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Mouse wire soldering


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#1 hellhound

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 02:10 PM

Hello,I recently took a cable from another mouse to put on a non working mouse but they have different wire colors and I got confused.Hope you guys can help me out.
As you can see ,I already soldered the green to green and red to red,as I thought they both corespond to 5V,and data - but on the mouse I have another white,black and black but the cable has another black ,blue and ground I think(no color).

The second image wn't load so here s a link to it:

http://imgur.com/a/QJHrQ

Attached Files


Edited by hellhound, 10 June 2017 - 02:31 PM.

What is the difference between a snowman and a snowwoman?

Snowballs.

 


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#2 Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 02:35 PM

If this is a PS/2 mouse, use a multimeter and compare the two PS/2 connectors. Which wire goes to which pin on cable "A" will tell you which wire goes to which wire on cable "B".  It's a semi-circle, and they might even be numbered 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, etc... example 7 o'clock is "1", 9 o'clock is "2" etc...  Use the pins on the connectors as a common point of reference for both cables.



#3 hellhound

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 02:38 PM

If this is a PS/2 mouse, use a multimeter and compare the two PS/2 connectors. Which wire goes to which pin on cable "A" will tell you which wire goes to which wire on cable "B".  It's a semi-circle, and they might even be numbered 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, etc... example 7 o'clock is "1", 9 o'clock is "2" etc...  Use the pins on the connectors as a common point of reference for both cables.

Thanks!
White was the ground,blue was data + and the other black the shield.
Have a good day!

What is the difference between a snowman and a snowwoman?

Snowballs.

 


#4 Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 06:09 PM

 

If this is a PS/2 mouse, use a multimeter and compare the two PS/2 connectors. Which wire goes to which pin on cable "A" will tell you which wire goes to which wire on cable "B".  It's a semi-circle, and they might even be numbered 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, etc... example 7 o'clock is "1", 9 o'clock is "2" etc...  Use the pins on the connectors as a common point of reference for both cables.

Thanks!
White was the ground,blue was data + and the other black the shield.
Have a good day!

 

Glad you got it fixed.  I hate soldering for this reason.






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