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Unexpected Shutdowns


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12 replies to this topic

#1 tsquared56

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 06:55 AM

For the past week or so I've noticed my computer being shut down when I know I didn't shut down, coupled with the Chrome popup of asking about restoring tabs that were open when it happened.

 

I suspect I have something going on when I put it to sleep that causes it to shut down for some reason, but is there a way to figure that out?  

 

Thanks.



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#2 Goddess_Bastet

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 07:17 AM

Check that the computer is not overheating - if the fans &/or vents are dirty/covered in fluff then it'll shutdown.
Also check that any backup software (or any other program) isn't set to shutdown after running. Ccleaner pro & Macrium reflect free can be configured to shutdown after running.
How are you putting the computer to sleep?

Edited by Goddess_Bastet, 10 June 2017 - 07:21 AM.


#3 tsquared56

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 08:37 AM

I can't imagine it's overheating because when I use it for gaming I monitor temps pretty regularly.  I'd think it would overheat during actual gaming and not when asleep if that were the case.

 

Start - Power - Sleep typically, I've also got it setup to auto-sleep after either 15 or 20 minutes of inactivity.  


Edited by tsquared56, 10 June 2017 - 08:42 AM.


#4 dc3

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 08:50 AM

How do you have the power settings set?

 

Do you have the computer configured to shut down at any point?


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#5 tsquared56

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Posted 11 June 2017 - 07:44 PM

I've got the screen set to shut off after 15 minutes and the PC to sleep never, which surprised me because I thought I had it set for 2 hours of inactivity, so I put it (back) to 2 hours.



#6 jwoods301

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Posted 13 June 2017 - 02:24 PM

I would be interested if there are any clues in the Windows Event Log...

 

The easiest way to check the Event logs is to do the following...

In Control Panel, navigate to Administrative Tools and click on Event Viewer.

Expand the Custom Views folder and click on Administrative Events.

The Administrative Events contain Warnings, Errors, and Critical events from all event logs.

Windows 10 -

In Control Panel, enter event in the top-right search box and click View event logs in the result.



#7 dc3

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Posted 13 June 2017 - 02:36 PM

I've got the screen set to shut off after 15 minutes and the PC to sleep never, which surprised me because I thought I had it set for 2 hours of inactivity, so I put it (back) to 2 hours.

What were the results after you changed those settings?


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#8 jasonemurray

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Posted 14 June 2017 - 09:44 PM

I have seen laptops running a few tabs (maybe 3-4) spike the CPU to the point that the fans kick up to high speed.  Perhaps your machine is overheating?



#9 dc3

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 11:00 AM

I would be interested if there are any clues in the Windows Event Log...

 

The easiest way to check the Event logs is to do the following...

In Control Panel, navigate to Administrative Tools and click on Event Viewer.

Expand the Custom Views folder and click on Administrative Events.

The Administrative Events contain Warnings, Errors, and Critical events from all event logs.

Windows 10 -

In Control Panel, enter event in the top-right search box and click View event logs in the result.

The Event Viewer can be really confusing, there are a lot of warnings, errors, and informational messages.  Without knowing what it all means, you can incorrectly assume that your computer is broken or infected when there’s nothing really wrong.

The events themselves are what you want to see, but the usefulness of these events can range from being very specific and obvious things that you can fix easily to the very vague messages that don’t make any sense and you can’t find any information on Google.

 

Unless you are experienced enough with determining which event errors are significant you may not find anything which is going to point you in a direction which will help with diagnosing issues with a computer.

 

Because of the ambiguities that are iherent in these event errors there are scammers out there who will access your computer with your permission and will quote event errors from the event viewer to convince you that your computer is infected and charge you to "repair" the computer.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#10 bwv848

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 11:40 AM

For the past week or so I've noticed my computer being shut down when I know I didn't shut down, coupled with the Chrome popup of asking about restoring tabs that were open when it happened.

 

I suspect I have something going on when I put it to sleep that causes it to shut down for some reason, but is there a way to figure that out?  

 

Thanks.

Curiously, do you have dumps in C:\Windows\Minidump? Perhaps Windows crashed when you were away for a while.


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#11 jwoods301

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 01:54 PM

 

I would be interested if there are any clues in the Windows Event Log...

 

The easiest way to check the Event logs is to do the following...

In Control Panel, navigate to Administrative Tools and click on Event Viewer.

Expand the Custom Views folder and click on Administrative Events.

The Administrative Events contain Warnings, Errors, and Critical events from all event logs.

Windows 10 -

In Control Panel, enter event in the top-right search box and click View event logs in the result.

The Event Viewer can be really confusing, there are a lot of warnings, errors, and informational messages.  Without knowing what it all means, you can incorrectly assume that your computer is broken or infected when there’s nothing really wrong.

The events themselves are what you want to see, but the usefulness of these events can range from being very specific and obvious things that you can fix easily to the very vague messages that don’t make any sense and you can’t find any information on Google.

 

Unless you are experienced enough with determining which event errors are significant you may not find anything which is going to point you in a direction which will help with diagnosing issues with a computer.

 

Because of the ambiguities that are iherent in these event errors there are scammers out there who will access your computer with your permission and will quote event errors from the event viewer to convince you that your computer is infected and charge you to "repair" the computer.

 

Could not disagree more...

 

Event logs are a major tool in troubleshooting Windows issues and should never be discounted.

 

Logs can be exported, and analyzed by more experienced users.

 

No different than the logs generated by the tools used in the Virus, Trojan, Spyware, and Malware Removal Logs forum.



#12 dc3

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 09:05 AM

 

 

I would be interested if there are any clues in the Windows Event Log...

 

The easiest way to check the Event logs is to do the following...

In Control Panel, navigate to Administrative Tools and click on Event Viewer.

Expand the Custom Views folder and click on Administrative Events.

The Administrative Events contain Warnings, Errors, and Critical events from all event logs.

Windows 10 -

In Control Panel, enter event in the top-right search box and click View event logs in the result.

The Event Viewer can be really confusing, there are a lot of warnings, errors, and informational messages.  Without knowing what it all means, you can incorrectly assume that your computer is broken or infected when there’s nothing really wrong.

The events themselves are what you want to see, but the usefulness of these events can range from being very specific and obvious things that you can fix easily to the very vague messages that don’t make any sense and you can’t find any information on Google.

 

Unless you are experienced enough with determining which event errors are significant you may not find anything which is going to point you in a direction which will help with diagnosing issues with a computer.

 

Because of the ambiguities that are iherent in these event errors there are scammers out there who will access your computer with your permission and will quote event errors from the event viewer to convince you that your computer is infected and charge you to "repair" the computer.

 

Could not disagree more...

 

Event logs are a major tool in troubleshooting Windows issues and should never be discounted.

 

Logs can be exported, and analyzed by more experienced users.

 

No different than the logs generated by the tools used in the Virus, Trojan, Spyware, and Malware Removal Logs forum.

 

Only if you know exactly what you are looking for.  Your average puter driver does not.


Family and loved ones will always be a priority in my daily life.  You never know when one will leave you.

 

 

 

 


#13 jwoods301

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 01:25 PM

"Only if you know exactly what you are looking for.  Your average puter driver does not."

 

Which is why I mentioned that logs can be exported and reviewed by more experienced users.

 

Again, no different than the logs generated by the tools used in the Virus, Trojan, Spyware, and Malware Removal Logs forum.






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