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How to combine all of these partitions?


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#1 mystic12

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 05:05 AM

Hello guys, this Asus A43S laptop is showing OS [C], local disks E, F and G. It is originally a win7 laptop but was upgraded to win10 and I just did a reset. I am not seeing any partition which is showing the recovery partition. How can I best combine them all into just one so Local disk C BUT without erasing the Recovery partition please?



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#2 Hareen

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 05:50 AM

Recovery partition will be generally in smaller size( from what I've seen.).

 

What are the sizes of new partitions though?

Just try going through their contents.

 

You can use EaseUS Free edition to join all other partitions without much hassle.



#3 mystic12

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 06:03 AM

F and G is empty. D is 128mb and E is 110mb. I am not seeing any entries with the word "recovery" in either of those 2 folders?



#4 mystic12

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 11:19 AM

I am seeing a Windows.old folder on the C partition, that should be the recovery right?



#5 britechguy

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 11:24 AM

No, Windows.old is what Windows 10 will use to roll back to the previous build prior to a major update for the 14-day period (I think, it might be 10) where the OS allows that.  It is not a recovery partition.

 

Also, if you're talking about a Windows 10 machine that is the result of an upgrade from Windows 7, 8/8.1, would you really want the manufacturer recovery partition anyway?  Even if it's a machine that had Windows 10 "out of the box," after you've spent tons of time customizing it and, I presume, taking system image backups as needed would you ever really want the manufacturer recovery partition?

 

After all, once a machine has been licensed for Windows 10 that digital entitlement is held on Microsoft's servers and you can completely wipe the machine and reinstall Windows 10 from scratch, in its latest Version, if you so desired.

 

The whole concept of a recovery partition is, by and large, a pre-Windows 10 concept unless you would really prefer to be able to restore the machine to the original "out of the box" state.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

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#6 mystic12

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 11:28 AM

Oh I see, so I can combine all partitions into one [C] and if needed to do a win10 reset again, the option will still be there?



#7 britechguy

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 11:46 AM

Your mixing terminology apples and oranges as far as Windows 10 goes.

 

Reset is part of Windows 10 itself and can be found under Settings, Update & Security, Recovery and Windows 10 needs to be running at least well enough to get you there to kick off a Reset, whether you elect to keep your files (user data, virtually all programs and apps installed by the user get wiped) or do a full wipe reset.

 

A straight Windows 10 install, using bootable media, can be done in perpetuity (or as long as Windows 10 and its progeny last) on any machine that has ever been legally licensed with Windows 10, even if you've installed a completely different OS on it or wiped the entire hard drive clean and are starting from scratch with a machine that does not have any OS on it after the wipe.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

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#8 mystic12

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 12:13 PM

Got it now, very well explained, thank you!. So next step is I would like to have just one partition so only a C drive showing but first time using Easeus and as the attached images shows, it is not giving me th option to check the G, D, E and F boxes to combine them all? I can only check both C and G boxes.

 

Attached File  partition 3.jpg.png   716.44KB   0 downloads


Edited by mystic12, 01 June 2017 - 12:13 PM.


#9 JohnC_21

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 12:24 PM

Is this Minitools Partition Wizard. What I would do if the program does not allow a merge is to copy the data form the other partitions to D:. I would then delete the other partitions, move D: to the end of the hard drive and expand C: 

 

Edit: I would be more comfortable doing something like this outside of windows using a bootable partition manager like Gparted or the bootable Minitools version 9.1.


Edited by JohnC_21, 01 June 2017 - 12:25 PM.


#10 mystic12

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 12:27 PM

I have a Parted magic bootable disc. If I remember correctly that has a Gparted function, can I use that?



#11 britechguy

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 12:33 PM

Just my 2 cents, but I would not even combine all of these into a huge, singular C:

 

There are distinct advantages to allowing the OS to have a "drive" (logical, in this case and many cases) all its own with user data all being stored on a separate logical drive.  I've done that on several previous Windows machines I've owned but was just too lazy to bother when I got this one.  It requires that you "re-point" all of the individual user "home folders" away from C: and on to that alternate logical drive.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#12 mystic12

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 12:37 PM

Well, there is no reason I am seeing to have separate drives, I had chosen the option to wipe the drive clean while resetting so I don;t need any info from those other drives and never will.



#13 britechguy

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 12:43 PM

mystic12,

 

           I'm not disagreeing that there is good reason to integrate all of those remaining drives into one logical drive.  I'm not even questioning that it would be OK to merge everything into C:.

 

           What I am suggesting is that you might want to keep C: as it's own separate logical drive for the use of the Windows OS only while creating a single drive with another letter from the remaining four, then using that new logical drive as your user data storage area.

 

            I am also not saying that my proposal is "the right one."  It's just something you might want to consider, and do a little reading up on, before you make your own final decision about what you actually wish to do.  The better informed you are the more comfortable you'll feel about whatever direction you decide to go.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#14 JohnC_21

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 12:51 PM

I have a Parted magic bootable disc. If I remember correctly that has a Gparted function, can I use that?

Yes, but as I posted I would keep a Data partition of D: and make it whatever size is your preference. Then expand C: into the unallocated space from the deletion of E:,F:, and G:



#15 mystic12

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Posted 01 June 2017 - 12:57 PM

I appreciate that advice guys and I am aware of it and the advantages of having the OS on one drive and data on the other, I just never preferred that option.


Edited by mystic12, 01 June 2017 - 12:58 PM.





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