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All in one computer


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#1 B412

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 03:51 PM

So my wife and I are looking for a new computer. Few years ago we took advice from a best buy employee and bought a laptop there that has been the worst experience ever with the touch pad, it goes haywire all the time.

 

Anyway, so instead of going to best buy again for an opinion figured I would try here.

 

The reason I'm thinking of an all in one is for the room and lack of wires. We already have a ton of wires around where the computer is so the less the better.

 

I don't really know much about computers anymore, so I'm not sure whats good and whats not.

 

Basically would be using it for things like photoshop, internet, storing a lot of pictures/video clips, possibly music, maybe some gaming like the sims types of games, and also work (my wife will be working from home soon, another big reason we'll be getting another pc). So I guess we're looking for one that won't be slow loading programs, or lagging as we're using them.

 

I was told I should look into getting a pc with an SSD.

Something where I can plug another monitor in that my wife's work will be providing since they use double monitors.

Touch screen would be a plus.

 

Other than that I think that sums it up, biggest thing I guess would be price, would like to stay under $1,000 if possible.

 

I appreciate any help or feedback, thanks.


Edited by B412, 09 June 2017 - 03:56 PM.


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#2 hamluis

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 04:32 PM

Worth A Read

 

Worth A Read

 

Louis



#3 B412

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 06:59 PM

I did read that they weren't the greatest but I feel it's more convenient for us.

 

Any thoughts on specs for the stuff I mentioned that I would be good with? Is an i5 good enough for should I look for i7? How about memory, etc?

 

I was looking at this one from best buy, the down fall I saw from it I noticed no SSD (is it a big deal) and I think there was no HDMI IN, just out only.

 

http://www.bestbuy.com/site/hp-pavilion-27-touch-screen-all-in-one-intel-core-i7-12gb-memory-1tb-hard-drive-hp-finish-in-turbo-silver/5228111.p?skuId=5228111



#4 hamluis

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 06:23 AM

I cannot comment any further...I tend to think of all-in-ones as throway computers that are probably not as well-built as a laptop nor as mobile.  It I were so inclined to purchase that type of system...I would just buy a laptop, since they can be proven commodities that are designed to last longer than I believe that any all-in-one may be.

 

My premises may not be accurate but I favor desktops as my system of choice because of the ability to replace or upgrade parts without replacing the entire system and minus the cost of sending/taking the unit to a shop for any repairs that may become necessary.

 

Others here have more valid opinions and experiences :).

 

Louis



#5 RolandJS

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 08:38 AM

I'm sorry, I don't understand the term "all in one".  Meanwhile, I have two Acers that cost me $1100 and $1600 respectively, video and sound output is game-playing worthy.  Rock-solid for the last 6 years and 4 years respectively.  Even the keys still have their lettering.

 

"...Basically would be using it for things like photoshop, internet, storing a lot of pictures/video clips, possibly music, maybe some gaming like the sims types of games, and also work (my wife will be working from home soon, another big reason we'll be getting another pc). So I guess we're looking for one that won't be slow loading programs, or lagging as we're using them..."

If you want a computer, whether desktop or laptop, for both business and pleasure -- be prepared to spend some monies.   Along with the computer, invest in any sort of backup / restore / clone software, whether free or pay-for, and whatever external media you find affordable and trustworthy for the business data folders and files backup; I have two usb platter-driven pancake-size 1TB HDs dedicated for each computer -- however, that does not mean you have to do likewise  :) 


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)

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#6 ranchhand_

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 12:42 PM

The problem with all-in-one computers is exactly that....you are purchasing a big, clunky laptop. Essentially, everything is ram-jammed into the monitor casing. If the monitor ever fails (a common breakdown with computers) you are up a creek and looking for a new computer. I have had people want me to service their AIO computers, and I will not touch them. Even if I could figure out how to get the case open, I can only imagine the nightmare of attempting to access anything inside it without damaging the LED screen with even a simple fix.

Desktop computers are made to be opened and accessed so that failed parts can be replaced and hardware upgraded easily. To a limited extent, laptop computers are the same. Not so AIOs. So be warned.

 

I was told I should look into getting a pc with an SSD

You were told correctly; SSDs are much faster, take less space, run cooler, and are not prone to mechanical breakdown (since there are no mechanical moving parts).

 

Something where I can plug another monitor in

Make sure that which ever unit you buy has that option. If you look on the rear of the computer, there should be two (2) video ports available, but make sure and verify that you can use dual monitors. It should be detailed in the specifications.

 

Touch screen would be a plus.

Again, you have to purchase a unit that has that feature. Check first.

 

storing a lot of pictures/video clips, possibly music

Think large drives. Those three things you mentioned are the great white sharks of storage; they eat storage space wholesale. I strongly suggest the same as RolandSJ above. Get yourself a docking station, and a couple of 1TB hard drives and use those for storage. 500gigs will be full within a couple of months if you are heavy into music and videos.

 

According to your post, you want a computer that will do everything from graphic editing to playing games. That means power.

> You want an SSD, minimally 500gig;

> you want at least 16gig of DDR3 RAM.

> You will want at least two (2) USB3 ports, more is better. These manufacturers get stingy and want to load you up with DDR2 ports with only one DDR3 port supplied. DDR2 is almost obsolete, so loading up on them is flushed money.

> You will want a separate video card that is powerful, and has two (2) DVI ports so you can run dual monitors. If you want to game and run videos, integrated video on the motherboard is not going to cut it. If you are unsure about video cards, do some homework on them. Time wisely invested. You can find lots of good advice on this website.

> You will want a DVD drive.

>Some manufacturers are not providing them, but in the business world DVDs are still used for certain things. You need one.

I could go on but don't want to overwhelm you. Good hunting!


Help Requests: If there is no reply after 3 days I remove the thread from my answer list. For further help PM me.


#7 MadmanRB

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 02:03 PM

I dunno perhaps a actual desktop may be better for you.

All in ones may look cool but they offer little in upgrades and capacity.

You can however go small form factor without it being an issue.

 

I mean there is something like this:

 

http://www.dell.com/us/p/optiplex-7040-micro-desktop/pd?s=bsd&oc=ctoxao7040mffus&cid=298720&st=&gclid=CjwKEAjwse7JBRCJ576SqoD7lCkSJABF-bKuIJtpzMyguDCU4_oDO2hBwjkrXnrScENwHE8A7vHQgBoC8Szw_wcB&lid=5704669&VEN1=siWcmLYJ4%2C101950809789%2C901q5c14135%2Cc%2C%2CCTOXAO7040MFFUS&VEN2=%2C&dgc=ST&DGSeg=SO&acd=12309152537501410&VEN3=811303908648762614

 

 

Better just upgrading the main computer while keeping the monitor separate.

 

Even if the computer itself isnt the best it would still be better than a all in one 


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#8 Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

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Posted 10 June 2017 - 07:37 PM

Every so often the reputable forum "Tech Support Forum" publishes a list of "Recommended Builds" based on price.  There are Intel and AMD builds and "Other" more special purpose builds.

 

They have two recommended builds for Intel for $1,000 or less.

 

http://www.techsupportforum.com/forums/f255/tsf-hardware-teams-recommended-builds-2017-a-668661.html

 

This is not gospel, but it's a really good starting point because it forces you to have a substantive reason to NOT use the recommended component, such as motherboard, PSU, video card, etc... If you don't know enough to answer the question of "Why is this component better than the one that is recommended?", then you don't know enough to 2nd guess the opinions of these experts.

 

On a side note, Best Buy is the most crooked business on the planet.  Chance are high they have infected your mind with their manipulative and meaningless BS and you should be ready to purge that pseudo-knowledge as soon as someone discovers you have it and believe it.

 

If by "all in one" computers you mean the style that look like a big monitor with all the hardware contained inside, I get repair calls for those all the time and most of the time it's due to poor heat management.  They're iMac knock-offs and they're being sold to people who are easily manipulated into believing, well, anything that the $9.00 an hour crook at Best Buy tells them.

 

If by "all in one" you mean pre-built OEM systems, for general purpose computing (browsing the internet and email) they are the best solution for a lot of people.  For about $500 you can get a pretty good computer at Wal-Mart.  It might last two years. Upgrading them is horrific.  Their power supplies are crap.  The capacitors are cheap and will start leaking at some point meaning catastrophic failure of the motherboard and maybe other components along with it.  You still have to buy a monitor.  One guy just yesterday tells me he can't physically install a 2nd hard drive 1) because there's no installation "slot" for it and 2) because the BIOS won't allow a 2nd hard drive to be installed.  And it has a 300W Power Supply, which in chinese hardware terms means it probably outputs 220 Watts, which is pathetic and will kill hardware due to inadequate power and voltage.

 

My best advice to give you is to take the advice of the experts and let go of everything that you think you know 1) because you are probably wrong and 2) if you knew anything you'd be making your own decisions instead of asking for help.  Not you personally, but that's the common dynamic from newbs that think they can ask for help and continue to be wrong about what they think they know both at the same time.  You can't.  It's one or the other.  It will help things a lot of you simply recognize that you are surrounded by a lot of people all of whom know more about this stuff than you ever will, and unless you want to spend years attempting to achieve parity, it's best if you simple trust them to advocate what's best for you and not let yourself be an obstacle.

 

My personal opinion is build your own computer and make certain to have an SSD and a data drive both.  You can do this and stay under $1,000.  Never go cheap on the power supply.  You can re-use someone else's case and put that money into something else.  With a limited budget, cases are aesthetic wastes of money for the most part.  They sell TONS of computer cases on craigslist for $20.00.


Edited by Aaron_Warrior, 10 June 2017 - 07:41 PM.


#9 B412

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Posted 12 June 2017 - 09:20 AM

So I read the replies and some of them were confusing with some of the stuff lol but I'm starting to lean towards a traditional desktop now. Thing is, I see a lot of talk about upgrading the PC but I've never once upgraded one previously and didn't plan to either. I am open to suggestion though, I'm assuming by upgrading certain things will allow my computer to last longer instead of having to buy another in say 6 or so years?

 

Any suggestions on good ones around 1k or under? I would need a monitor keyboard mouse etc.

 

I appreciate the help so far, I just don't wanna get ripped off by best buy again.


Edited by B412, 12 June 2017 - 09:20 AM.


#10 hamluis

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Posted 12 June 2017 - 11:13 AM

Best Buy...is not the sole retail outlet for computers and computer parts...nor is it the best.  The only thing offered at BB (IMO) is ready/easy access for prospective consumers/customers who normally don't do a lot of research...and may not have a clue as to what or why they want a computer.

 

Newegg and Amazon are online outlets which have broader selections, good reputations, and a certain reliability which I would never anticipate seeing connected with Best Buy.

 

More In That Vein Of Thought

 

If you are serious about building a system.  It's not difficult and it will remove the "mystery" from what you think a computer is.  If interested in such, you really ought to open a new topic in the BC Building/Upgrading Forum.

 

If you are just going to throw money at any desktiop system prebuilt by an Original Equipment Manufacturer (Dell Lenovo, HP, etc.)...then you will be the perfect customer for anyone wanting to sell anything.  My suggestion would be...go to the Amazon website...take a look at the multitude of desktops they depict...read the user reviews.  As you do this, you will get an idea of what you want...and what you don't want...in a desktop system.  I then suggest focusing on 3 that you think you won't mind paying for...and which will meet your needs/desires...come back here, start a new topic, and ask for opinions on which is probably best for you.  Some of us will give you honest opinions of what YOU want, as opposed to what WE might want.

 

Just a suggestion.

 

Louis



#11 Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

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Posted 12 June 2017 - 12:42 PM

So I read the replies and some of them were confusing with some of the stuff lol but I'm starting to lean towards a traditional desktop now. Thing is, I see a lot of talk about upgrading the PC but I've never once upgraded one previously and didn't plan to either. I am open to suggestion though, I'm assuming by upgrading certain things will allow my computer to last longer instead of having to buy another in say 6 or so years?

 

Any suggestions on good ones around 1k or under? I would need a monitor keyboard mouse etc.

 

I appreciate the help so far, I just don't wanna get ripped off by best buy again.

 

I posted the link to TSF showing two computer builds for less than 1,000.  If you are going to build your own then you are going to have to be involved in the purchase of every single component.  If you want a single recommendation for a computer, pretty much anything at Walmart for less than $1000 is "good enough" as they are all pretty much the same.  They come with keyboard and mouse so your response above is confusing.

 

There's a difference between "building your own"and buying a prebuilt from Walmart.  Prebuilts come with keyboards and mice.  Building your own means you have to choose:

Motherboard

CPU and CPU Fan

Power supply

Video Card (of you don't want onboard video)

Memory

hard drive and/or SSD

mouse

keyboard

monitor

Case

Case Fan

optical drive (CD/DVD)

 

Best Buy is the crookedest business on the planet.  The Federal Government should have raided them years ago, kicked in their doors, seized all their business records, arrested all their employees and charged them all with Conspiracy to Commit Fraud.



#12 B412

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Posted 12 June 2017 - 12:53 PM

Thats my bad I made my post a little confusing. I don't know enough to build my own so I would just rather buy one that has a monitor keyboard and mouse together or unless theres a good recommendation on just the tower and I can buy the monitor keyboard and mouse separate but still maintain my budget.

 

I've been searching and I can't see to find everything I'm looking for or would need, seems like one has something and another has something else but lack another key feature.

 

Kind of like when I was looking at all in ones, I noticed the one from best buy I posted above but it didn't have a SSD. I won't be doing any heavy gaming, and most likely would only stream music from spotify so I won't be downloading any of that.

 

for photoshop, storing pictures/short clips, daily internet browsing and working from home (My wife was told she needs 8 gb of ram, 4gb will work but would be a little slow)

 

Also what is a good processor and graphics card to look for in a prebuilt PC? Thats another thing I'm not too sure about, whats quick for computers today.



#13 Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

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Posted 12 June 2017 - 01:08 PM

Building your own computer is not as difficult as it sounds.  And as long as you have a computer with access to the internet, you have access to a lot of people with a lot of experience building and they can help.  For the most part it's "plug and play" and the only areas where there are difficulties are when the Builder is using either very old, or oddball hardware (cheap), or bleeding edge tech that frequently won't play nice  with other hardware.  I'd say less than 5% of Builds are problematic.

 

One thing to keep in mind is that Custom Built computers are MUCH better than the pre-builts for a long list of reasons.  Too many to detail here.  You should read that TSF thread I linked, particularly the two Intel builds for less than 1,000.  Then follow the links of the components to NewEgg, which is the best computer hardware vendor on the planet.  Compared to Best Buy, who hires recently-release felons from prison.

 

Again all the computer at Walmart are pretty much the same.  It's counting the number of angels dancing on a pin.  Guess the best phrase is that there are "differentiations without a difference" meaning that, once you go down that conversational road, you are talking and minutiae as if they are significant.  Faster, slower, better, etc... fine shades of grey that no one will really notice 6 months later.  So you buy a pre-built OEM and 6 months later the hard drive dies because it's a cheap POS Hitachi.  Does it really matter that you bought the one that was 0.5% "faster" than another, or that you saved $35.17 by going with AMD and not Intel.

If it were me contemplating buying a pre-built computer at Wal-Mart, say for a family member or recommendation to an elderly neighbor, the 1st thing I'd look at is whether or not I could avoid Windows 10.



#14 GoofProg

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Posted 12 June 2017 - 04:15 PM

All in one computer.  I always see a laptop.  If there is a problem with your touch pad you may want to check static charges in the area or get a mouse.



#15 Planemaster2

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Posted 22 June 2017 - 01:56 AM

In buildingg a computer, I always recommend watching a video tutorial first to see whether you think you can do it or not. Something like this would have a similar set of core components

https://m.youtube.com/watch?list=PLA4BpBaN8wLCYYq24TiF9aWHwc0nvxpZD&v=cCBYvBfY9u4

Even if you don't want to build it yourself, you could take it to your local tech store and give them the parts you bought for them to build. That would still be a better option anyway as you can be assured of the quality. For example, my parents bought me a pre built computer nearly a year ago. In the time I've had it, I've had to replace my mouse, keyboard, headphones because they had broken. I also had to replace my Power Supply as the company who sold it, like most other companies, fitted a terrible power supply in which would probably fry my components sooner or later. I've probably spent £100 - £150 fixing the cheap c**p they bundled with my computer.

Otherwise, if you're completely against building computers, id recommend a laptop over an All in one. All in ones are just non portable versions of a laptop. No point in getting them really.




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