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About Assembly Language


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#1 Mikky004

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 04:37 AM

Hi friends,
I have a question and want detailed answer please.
Which level language is Assembly Language and what’s its importance?

Edited by Al1000, 02 June 2017 - 06:12 AM.
moved from Internal Hardware


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#2 Angoid

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 09:06 AM

Hi Mikky,

 

If you want detailed answers, you need to ask questions which can have detailed answers.  Assembly language is called a "low level" programming language, because it is close to the processor itself.

 

Half a mo .... Try this link - it gives you tips on how to search and may point you to useful articles :)


Edited by Angoid, 02 June 2017 - 09:07 AM.

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#3 Platypus

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 09:16 AM

How detailed do your homework answers need to be?
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#4 GoofProg

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Posted 04 June 2017 - 01:53 PM

Assembly language is the lowest of the low in computer programming.  Everything gets boiled down to machine language which is assembly language.  You want to write the smallest type of executable?  Write it in assembly language.  If you need to interface into hardware.  Assembly language may be the way to go.



#5 Platypus

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Posted 04 June 2017 - 11:12 PM

Assembly language is the lowest of the low in computer programming.  Everything gets boiled down to machine language which is assembly language.


Assembly language isn't machine language. Machine language is binary code that is executed directly by the CPU. Assembly language is a mnemonic code readable by humans.

For example, assembly language uses the MOV instruction to load a register, the equivalent machine language instruction produced to be executed by the CPU (the opcode) is 89h or 10001001 binary.
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#6 Angoid

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 07:40 AM

Correct, but assembly language usually translates as one-to-one.  That is, one instruction of assembly language means one machine code instruction (which may be one or more bytes in length).

 

Thus MOV EAX, 0x2A will move the hexadecimal value 2A (42 in decimal) into the Extended AX register (32-bits) and is one instruction.

 

Googling further turns up this link here:

http://www.cs.virginia.edu/~evans/cs216/guides/x86.html

 

So while is is completely correct to say that assembly language is not machine code (or machine language), the result of running assembly language through your assembler is a machine code program that can be understood natively by the processor (and thus is unlikely to be portable to another platform).

 

Compare to other languages such as Java, where the compiler produces "bytecode" that is interpreted and run by the JVM.

Or languages such as the C family, where one language instruction can translate to many machine code instructions (although one-to-one is possible for some lines of code).


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#7 GoofProg

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Posted 12 June 2017 - 02:33 PM

Yes assembly language is machine code dude.  IT IS.  Try to hand translate it and you will know it is just uses associations and variables for replacing machine statements.


Edited by GoofProg, 12 June 2017 - 02:34 PM.


#8 Platypus

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Posted 13 June 2017 - 08:28 AM

Yes assembly language is machine code dude.  IT IS.

Of course it isn't. Why would you try to insist it is?

it is just uses associations and variables for replacing machine statements.


Which is the fundamental principle all higher level languages use to develop machine code. If assembly language was machine code there would be no need for the assembler to do anything. The fact that it is only one level up from executable code and the symbolic code usually has a one-to-one relationship with the opcodes doesn't mean they are the same thing.

If Mikky004's inquiry, Which level language is Assembly Language, is genuine and they claimed assembly language is machine code in their exam, would it be marked correct?
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#9 GoofProg

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 11:53 AM

Yes it is.  I'm a college grad and it is. I would say instead of playing happy slappy..just look into it for yourself.
There is MASM, Visual Studio can do inline assembly.  AT&T syntax assembly with gcc.  There is yasm...


Edited by GoofProg, 15 June 2017 - 12:03 PM.


#10 Platypus

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 02:47 AM

Suit yourself... :)
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#11 GoofProg

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Posted 29 June 2017 - 02:34 PM

Suit yourself... :)

quite.

 

Yeah a regular person does not need to know assembly language.  Just let it run around. (I hate legal ninjas...I'm using inference study techniques so excuse me)


Edited by GoofProg, 29 June 2017 - 02:36 PM.


#12 Pimptech

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Posted 17 July 2017 - 11:40 PM

Hi friends,
I have a question and want detailed answer please.
Which level language is Assembly Language and what’s its importance?

 

Low-Level. 
CPU only know machine code that can be binary or hexadecimal representation.

Each code corresponds to an instruction, these codes are known as Operation Code (opcode) and as the Platypus said, MOV instruction is represented as  code "89", but this in the IA-32 architecture. So to make the reading of the instructions that the CPU will execute easy the Assembly Language came handy translating the instructions to mnemonics representation more human readable.

 

Assembly Language isn't universal so as a normal program depends on compiler, the Assembly depends on assembler (compile assembly). Each architecture has differences between each other. There are a lot of architectures, so the assembler changes to each other, but it does the same thing. Some architectures can do more others minus and so on.






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