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External speakers not working. Internal ones ok


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#1 Juliasdream

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 01:12 AM

I have a Medion E7214 laptop upgraded from Windows 7 to Windows 10.

Everything seems ok but the active speakers I purchased recently will not connect

Internal speakers work fine

I right click on speaker, then playback devices

When I click "test" in properties it makes a sound in both speakers one after the others but when I try to watch streams on BBC Iplayer there is no sound through the external speakers. Only the internal ones

Thanks in advance for any help on this

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#2 britechguy

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 09:34 AM

Have you looked in Control Panel to see if you have any sort of advanced audio controls?   For example, on my HP laptop there is DTS Audio Control.  There are others.

 

These can very often be used to direct sound to specific sets of speakers or all speakers and if you've got some kind of manufacturer advanced audio control it will give you much more information about what's going on than the basic Windows sound settings.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.  Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.

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#3 Juliasdream

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 11:34 AM

.ThNks. I couldn't find dts. My laptop is quite old. I bought it when Windows 7 was very new

Have you looked in Control Panel to see if you have any sort of advanced audio controls?   For example, on my HP laptop there is DTS Audio Control.  There are others.
 
These can very often be used to direct sound to specific sets of speakers or all speakers and if you've got some kind of manufacturer advanced audio control it will give you much more information about what's going on than the basic Windows sound settings.



#4 britechguy

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 11:43 AM

It need not be DTS.  There are all kinds of Audio Controllers and if you look through each and every item on your control panel when it's in "small icons" view it should be obvious which one it is if one is present.  It's usually related to who made your sound card, but sometimes not.

 

In any case, given what you've mentioned it might be a really good time to start considering new hardware.  You're living on borrowed time with something that dates from the introduction of Windows 7 and pretty much even the lowest end laptop or desktop is light years ahead of it in performance.  It's much easier to transition when you can pace yourself and your data transfer than to have your existing machine "collapse" and be forced to do everything in a rush.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.  Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.

       ~ Mark Twain

 

 

 

              

 


#5 Juliasdream

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 04:35 PM

Seems I found the problem by trial and error. It was the way I was plugging in the speaker jack. When I pushed it in quickly and more forcibly the control panel popped up showing the Line in option

Concerning your suggestion I'm a bit of a die hard when it comes to technology

My laptop has a perfectly good i3 processor. with 4gb RAM, It holds 2 hard drives so now I have one 500gb and a boot 240gb SSD. I even bought a new matt screen to replace the damaged one

I prefer to improve and upgrade what I have instead of giving up on a perfectly good computer than to ditch it and buy another

But thank you for your help

 

It need not be DTS.  There are all kinds of Audio Controllers and if you look through each and every item on your control panel when it's in "small icons" view it should be obvious which one it is if one is present.  It's usually related to who made your sound card, but sometimes not.

 

In any case, given what you've mentioned it might be a really good time to start considering new hardware.  You're living on borrowed time with something that dates from the introduction of Windows 7 and pretty much even the lowest end laptop or desktop is light years ahead of it in performance.  It's much easier to transition when you can pace yourself and your data transfer than to have your existing machine "collapse" and be forced to do everything in a rush.


Edited by Juliasdream, 02 June 2017 - 04:36 PM.


#6 britechguy

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 05:26 PM

Juliasdream,

 

          I'm glad you've solved your problem.

 

          By the way, what I was offering was only a suggestion.  I am very much like you.  That being said, what you call "improve and upgrade" I think of as "replacing, piece by piece."   There is no right or wrong answer, but my take is generally one that is financial as well as conforming to my principles.  I just can't justify the expense for improvements after a certain period of time when a fully new computer will actually cost less than the bits I'd want to replace.  And given the rate at which processing power improves what was a high end machine a couple of years ago is bested by bargain basement units for sale now.  Whatever works for you is definitely what you should do.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.  Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.

       ~ Mark Twain

 

 

 

              

 





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