pictures, etc., folders.  I tend to do one folder at a time where I open the Documents folder in each Window then select the files from the source Documents folder and copy them to the destination documents folder.  Lather rinse repeat.

 

It never hurts, though, to have created an additional backup on an external hard drive for safekeeping until you are convinced that you didn't accidentally forget anything or to maintain the original account on the machine until you are convinced of same and only then delete it.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

             ~ Brian Vogel

 

 

 

              

 


#7 UM Wolverine

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Posted 12 June 2017 - 09:49 AM

Provided the new account has administrator privileges you can copy directly from one account to another.

 

Individual user account data folders  are located under c:\Users in a folder with the same name as the user account or a pretty obvious shortened version (for users that use an e-mail address as login).

 

So, lets say you have user "Garry" and "Mike" under C:\Users.  You can open up side-by-side File Explorer Windows for each and you'll see their respective Desktop, Documents, Pictures, etc., folders.  I tend to do one folder at a time where I open the Documents folder in each Window then select the files from the source Documents folder and copy them to the destination documents folder.  Lather rinse repeat.

 

It never hurts, though, to have created an additional backup on an external hard drive for safekeeping until you are convinced that you didn't accidentally forget anything or to maintain the original account on the machine until you are convinced of same and only then delete it.

 

Thanks again for taking time to help me Brian

 

What you described is what I was expecting; however, I only see the original account under C:\users. I don't see the new account that I created even though the new account has administrator privileges. I wonder what I have have done incorrectly or what I might be missing.

 

Sincerely,

Rick



#8 britechguy

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Posted 12 June 2017 - 09:54 AM

Have you logged in once under the new account?

 

It would not be odd for the original account to be "Default" but all other accounts that have been accessed should have a folder under C:\Users.  In fact, must have a folder under C:\Users.

 

I do not believe this gets set up until the initial log in, where you spend quite a bit of time with Windows 10 "getting ready" and singing its own praises while it prepares things for the new user.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

             ~ Brian Vogel

 

 

 

              

 


#9 UM Wolverine

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Posted 12 June 2017 - 10:13 AM

Have you logged in once under the new account?

 

It would not be odd for the original account to be "Default" but all other accounts that have been accessed should have a folder under C:\Users.  In fact, must have a folder under C:\Users.

 

I do not believe this gets set up until the initial log in, where you spend quite a bit of time with Windows 10 "getting ready" and singing its own praises while it prepares things for the new user.

 

I have not yet logged in using the new account. I wanted to do that, but here is what happened: 

 

1. I was logged in under the old account.

2. I logged off from the old account.

3. I then clicked on the log on button, but the system "assumed" I was logging in under the old account. I could not find anywhere to input the new user account ID. The only input field that was available on the screen was for the password.

 

Do you know how to switch the account ID so that I can log on using the new account?



#10 britechguy

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Posted 12 June 2017 - 10:21 AM

Yes.  When you log out, if you look at the lower left hand corner of the main lock/login screen, you will see a list of the users on the given machine.

 

If you click on one of the alternatives to the one you just logged out of you will be presented with the Password entry for *that* user.  If you don't select one of the alternatives and just hit enter Windows 10 simply defaults to whatever user you were last logged in as, which is what is happening to you.

 

You don't enter the userids in a text field.  You select them from the list at the lower left of the screen.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

             ~ Brian Vogel

 

 

 

              

 


#11 UM Wolverine

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Posted 12 June 2017 - 10:25 AM

Yes.  When you log out, if you look at the lower left hand corner of the main lock/login screen, you will see a list of the users on the given machine.

 

If you click on one of the alternatives to the one you just logged out of you will be presented with the Password entry for *that* user.  If you don't select one of the alternatives and just hit enter Windows 10 simply defaults to whatever user you were last logged in as, which is what is happening to you.

 

You don't enter the userids in a text field.  You select them from the list at the lower left of the screen.

 

 

Got it.

 

I am out of town this entire week. I return home late on Friday at which time I will follow the steps you just described. Thanks once more for your time. I will let you know how it goes, although I suspect there will be no issues.

 

Sincerely,

 

Rick



#12 britechguy

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Posted 12 June 2017 - 10:37 AM

You're quite welcome.

 

Please do report back.   It's helpful to future readers to know whether something worked, or didn't, though I have almost no doubt that this will resolve the issue you've been having.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

             ~ Brian Vogel

 

 

 

              

 


#13 UM Wolverine

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 04:49 AM

Hi Brian.

 

It's all working as you said. Thanks once more your time and assistance.



#14 britechguy

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 08:15 AM

You're quite welcome.

 

I have actually come to despise the fact that Microsoft itself (or at least it would seem) adopted the term "Microsoft Account" not only for an actual account on the Microsoft site but also for a Windows 10 user account that is linked to a specific Microsoft Account.  It makes it very confusing because people believe that they are one and the same when they are not.

 

Be aware that you can change your Windows 10 Microsoft-Account-Linked user account password completely independently of your actual Microsoft Account password and vice versa.   If you change your actual Microsoft Account password at any point Windows 10 will begin to nag you to verify your account (as in the link between the Win10 user account and Microsoft Account) which requires you to re-enter the password for said Microsoft Account to reestablish the linkage.  This, also, is completely independent of the actual password for that Windows 10 user account.

 

The above gets really messy when people don't realize it and most have established a Windows 10 user account and their first Microsoft Account when setting up Windows 10 for the first time using a single e-mail address.  It reinforces the false belief that it's all "one big ball of wax" when it isn't.

 

Both my true Microsoft Account and my Windows 10 User Account that links to it both use the same e-mail address.  Each has its own separate password and I had to verify again once I changed the password on the true Microsoft account.


Edited by britechguy, 16 June 2017 - 08:16 AM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

     Presenting the willfully ignorant with facts is the very definition of casting pearls before swine.

             ~ Brian Vogel

 

 

 

              

 





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