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DOWNGRADE WINDOWS 10


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#1 provobis

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 10:23 AM

That's right, I said downgrade (not upgrade), to 8.1 pro. More accurately I should call it a reinstall of 8.1 pro-64 bit over or in place of Windows 10 Home which is now installed and running on this HP 500-217c desktop. I bought this HP years ago with Windows 8 OS which of course was updated to 8.1. When the Windows 10 upgrade date rolled around I upgraded to Windows 10 (Home, since Win 8 was also the Home version). I have regretted that Win 10 upgrade ever since and if anyone wants to know why it's mainly because M$oft force updates for 10 whether the user wants them or not, good, bad, or indifferent. Whats more I believe the M$oft Home version(s) have distinct disadvantages compared to 64 bit (pro). So I want to install a 64 bit 8.1 pro version in place of the home version software. I do have OEM install cd's (actually DVD's) of both pre-activated 8.1 home and 64bit pro which I know I can use since I have activated both of those on 2 other computers. How to do it without losing any DATA, APPS, SETTINGS, MAIL APP, ETC on this HP is the question. Furthermore this HP has always been the main (home office) puter which networks to at least 2 other computers using a Linksys router whose install cd is outdated, and Linksys refuses to issue updated install software without payment, so if  Linksys settings can't be transferred (copied?) to a new 8.1 pro OS I want to use instead of the 10 home I'll have to buy another router which I can't afford at this time. So when I indicate saving ALL apps and settings in this process on 8.1 pro that's exactly what I mean (one way or another).

 

Obviously I can't roll back 10 to 8.1 at this time because I'm past the M$oft time limitation and besides I wouldn't want to roll back to the home version.

 

This HP has a AMD A8-6500 APU with Radeon HD graphics, 3.50 Ghz, 64 bit operating system with 64 bit processor, and installed memory of 32 GB.

 

I suspect I'll need guru help for this if it can be done, and if anyone's wondering why I need help anyway, though I've used computers for a good 30 years at my age I'm getting senile and probably have forgotten more than I've ever learned.


Edited by hamluis, 06 June 2017 - 02:08 PM.
Moved to Win 8 from Internal Hardware - Hamluis.


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#2 JohnC_21

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 10:49 AM

So I want to install a 64 bit 8.1 pro version in place of the home version software. I do have OEM install cd's (actually DVD's) of both pre-activated 8.1 home and 64bit pro which I know I can use since I have activated both of those on 2 other computers. How to do it without losing any DATA, APPS, SETTINGS, MAIL APP, ETC on this HP is the question. 

You cannot downgrade Windows 10 home to 8.1 Pro and keep your apps and programs intact. The downgrade requires a complete clean install using the 8.1 Pro install media requiring you to reinstall of all your programs. The best you could do is copy your personal user data and your mail data to a flash driver or USB external drive. Settings may be able to be copied but that would depend on the program and where the settings are stored. Browser settings for firefox and chrome can be saved easily. 



#3 MadmanRB

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 12:16 PM

Indeed so if you can please back up your apps and files.

Getting a windows 8/8.1 media isnt so hard as one can use a thumb drive and use the Microsoft media creation tool to do it.


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#4 Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 12:18 PM



Indeed so if you can please back up your apps and files.
Getting a windows 8/8.1 media isnt so hard as one can use a thumb drive and use the Microsoft media creation tool to do it.

 
I used a Windows 8.1 ISO and Rufus, but I had to modify a file after the USB was created in order to skip activation until after install.
 
Also you posted your thread in the "Internal Hardware" sub-forum.


If it were me, I'd partition the HD, install Win8.1 to that new partition and then hand-migrate the data to Win8.1 from partition-to-partition.  Then delete original partition.

Edited by hamluis, 06 June 2017 - 02:06 PM.
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#5 MadmanRB

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 12:20 PM

If it were me, I'd partition the HD, install Win8.1 to that new partition and then hand-migrate the data to Win8.1 from partition-to-partition.  Then delete original partition.

 

Indeed if external media is not at play this is a good plan


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#6 provobis

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Posted 08 June 2017 - 10:27 AM

 



Indeed so if you can please back up your apps and files.
Getting a windows 8/8.1 media isnt so hard as one can use a thumb drive and use the Microsoft media creation tool to do it.

 
I used a Windows 8.1 ISO and Rufus, but I had to modify a file after the USB was created in order to skip activation until after install.
 
Also you posted your thread in the "Internal Hardware" sub-forum.


If it were me, I'd partition the HD, install Win8.1 to that new partition and then hand-migrate the data to Win8.1 from partition-to-partition.  Then delete original partition.

 

Thanks for that Aaron_Warrior. Your "partition" suggestion seems to me more practical as well as being smoother if not shorter than anything else. Here are some of my thoughts about doing that. First, I have always used 2 partitions, one for system (Windows) and the other for Data. If it's of any interest I do that so for operating speed and to simplify and make more accurate any recovery, transfer, clone, copy data, or backup that might be needed. Currently I still have and use that partitioning, and on this HP the HDD is 1TB size. In other words I certainly have plenty of room to create another partition(s) (if I understand your suggestion) where I could install a "new" Win8.1, thereafter "hand migrating" other data "from partition-to-partition". Correct me if I'm wrong but by that do you mean I should use portable drives like flash, sandisk, etc. to migrate? Or do I simply boot on a new 8.1 and move data over? I'm not sure this HP is capable of doing that but if so I suppose I should go into the bios and change boot order, settings, etc. In fact in order to initially install the new 8.1 I would have to boot on my 8.1 install DVD instead of the usual boot order...correct? Any observations, suggestions? And those boot order changes would back and forth frequently until all transfer work is done where I would then delete the "original" Win 10 partition(s) and then make boot order normal?

 

Also with regard to my concern about Linksys router network settings and configurations that I've always used on this HP to network to at least 2 and sometimes 4 other puters, do you know if it's possible to "move" or copy that router installation settings to the new 8.1, or will I have to buy another router with a valid and current install software? As I may have mentioned Linksys refuses to update their original install CD software without cost.



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Posted 08 June 2017 - 01:55 PM

Thanks for that Aaron_Warrior. Your "partition" suggestion seems to me more practical as well as being smoother if not shorter than anything else. Here are some of my thoughts about doing that. First, I have always used 2 partitions, one for system (Windows) and the other for Data. If it's of any interest I do that so for operating speed and to simplify and make more accurate any recovery, transfer, clone, copy data, or backup that might be needed. Currently I still have and use that partitioning, and on this HP the HDD is 1TB size. In other words I certainly have plenty of room to create another partition(s) (if I understand your suggestion) where I could install a "new" Win8.1, thereafter "hand migrating" other data "from partition-to-partition". Correct me if I'm wrong but by that do you mean I should use portable drives like flash, sandisk, etc. to migrate? Or do I simply boot on a new 8.1 and move data over?  <--- This.  I'm not sure this HP is capable of doing that but if so I suppose I should go into the bios and change boot order, settings, etc. In fact in order to initially install the new 8.1 I would have to boot on my 8.1 install DVD instead of the usual boot order...correct?

 

Sorry just noticed this (Post is posted and now in "edit" and on reread I just see this.)
No, you either take your DVD and make an ISO out of it.  If it were me, I'd do this.  Not that big of a deal.  Once you have your unreliable, prone to catastrophic failure due to a single scratch optical media converted to electronic ISO format, as long as you have that ISO, you can always make a bootable USB to reinstall, or even burn a new DVD (for whatever reason).  Optical media is OUT.  ISO's are IN.

 

Any observations, suggestions?

 

Yes.  A ton.  Literally a TON of suggestions.  How much do you want to know and how much time and effort do you want to put into knowing it.  I could keep you busy learning for at least a month.

 

And those boot order changes would back and forth frequently until all transfer work is done where I would then delete the "original" Win 10 partition(s) and then make boot order normal?

 

All BIOS allows you to "set" boot order.  Some BIOS give you the option to also choose which drive to boot at that moment.  On my computer, hitting the "Esc" key at the start of boot gives me all the bootable devices and I can pick the one I want for just that one instace.

 

Also with regard to my concern about Linksys router network settings and configurations that I've always used on this HP to network to at least 2 and sometimes 4 other puters, do you know if it's possible to "move" or copy that router installation settings to the new 8.1, or will I have to buy another router with a valid and current install software? As I may have mentioned Linksys refuses to update their original install CD software without cost.

 

This confuses me.  Are you setting up port forwards?  MAC Address filtering (white/blacklisting, etc...)? Static Local IP Addresses?

 

 

First I challenge the idea that two partitions on the same HD have faster read/write times than having the data all on a single partition.  My tech experience is dated, I have to remember what I think I knew 5 years ago, but I suspect that this is more of an internet "myth" than a technically verifiable fact.

 

It might make things clearer for you "mentally" in terms of how your data is organized, which has value.  My point is to not elevate a minor quirk to the lofty height of "objectively provable as better".  We all have these quirks, but it's important to recognize them as such and not parlay them into more than that.  Sometimes you adapt your mind to fit your computer, and sometimes you adapt your computer to fit your mind.  That's a "good enough" reason, IMO.

 

First you make your new partition from Win10. Then make your Win8 USB drive using a good, clean Win8 ISO (meaning NOT modified and/or infected) and Rufus.  <-- Wrote this before I saw where you already had an official HP OEM Win8 Installation Disk.

 

PAY ATTENTION HERE.  VERY IMPORTANT.

 

If/when you install Win8, it is going to overwrite your boot partition making Win8 the default and you will not be able to access your Win10 O/S until you install a boot manager program like EasyBCD to your Win8 O/S.  Once the boot manager program is installed, it will find your Win10 O/S, add it to the list of options and after that you can choose between Win8 or Win10. I'll hold off of the step-by-step instructions for another post.  But I wanted to mention this now to prevent you from charging off and ending up with a brand-new Win8 O/S and no access to Win10.

 

To your primary question, you migrate your data while booted to the Win8 O/S.  It will call itself "Drive C:" and your Win10 will be called something like "Drive F:" and within Windows Explorer you can just hand "Cut" the contents of folders such as "My Documents" from "Drive F:" to "My Documents" on "Drive C:". Very simple, and straightforward.

I assume you are aware that almost none of the data from your installed programs will have any value, i.e. you'll have to reinstall all the software.  The saved game data might transfer over, but that will require some research on your part to determine where the data is in Win10 and where it needs to drop on Win8.  But documents, images, videos, etc... will transfer no problem.

 

I just did a Win8 install for the 1st time last week.  My current O/S is and has been Win7 for over 3 years and I like it fine but suspect that Win8 is safer from a security perspective and so that is why I want to move to Win8.  I've spent about 3 hours in the Win8 environment and I had to do a LOT of customization in order to learn to like it.  I used Windows Classic Shell to make it look more like Win7, and a 3rd party software named "Aero-something" to give the windows that "Aero" look that I like.  Tbh in some ways Win8 is annoying. I don't like the little menus that slide out from the sides when the mouse drifts over there.  I'll never use them and if I could turn them off I would.  But on the up-side it seems that Win8 is faster in some ways, but that could also be because it's brand-new and nothing has really been installed yet to clog things up. But I've seen Win10 and if it's a choice between Win10 and Win8, Win8 wins easily, so I both encourage and bless your goal of transitioning to Win8.  Plus the data mining and lack of privacy of Win10 makes it completely unacceptable to me, in fact I cringe whenever I read some idiot saying anything positive about Win10.  All it does is more firmly cement my belief that some people really hate any kind of freedom and individual rights and much prefer to be completely subordinated to an unseen conglomeration of corporate and government interests, and also that they are really the majority and I'm the weirdo in the minority.  You should be too, is my point.  Research "Software as a Service" for more FUD, and why it means that MS (et al...) can do anything they want with your computer now.


Edited by Aaron_Warrior, 08 June 2017 - 02:14 PM.


#8 provobis

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Posted 08 June 2017 - 03:57 PM

Thanks Aaron_Warrior, for the preliminary detail. And you have no idea how glad I am to see your comments with regard to Windows 10 and/or vs Windows 8. My feelings exactly. As for the Linksys networking issues I worry about, that you say "confuses you", I plead ignorant about why it confuses you or more accurately what you mean. Maybe to clarify........from the beginning years ago I have always used a Linksys WRT54G broadband router to "network" so any other computers or laptops I may have can share my DSL connection. Once that router is installed (on what I call the network home computer) my DSL connection can be shared (detected and connected) to the other computers in the network. If I create that new 8.1 on HP computer where that Linksys configuration is and was always installed, if I can't move that configuration to that 8.1 (i.e. a new computer drive) in order to share that DSL connection again I would have to reinstall the Linksys configuration(s) and I can't do a reinstall with an obsolete installer CD. At this time I'm not skillful enough to manually reconfigure the Linksys in that new computer so as to share my DSL with my other puters. It should be pretty obvious that I'm not technically proficient in the use of (though I've managed to use it anyway for years) broadband routers. In fact I'm not even sure what I would have to go out and buy (and how much to pay) to replace this Linksys if necessary.

 

I'd like to mention the partitioning reference that I made and you challenged for "read/write" speed. I have no doubt you're correct, so I should have mentioned speed in another context. An old MVP friend of mine who put me onto partitioning back in the day taught me separate system / data partitions in order to simplify backup recoveries and therefore make any recoveries faster. He actually did his partitioning so as to recover (actually reinstall) his system after any crashes or errors. When he did that he would only have to reinstall his apps after such a recovery. But I confess I'll never understand why he just didn't do the cloning I do so as to have a back up HDD in my desk drawer at all times. That always seemed much easier and less prone to mistakes.

But he also recommended that partitioning so as to make system or data searches easier (less confusing to the CPU as it were). 

 

As you say there's a "ton" and I'm not even closely competent to start. So it looks like you've made a friend for life. Making an ISO (and using) from of a DVD scares me. I've crashed enough times or made anything I'm working from or with un-bootable that it might be beyond my pay grade to play with ISO's and third party software like Rufus. So if I do that I'll need a lot of coaching.

 

Noticed your edit where you say Wrote this before I saw where you already had an official HP OEM Win8 Installation Disk. Actually I don't have a (so called) OEM Win8 installation disk. I do have a Win8 DVD with key, and a pre-activated Win8 DVD I got from another M$soft MVP friend. I've used both successfully to reinstall Win8 on several computers and they've  all activated and downloaded updates. The only thing I can't do with them anymore is to auto install Win10 since that date is long passed. But then who cares about 10 at this point? So is my DVD (optical media?)  something you can make an ISO or USB boot media from as you say? All I can tell you is that both my Win8 install DVD's have the same installation procedures, steps, and routines I've seen for any M$oft OS.

 

Something else is relevant. On the HP where Win10 is installed (1TB  HD) the partitioning mode is GPT. I've always had problems with GPT in so far as my cloning (backup) EaseUS software doesn't seem to like it and creates little partition errors or third party partitions that I can't seem to clean up without crashing. For that reason I would prefer MBR partition mode because I don't have that trouble on other computers running 8.1 or 10 in MBR mode. It seems current user wisdom likes GPT because it's not limited(?) to more than two partitions. Is it therefore still possible to create a new 8.1 with MBR partitions instead of GPT, or should I just stay with GPT. There also seems to be an error install issue when trying to install on this HP, having to do with GPT v MBR.

But then again I'm no guru and don't fully understand the partition technologies involved.

 

Well I've bent your ear long enough for this session, I'll wait for further as you advise.


Edited by hamluis, 15 June 2017 - 04:43 AM.


#9 smax013

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Posted 08 June 2017 - 05:07 PM

I would offer a variation on 's suggestion. My suggestion would be to use a separate hard drive (or SSD...whatever floats your boat) for the Windows 8 install. Using a separate partition will ultimate require you to mess with partitions AFTER you install Windows 8 and transfer everything over and then presumably want to delete the Windows 10 partition. Since you currently have the Windows 10 partition "first" and then seemingly have a data partition "second", that means your Windows 8 partition will be "third". So, you are looking at significant partition rearrangement/moving/etc if you want the Windows 8 partition to be first after presumably deleting the Windows 10 install and partition.

If you just use a separate disk, then you get around that. And since you said you use clones, then the disk with the Windows 10 install on it can become the clone disk for the Windows 8 setup after you complete the downgrade. If you go this route, then just remember to disconnect the Windows 10 drive while installing Windows 8 on the new drive. After you get Windows 8 installed, you can then reconnect the Windows 10 disk and then you can pick which drive you boot from using BIOS or the boot selection menu if you computer has one...both of mine do (I will note that if you go the partition route, then BIOS will not be involved in selecting which OS your boot from...it can only help choose which physical drive is used to boot, not which partition on a drive...you need a boot manager to pick which partition to use). This also has the advantage of staying away from a boot manager, which is a positive to me as they are a pain to deal with IMHO (especially if you want to remove an OS from the boot manager...at least it was in the past with the boot manager that Microsoft provided with Windows).

So, personally, that is the way I would go. The main downside is that you would need a second drive, which if you do not have means an additional expense. FWIW, this is how I have my older desktop set up for multiboot OSs. I use a separate drive to boot to Windows XP, Windows Vista, Windows 7, and Windows 8. I used to have all those drives installed in the case (which made it even heavier), but I just recently pulled the drives for XP, Vista, and 8 and installed a drive dock that I can use to install those drives if I need to boot to XP, Vista, or 8.

As to your router, I too am at least a little confused. There should effectively be nothing on your computer dealing with how the router is currently setup. Your router setup will stay exactly as it is with out doing anything in Windows 8. If you are talking about router configuration software, then many times it is not needed. Many routers (including a WRT54G to my knowledge) can be configured using a web interface. Many might ship with a setup "wizard" program that might make it easier, but personally I never used that software...I would always just use the web interface. The exception is my current router, which is an Apple router. They use dedicated software for configuration. So, I am not sure what "configuration" for the router you would need to move from the Windows 10 setup to the Windows 8 setup.

#10 provobis

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Posted 08 June 2017 - 06:12 PM

That looks intriguing smax013, but over my head and maybe even over this HP's head. For years it seems, I have not been able to use (connect) more than one disk at a time, never mind trying to boot on one plugged in disk in order to use 1 or 2 others plugged in elsewhere (on the MB). At this point that sounds like going down a rabbit hole to me....no offense.  Whenever I've tried to physically connect more than one SATA HDD (this MB has four SATA MB ports but only one HDD drive mount (so what the h???) for any reason temporary or permanent, somehow booting became impossible on any of them or I got boot error messages. I'm in no mood to lose all the data and stuff accumulated over the years and the only way I was able to recover from those instances was I had clones waiting in my desk drawer. So all I had to do was pull the (error) disk in that SATA port and plug the clone in that same SATA port.However I'm thinking that difficulty was mainly because I'm not proficient at rearranging the boot order(s). Don't know what I would have done if I didn't have that clone. 

 

 

I guess I should add whenever I tried using more than one SATA HD plugged in for any reason I just hung one outside the tower case temporarily because there is no provision to mount more than one HDD in this HP model 500217c. 


Edited by hamluis, 15 June 2017 - 04:44 AM.


#11 smax013

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Posted 08 June 2017 - 07:03 PM

No offense taken. Just offering another approach. The partition approach would work, but just keep in mind that you will have some partition work to do with the drive if you want to delete the Windows 10 partition AND then combine the space from the Windows 10 partition with either your data partition or the Windows 8 partition. It is not necessarily hard to do, just some extra steps (including backing up your drive BEFORE messing with any partitions).

And FWIW, you do not need to hook up both drives internally. You could pull the Window 10 drive and install the new drive. Then install Windows 8 on the new drive. And then install the Windows 10 drive (with the data partition) in a drive enclosure and hook it up by USB. Thus, when you boot the Windows 8, the Windows 10 drive (and data partition) will just show up as an external USB drive and you can then copy over whatever you need from the Windows 10 partition to the Windows 8 drive and copy your data from the data partition on the Windows 10 drive to a new partition on the new drive (or just keep the Windows 8 drive as one partition and copy your data to the appropriate place on the Windows 8 drive). Now, the downside of going this extra step (i.e. hooking it up as an external drive) is that you will have to buy an enclosure for the old drive if you do not already have one. So, it would add even more expense relative to the partition method. Also, if you computer only supports USB 2.0 ports, then any transfer of files from the Windows 10 drive attached externally to the Windows 8 drive might take a while. That also solves the issue of only one place to mount an internal drive in your HP's case.

Again, just offering up another option. As always, which option you want to go it 100% up to you. I mainly offered it because of my own biases of hating to deal with boot managers, especially Microsoft's. It I want more than one OS install on my computer, I tend to use separate drives or install the second OS in a virtual machine (which would not help you at all).

#12 Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 12:13 AM

Breaking this into chunks.  This is only about the Linksys sub-thread.

 

As for the Linksys networking issues I worry about, that you say "confuses you", I plead ignorant about why it confuses you or more accurately what you mean. Maybe to clarify........from the beginning years ago I have always used a Linksys WRT54G broadband router to "network" so any other computers or laptops I may have can share my DSL connection. Once that router is installed (on what I call the network home computer) my DSL connection can be shared (detected and connected) to the other computers in the network. If I create that new 8.1 on HP computer where that Linksys configuration is and was always installed, if I can't move that configuration to that 8.1 (i.e. a new computer drive) in order to share that DSL connection again I would have to reinstall the Linksys configuration(s) and I can't do a reinstall with an obsolete installer CD. At this time I'm not skillful enough to manually reconfigure the Linksys in that new computer so as to share my DSL with my other puters. It should be pretty obvious that I'm not technically proficient in the use of (though I've managed to use it anyway for years) broadband routers. In fact I'm not even sure what I would have to go out and buy (and how much to pay) to replace this Linksys if necessary.

 

I've used nothing but that Linksys WRT54G for years now, so you've hit jackpot.  There's no "install" of the router. Pure plug & play.  You can diagram out for me how your network is configured, but more than likely it goes like::

Modem > WRT54G > Your Computer, plus any others, all plugged into their own LAN connection.

Plus Wireless Access to the WRT54G.

 

There's no "install".  You plug it in and it goes.  Now, if you want to configure something, you manually type-in the local IP Address of the WRT54G ("192.168.0.1", probably), it says "User" (which you don't need) and "Password" (whatever it is) and that allows you access to the configuration settings of the Wireless router via your Browser (Chrome, IE, FF, it doesn't matter.  All done by local IP address).  As I think of this, I realize you probably installed the CD from Linksys thinking it was necessary.

 

Or even useful.  Lol.

 

Told you I had stuff to keep you learning.  You can throw that CD away.

 

In short, no need to worry about saving software settings or anything.  Just write down the IP Address for the WRT54G on a piece of paper, your User name (not needed) and the PW (needed).  If catastrophic failure there is a reset button on the back to sent it back to factory default settings, factory IP Address, and factory password.

Almost idiot-proof.  But it will be easier if you don't have to do all that.


Edited by Aaron_Warrior, 09 June 2017 - 12:33 AM.


#13 Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 12:23 AM

I would offer a variation on 's suggestion. My suggestion would be to use a separate hard drive (or SSD...whatever floats your boat) for the Windows 8 install. Using a separate partition will ultimate require you to mess with partitions AFTER you install Windows 8 and transfer everything over and then presumably want to delete the Windows 10 partition. Since you currently have the Windows 10 partition "first" and then seemingly have a data partition "second", that means your Windows 8 partition will be "third". So, you are looking at significant partition rearrangement/moving/etc if you want the Windows 8 partition to be first after presumably deleting the Windows 10 install and partition.

 

He's right.  This is the down side to my method.  I had to go through this myself.  The problem is that the Win10 partition is on the 1st partition and although EasyBCD will let you boot to a 2nd or 3rd partition, Win8 might not let you delete that 1st partition, because that's where the MBR is kept.  Or, you could delete the 1st partition, lose the MBR and not be able to access Win8 on the 2nd or 3rd partition.

 

In my situation, I had a client's computer with old WinXP on partition 1, and new Win7 on partition 2, and while the computer booted straight to Win7, I could NOT get rid of old WinXP's partition.  So I deleted all the data, shrunk it to as small as an "unmovable file" would let me, made the partition "hidden" and didn't tell the client.  He lost some HD space.  But he didn't lose any data.

 

There's probably a solution, as I'm sure this has happened to someone smarter than me and they figured it out.  But, on balance I personally would rather not buy a 2nd HD, unless it was a 250 Gbyte Samsung EVO

 

https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16820147372 and I had $107 to spend.  Then I would.  Install Win8 to that, convert the other HD to "data only" and then it would actually deliver the performance boost he thinks he's getting now, and then some.  Two separate HD's (performance boost) + SSD as system drive PERFORMANCE BOOST.

Makes me want to go buy that SSD right now.  Soooo tempting.



#14 Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 12:30 AM

I guess I should add whenever I tried using more than one SATA HD plugged in for any reason I just hung one outside the tower case temporarily because there is no provision to mount more than one HDD in this HP model 500217c. 

 

https://h30434.www3.hp.com/t5/Notebook-Hardware-and-Upgrade-Questions/add-2nd-hard-drive-to-HP-Pavilion-500-210qe/td-p/3246869

 

A thread on the official HP support forum says this model "cannot" have more than one HD.  I bet I could make one fit.  I'd need to have it in front of me though.  I've seen them hung or installed in lots of crazy ways.  At minimum OP, I bet you could zip-tie a new 2.5" SSD to the old 3.5" HD.


Again, just offering up another option. As always, which option you want to go it 100% up to you. I mainly offered it because of my own biases of hating to deal with boot managers, especially Microsoft's. It I want more than one OS install on my computer, I tend to use separate drives or install the second OS in a virtual machine (which would not help you at all).

 

I hate them too, and only use them when I can't find another way. GRUB is even worse.


Edited by Aaron_Warrior, 09 June 2017 - 12:31 AM.


#15 smax013

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 01:15 AM

I've used nothing but that Linksys WRT54G for years now, so you've hit jackpot.  There's no "install" of the router. Pure plug & play.


I shall quibble a little bit (something I excel at, BTW) with the "pure plug and play" bit. Yes, the vast majority of routers you can just plug it in and "play" (i.e. use it without any configuration). I would offer that you typically at least want to go to the configuration to typically do two things: 1) change the router password for security purposes...the most common way a router is hacked is that the user did not change the default password; and 2) setup or change the WiFi password...not all routers will have WiFi setup by default or if they do, you likely will want to change the WiFi password. There are other configuration things that be advisable or that one might want to do, but those two are typically a virtual must. So, I would not just "plug and play" a router even if it can be.




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