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More cooling for hdd needed


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#1 nielsvanvelzen

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 02:37 AM

Since I want quite a large number of disks internally, I use one disk bay in a 5.25" slot to store a WD Red 8 TB. Most of my hard disks stay at 30 - 35 celcius, but this one can go 40 celcius under normal use and 45 celcius when reading/writing a lot of data. I think that's too warm and I'd like to cool a bit more, but how?

 

I'm wondering: is it possible to mount a 120mm fan directly in the 5.25" slot above the disk, so it blows air directly on the disk?

If so: how?

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Edited by nielsvanvelzen, 31 May 2017 - 02:39 AM.


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#2 jamescartonn

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 03:26 AM

Try to Hard Drive Cooler I think is better for you here is sample link for you find you get what you want. ####

Edited by Al1000, 28 March 2018 - 08:06 AM.
remove spam link


#3 nielsvanvelzen

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 03:37 AM

Try to Hard Drive Cooler I think is better for you here is sample link for you find you get what you want. ####

 
Sounds like a good idea, but in that case I'd like to be able to replace the fan with an ultra-silent noctua one. Any suggestions?
 
Another idea (which I came across) is installing a drive bay which fills 3 x 5.25" slots and can fit 4 hard drives. They come with the option to install a fan in the front (including dust filter). However, I sometimes replace this 8 TB hard drive for a different drive when I backup data to it (and then store it in a safe place). A drive bay (and the option to add even more drives to it) is an option that I like, however, I need a solution for my backup disks then... They are quite some (smaller, older ones), so buying 10+ external enclosures is not an option for me...
 
Edit: I found an interesting product which also allows some extra hot-swappable hard drives to be placed: https://www.alternate.nl/Chenbro/4-bay-3-5-Hot-swap-w-12Gbps-SATA-SAS-backplane-Inbouwframe/html/product/1233401?lk=9308
 
I'd like to hear if there are other brands that make these bays and what is good to buy. I am looking for reliability, quality and many years of serving me, not a cheap solution that is okayish.

Edited by Al1000, 28 March 2018 - 08:05 AM.
edit spam link from quoted post


#4 mjd420nova

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 03:06 PM

I use an extra fan to boost the internal cooling.  Closing off open areas with 3 X 5 cards cut to conform to increase air flow through the bay.  I also close off the power supply vents into the case so the PS fan cools just the PS and the internal case fan cools the rest.  Using thin foam sheets for a filter, exhaust should be from the top and  intake from the bottom.



#5 smax013

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Posted 03 June 2017 - 07:31 PM

You could use a SATA to eSATA bracket to then allow you to hook the drive up externally. You then put the drive either in an external eSATA enclosure that has its own fans or use an external drive dock that might be cool enough with the drive "out in the open" or even blow air from a desk fan on it.

Example SATA to eSATA bracket (there are also version with two eSATA ports):

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000GX4C7I/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Example of drive dock with eSATA, USB 3.0, and Firewire (cheaper options are out there, but this is a brand I use and trust...you can also get models that can handle two drives):

https://eshop.macsales.com/item/NewerTech/VU3ESFW8/

I won't offer an example of an external enclosure with a fan as they are pretty self explanatory.

I regularly use an eSATA bracket with my old Windows desktop and have one on order (arriving tomorrow) for my new build that I just finally got around to actually building (I could not find my spare brackets). It also fits you need to wanting to disconnect the drive at times.

Beyond that, an operating temperature of 45 deg C is well within operating specs for a WD Red. Here is the spec sheet:

https://www.wdc.com/content/dam/wdc/website/downloadable_assets/eng/spec_data_sheet/2879-800002.pdf

You can see that upper operating temp per the spec sheet is 65 deg C, so you are well below the upper limit. To me, this makes sense. These drives are designed for use in NAS devices, which typically are multiple drive NAS devices. When you have multiple drives operating in close quarters like that, one can assuming that they are going to run a bit hot compared to a single drive operating all by itself. So, I would assume they design these drives to handle those higher typical single drive operating temperatures.

#6 nielsvanvelzen

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Posted 04 June 2017 - 03:20 AM

I do like these external docking stations and I prefer a high-quatliy, reliable model instead. Anything up to about $100 is fine. If you want a model that supports two 3.5" drives, both visible via eSATA at the same time, it needs to have an internal sata controller I think? I've seen reviews of some models (I think from startech) that damaged the file system on the drive, making it unreadable if you'd put it back directly on a sata port inside your pc...

 

Do you know of a one that would be good enough to trust my expensive harddrives and precious data? Preferably similar reputation as Asus, Seasonic, Noctua etc.

 

You could use a SATA to eSATA bracket to then allow you to hook the drive up externally. You then put the drive either in an external eSATA enclosure that has its own fans or use an external drive dock that might be cool enough with the drive "out in the open" or even blow air from a desk fan on it.

Example SATA to eSATA bracket (there are also version with two eSATA ports):

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B000GX4C7I/ref=oh_aui_detailpage_o02_s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Example of drive dock with eSATA, USB 3.0, and Firewire (cheaper options are out there, but this is a brand I use and trust...you can also get models that can handle two drives):

https://eshop.macsales.com/item/NewerTech/VU3ESFW8/

I won't offer an example of an external enclosure with a fan as they are pretty self explanatory.

I regularly use an eSATA bracket with my old Windows desktop and have one on order (arriving tomorrow) for my new build that I just finally got around to actually building (I could not find my spare brackets). It also fits you need to wanting to disconnect the drive at times.

Beyond that, an operating temperature of 45 deg C is well within operating specs for a WD Red. Here is the spec sheet:

https://www.wdc.com/content/dam/wdc/website/downloadable_assets/eng/spec_data_sheet/2879-800002.pdf

You can see that upper operating temp per the spec sheet is 65 deg C, so you are well below the upper limit. To me, this makes sense. These drives are designed for use in NAS devices, which typically are multiple drive NAS devices. When you have multiple drives operating in close quarters like that, one can assuming that they are going to run a bit hot compared to a single drive operating all by itself. So, I would assume they design these drives to handle those higher typical single drive operating temperatures.



#7 smax013

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Posted 04 June 2017 - 01:32 PM

I do like these external docking stations and I prefer a high-quatliy, reliable model instead. Anything up to about $100 is fine. If you want a model that supports two 3.5" drives, both visible via eSATA at the same time, it needs to have an internal sata controller I think? I've seen reviews of some models (I think from startech) that damaged the file system on the drive, making it unreadable if you'd put it back directly on a sata port inside your pc...
 
Do you know of a one that would be good enough to trust my expensive harddrives and precious data? Preferably similar reputation as Asus, Seasonic, Noctua etc.


The two drive model that I am using actually does not offer eSATA. It is USB 3.0 and Thunderbolt 2. Here is the link to the updated version that now supports USB 3.1:

https://eshop.macsales.com/item/OWC/TB2U3DKR2/

I have mine connected to my Mac by way of Thunderbolt. I have had no issues with it. It is mostly used with just one drive, but I did have two drives operating in it for a week or so with no issues. It is on the expensive side at about $270, but you can get just a USB 3.x model for less than $100:

https://eshop.macsales.com/item/OWC/U3DRVDCK2/

You are likely correct about eSATA. You likely would be better off using two separate eSATA docks. As I said, you can get eSATA brackets with two eSATA ports, but that then ties up two SATA ports from your motherboard (I have one such bracket in my older Windows desktop). Of course, the other overall option is just to get an eSATA PCI card, which then means you don't tied up any SATA ports on the motherboard.

#8 nielsvanvelzen

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Posted 04 June 2017 - 01:57 PM

All my SATA ports on my motherboard are already in use, so that option is not possible.

 

I have a bunch of eSATA enclosures with a backupdrive already inside. I connect them to my one and only eSATA port on my PC to backup data (and then store the enclosure with the drive inside in a datasafe).

 

It would be handy for me to (in the future) add one (or more) hard drive(s) to my system to increase storage capacity. Since I need the eSATA port to backup, I can't use that. In addition, I can't connect it via USB as I cannot backup it to the cloud then: my cloud backup does not permit USB drive backup, only SATA and of course eSATA (because I assume that windows cannot see the dfiference between a SATA drive and an eSATA drive).

 

Ideally I have an enclosure for 2-4 hard drives with an external power supply (like a NAS), which is reliable, has its own SATA controller that doesn't mess with NTFS file system and connects to a single eSATA port on my PC...

 

 

I do like these external docking stations and I prefer a high-quatliy, reliable model instead. Anything up to about $100 is fine. If you want a model that supports two 3.5" drives, both visible via eSATA at the same time, it needs to have an internal sata controller I think? I've seen reviews of some models (I think from startech) that damaged the file system on the drive, making it unreadable if you'd put it back directly on a sata port inside your pc...
 
Do you know of a one that would be good enough to trust my expensive harddrives and precious data? Preferably similar reputation as Asus, Seasonic, Noctua etc.


The two drive model that I am using actually does not offer eSATA. It is USB 3.0 and Thunderbolt 2. Here is the link to the updated version that now supports USB 3.1:

https://eshop.macsales.com/item/OWC/TB2U3DKR2/

I have mine connected to my Mac by way of Thunderbolt. I have had no issues with it. It is mostly used with just one drive, but I did have two drives operating in it for a week or so with no issues. It is on the expensive side at about $270, but you can get just a USB 3.x model for less than $100:

https://eshop.macsales.com/item/OWC/U3DRVDCK2/

You are likely correct about eSATA. You likely would be better off using two separate eSATA docks. As I said, you can get eSATA brackets with two eSATA ports, but that then ties up two SATA ports from your motherboard (I have one such bracket in my older Windows desktop). Of course, the other overall option is just to get an eSATA PCI card, which then means you don't tied up any SATA ports on the motherboard.

 



#9 smax013

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Posted 04 June 2017 - 04:03 PM

All my SATA ports on my motherboard are already in use, so that option is not possible.
 
I have a bunch of eSATA enclosures with a backupdrive already inside. I connect them to my one and only eSATA port on my PC to backup data (and then store the enclosure with the drive inside in a datasafe).


Then you already have at least one eSATA port that you can use.
 

It would be handy for me to (in the future) add one (or more) hard drive(s) to my system to increase storage capacity. Since I need the eSATA port to backup, I can't use that. In addition, I can't connect it via USB as I cannot backup it to the cloud then: my cloud backup does not permit USB drive backup, only SATA and of course eSATA (because I assume that windows cannot see the dfiference between a SATA drive and an eSATA drive).


Assuming you have an empty PCIe slot, you could add SATA or eSATA ports by way of a PCIe card. They are not that expensive.
 

Ideally I have an enclosure for 2-4 hard drives with an external power supply (like a NAS), which is reliable, has its own SATA controller that doesn't mess with NTFS file system and connects to a single eSATA port on my PC...


You would effectively be looking for enclosure that supports JBOD mode I believe. I don't believe that messes up NTFS files systems of individual drives, but I have to admit that I have never used that mode on any of my multiple disk enclosures. All my multiple drive enclosures (whether USB/Thunderbolt/Firewire/eSATA or actual Network Attached Storage) are all setup in an actual RAID array (RAID 1 for dual drive enclosures and RAID 5 for my NAS devices).

#10 nielsvanvelzen

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Posted 04 June 2017 - 04:19 PM

 

All my SATA ports on my motherboard are already in use, so that option is not possible.
 
I have a bunch of eSATA enclosures with a backupdrive already inside. I connect them to my one and only eSATA port on my PC to backup data (and then store the enclosure with the drive inside in a datasafe).


Then you already have at least one eSATA port that you can use.
 

It would be handy for me to (in the future) add one (or more) hard drive(s) to my system to increase storage capacity. Since I need the eSATA port to backup, I can't use that. In addition, I can't connect it via USB as I cannot backup it to the cloud then: my cloud backup does not permit USB drive backup, only SATA and of course eSATA (because I assume that windows cannot see the dfiference between a SATA drive and an eSATA drive).


Assuming you have an empty PCIe slot, you could add SATA or eSATA ports by way of a PCIe card. They are not that expensive.
 

Ideally I have an enclosure for 2-4 hard drives with an external power supply (like a NAS), which is reliable, has its own SATA controller that doesn't mess with NTFS file system and connects to a single eSATA port on my PC...


You would effectively be looking for enclosure that supports JBOD mode I believe. I don't believe that messes up NTFS files systems of individual drives, but I have to admit that I have never used that mode on any of my multiple disk enclosures. All my multiple drive enclosures (whether USB/Thunderbolt/Firewire/eSATA or actual Network Attached Storage) are all setup in an actual RAID array (RAID 1 for dual drive enclosures and RAID 5 for my NAS devices).

 

 

My motherboard (Asrock Fatal1ty Z77 Professional) has 3x PCIe x16 slots, of which only one is in use :)

Which card would you recommend? I have to be certain it can support hard drives larger than 2tb (which four of my sata ports do not).



#11 smax013

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Posted 04 June 2017 - 04:37 PM

My motherboard (Asrock Fatal1ty Z77 Professional) has 3x PCIe x16 slots, of which only one is in use :)
Which card would you recommend? I have to be certain it can support hard drives larger than 2tb (which four of my sata ports do not).


I don't necessarily have one that I have used myself, so I don't have one that I would recommend per se.

I can say that I am considering this one myself:

https://eshop.macsales.com/item/Newer%20Technology/MXPCIE6G3S2/

You can also get it on Amazon through a 3rd party seller (which is an entity owned by OWC, I believe) for about $10 less...at least I believe it is the same model:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00B33UGIO/ref=ox_sc_act_title_1?ie=UTF8&psc=1&smid=A3UW28G9WPPLAW

I have used other NewerTech brand equipment (a couple of external docks and at least one dual drive external enclosure) with no problems, so it is a brand that I trust.

They also do offer a version with 4 eSATA ports:

https://eshop.macsales.com/item/NewerTech/MXPCIE6GRS4E/

The one potential advantage of at least looking on the OWC (aka macsale.com) site is that they offer chat support for sales, so you should be able to ask whether or not it will work with drives larger than 2 TB (and there is the fact that the description on the OWC site is way better than Amazon's). You can still then buy through Amazon for the cheaper price if you want.




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