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BootMGR is missing


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#1 SkipperGas

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 08:55 AM

Question 

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BOOTMGR is missing
SkipperGaston asked on May 29, 2017rsp-expand-down.png?ver=17.5.30.1
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I have tried everything that I have found to get beyond the "BOOTMGR is missing" message, but have not yet been able to boot into Window 7.  Perhaps I am trying to do something that can't be done...

 

I started with a Windows 7 system that was getting hard drive errors.  When I attempted to backup a system image with Macrium Reflect, it would not complete because of hard drive errors.  The Win 7 system had 3 partitions on the hard drive:  OS, recovery, and a small FAT partition.  I finally gave up on getting everything backed up, and only selected the OS and FAT partitions, and got a successful system image created.  I then went on to restore the system image to a good hard drive, and started trying to get it to boot.  Note:  the bad hard drive was still booting okay after a few runs with chkdsk  /r.

 

One thing I noticed is that I think the active partition on the bad hard drive was the recovery partition that did not get successfully backed up.  I don't know if that is significant.

 

I have tried  Bootrec (/fixmbr, /fixboot, /rebuildbcd).  I have also tried many other things I have found at different websites, such as the following link:

 

https://support.microsoft.com/en-us/help/2622803/bootmgr-is-missing-press-ctrl-alt-del-to-restart-error-when-you-start-windows

 

but nothing has worked.

 

For a while, I was trying with the 2 partitions, then later I deleted the small FAT partition, and tried to work with only the OS partition.  

 

I have tried several methods of rebuilding the BCD,  refreshing it, etc., 

 

I would like to know if what I am trying to do is even possible, where I have gone from 3 partitions to 2, then to 1?  

 

Thank you

 

 



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#2 hamluis

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 09:55 AM

If the origin of your problems...is a failing hard drive...it's not likely (IMO) that any software tool will benefit you.  Backing up or cloning a hard drive after it has exhibited problems...IME, that yields absolute garbage for files which I might wish to be readable/useful.

 

Topic moved from Win 7 to Backup/Imaging, where more knowledgeable personnel may try to assist you.

 

Louis


Edited by hamluis, 02 June 2017 - 09:56 AM.


#3 JohnC_21

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 10:14 AM

What is the make and model of the computer or was it a custom build. Are you trying recover any data? The small FAT partition may be the EFI system partition if your computer is UEFI. That partition is the one that is supposed to be marked active. Do you have  legible key on a COA sticker?



#4 SkipperGas

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 10:41 AM

What is the make and model of the computer or was it a custom build. Are you trying recover any data? The small FAT partition may be the EFI system partition if your computer is UEFI. That partition is the one that is supposed to be marked active. Do you have  legible key on a COA sticker?

The bad hard drive computer specs are:  Dell Inspiron 620, Core i5-2320, Win 7 HP (sp1), 8.00GB RAM, 64 bit.  The Win 7 system has been activated.

 

It was having problem booting, but I was eventually able to get it to boot with multiple runs of chkdsk /r, and found that the hard drive errors were "Uncorrectable Sector Count – 100, 99, 0, 26"

 

At first, Macrium Reflect would not create a system image, until after chkdsk had run several times, and it would only create a system image with 2 partitions.  It would not let me include the restore partition.

 

At this time, the original "bad" hard drive is still running, and booting into Win 7 okay.  I just don't know how long it will last.  

 

I'm not trying to recover any data



#5 JohnC_21

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 10:56 AM

Firstly backup your Activation Files with Advanced Tokens Manager. Unzip the file to your desktop. Start the program and click on Activation Backup. If you have Office also click the Office button. After completion of the backup the button will change to Activation Restore. Make a note of the key found by the program. Copy the unzipped folder back to a flash drive. 

 

If you do not have a Windows 7 install disk then download your version using this tool. Select COEM of Windows 7 Pro or Home depending on your version. Install Windows 7 to a good drive at a time of your choosing using the key found by ATM. After install copy the folder back to the desktop and click Activation Restore. You may need to download and install additional drivers as the iso is not OEM specific. 

 

After backing your activation files and copying them to a flash drive tapping F12 at boot will let you perform the Dell Diagnostics. 



#6 RolandJS

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Posted 03 June 2017 - 04:10 PM

Do you have current restorable backups of this problematic hard-drive's various partitions on reliable external media?

If not, you will have an increasing uphill battle making backups at this point.  Data Recovery folks, from beginners to experts, always assume the worst is imminently going to happen to a hard-drive at the first sign of physical or logical HD failure until proven otherwise.  If you have not been making routine backups, you will have to today, if not yesterday, continue to make good faith efforts to make a one-pass full image of each partition that you can make onto reliable external media, be it DVDs (not recommended for this situation), usb flash or pen drives, or usb platter-driven hard-drives. 


Edited by RolandJS, 03 June 2017 - 04:11 PM.

"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#7 SkipperGas

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Posted 03 June 2017 - 05:29 PM

Do you have current restorable backups of this problematic hard-drive's various partitions on reliable external media?

If not, you will have an increasing uphill battle making backups at this point.  Data Recovery folks, from beginners to experts, always assume the worst is imminently going to happen to a hard-drive at the first sign of physical or logical HD failure until proven otherwise.  If you have not been making routine backups, you will have to today, if not yesterday, continue to make good faith efforts to make a one-pass full image of each partition that you can make onto reliable external media, be it DVDs (not recommended for this situation), usb flash or pen drives, or usb platter-driven hard-drives. 

I was not able to make a system image of all partitions with Macrium Reflect because of disk errors, even after multiple runs with chkdsk /r; however, I was able to make a system image of 2 out of 3 partitions, with the "recover" partition being the one that I could not get into the system image.  I agree with you about the importance of regular hard drive backups.  The hard drive in question belongs to a customer who is learning the lesson the hard way.



#8 RolandJS

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Posted 03 June 2017 - 05:32 PM

"...The hard drive in question belongs to a customer who is learning the lesson the hard way..."

I understand perfectly!  I've been there, not done that years ago -- lost some stuff.


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

http://collegecafe.fr.yuku.com/forums/45/Computer-Technologies/

Backup, backup, backup! -- Lady Fitzgerald (w7forums)

Clone or Image often! Backup... -- RockE (WSL)


#9 SkipperGas

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 08:30 PM

Firstly backup your Activation Files with Advanced Tokens Manager. Unzip the file to your desktop. Start the program and click on Activation Backup. If you have Office also click the Office button. After completion of the backup the button will change to Activation Restore. Make a note of the key found by the program. Copy the unzipped folder back to a flash drive. 

 

If you do not have a Windows 7 install disk then download your version using this tool. Select COEM of Windows 7 Pro or Home depending on your version. Install Windows 7 to a good drive at a time of your choosing using the key found by ATM. After install copy the folder back to the desktop and click Activation Restore. You may need to download and install additional drivers as the iso is not OEM specific. 

 

After backing your activation files and copying them to a flash drive tapping F12 at boot will let you perform the Dell Diagnostics. 

As it turns out, part of my problem may have been that I was trying to test the restored hard drive on a different computer than it came from.  I started over, and installed Windows 7 onto the good hard drive, then used Macrium Reflect to delete the newly created OS partition - leaving the "active" system reserved behind intact - and restored the backed up OS from the bad hard drive onto the good hard drive. When I tested this on the original computer home of the bad hard drive, it worked perfectly! Sometimes I am my own worst enemy! Thank you for your help, comments, and suggestions!



#10 SkipperGas

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Posted 06 June 2017 - 07:29 AM

I consider this topic to be solved, and am grateful for the help provided by this forum.  It is a true blessing to have a place to go for help when you have reached the end of your own rope!  :guitar:






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