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Create single partition using space from two different physical drives


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#1 Dark Magician Girl

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 09:48 PM

Does Windows 10 allow creating a single partition using unallocated space from two different hard disk drives? 

 

Let's say I have two internal hard disk drives. One drive is 1.84 TB; the other is 2.72 TB. The first drive contains the C: drive, which is 100 GB, leaving 1.74 TB free. Can the 1.74 TB from the first drive be combined with the 2.72 TB from the second drive to form a single partition? 

 

I am aware that multiple drives can be combined into one large volume like so:

 

https://www.windowscentral.com/how-create-one-large-volume-using-multiple-hard-drives-windows-10

 

But in my case, one of the drives will also contain the system volume.



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#2 britechguy

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 09:55 PM

If you wish to create a spanned volume using part of the drive that contains C: then you can simply partition it into two separate logical drives (leaving sufficient breathing room for Windows to do the things it needs to do, e.g., swap files, etc., and for any user data, etc.) and span that second logical drive and the other physical drive.

 

If I'm wrong I am certain someone will correct me, but I don't think it matters whether you're talking physical versus logical drives.  I seem to recall people creating spanned drives with "halves" of more than two physical hard drives each of which had been partitioned into two logical drives.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

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#3 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 06:01 AM

In Windows 10 is it quite easy to combine two separate physical drives into one partition.

 

https://www.howtogeek.com/109380/how-to-use-windows-8s-storage-spaces-to-mirror-combine-drives/


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#4 Dark Magician Girl

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Posted 03 June 2017 - 06:48 PM

In Windows 10 is it quite easy to combine two separate physical drives into one partition.

 

https://www.howtogeek.com/109380/how-to-use-windows-8s-storage-spaces-to-mirror-combine-drives/

 

That article seems to explain how to combine entire drives. It would work if I had a solid state drive that contains only the operating system and used multiple hard disk drives for data. I want to combine D:Data 0 and E:Data 1 into a single partition with 4556.9 GB of space. Is this possible? 

 

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#5 Dark Magician Girl

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Posted 03 June 2017 - 06:53 PM

If you wish to create a spanned volume using part of the drive that contains C: then you can simply partition it into two separate logical drives (leaving sufficient breathing room for Windows to do the things it needs to do, e.g., swap files, etc., and for any user data, etc.) and span that second logical drive and the other physical drive.

 

If I'm wrong I am certain someone will correct me, but I don't think it matters whether you're talking physical versus logical drives.  I seem to recall people creating spanned drives with "halves" of more than two physical hard drives each of which had been partitioned into two logical drives.

 

Are you saying I can span D:Data 0 with Disk 2 or E:Data 1 (see above image)? 



#6 britechguy

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Posted 03 June 2017 - 07:39 PM

Yes.  That is the definition of a spanned drive, and it's typically how and why they are used.

 

If you have literally a single drive, that had been partitioned into logical drives, you could simply merge partitions to get a single larger space.  Spanning allows you to take partitions on several physical drives and to create one logical drive from same.

 

Also, it would make no sense to take D: on the Disk 1 and span it with "unnamed" partition and E: on Disk 2.  You would merge "unnamed" and E: if you really wanted all of the space on that drive (probably all into E:) and then span D: on Disk 1 and E: on Disk 2.


Edited by britechguy, 03 June 2017 - 07:44 PM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

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#7 Dark Magician Girl

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Posted 03 June 2017 - 11:30 PM

Okay. So, merge "other" with E: and then span D: on Disk 1 and E: on Disk 2, which will produce a single volume from them. 

 

Can D: on Disk 1 be merged with E: Disk 2, or do they have to be spanned?

 

Also, will spanning erase existing data? 



#8 britechguy

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Posted 04 June 2017 - 12:07 AM

You cannot literally merge partitions on separate devices.  Spanning is the functional equivalent of merging partitions but across multiple devices.

 

I cannot honestly recall whether spanning erases data, but I don't think so.  If you read up on actually setting up a spanned volume this will be covered.  It's been too long since I last did this and when I did do it the partitions on the drives were empty, so there was no need for me to consider possible data erasure.

 

It is much easier to actually read the tutorial material out there about this to get an accurate picture of exactly what's involved and how to do it.  If you have specific questions after doing so then give direct reference to the material you've read and the question(s) that have arisen.  There are lots of tutorials to choose from, so have a look at several to see which of them is written in a style that's most suited to you.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#9 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 04 June 2017 - 09:18 AM

Everything that I have read about spanning drives is that it erases all data that is present. Because of this, it is advisable to store your data on a hard drive that can be disconnected from your system and to do this operation on initially setting up the system.


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#10 Dark Magician Girl

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 01:17 AM

I did some searching. According to MiniTool, a spanned volume is created by combining unallocated space across multiple drives, so I suppose I would need to erase everything first. Also, it seems a spanned volume can be created using unallocated space from only two or more dynamic disks. However, I read that Windows will neither run nor install on a dynamic disk. If this is the case, I am not sure how I can create a spanned volume using unallocated space from the disk containing C: because I supposedly cannot make a dive containing C: into a dynamic disk. 



#11 Kilroy

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Posted 05 June 2017 - 03:24 PM

You might want to take a moment to think about data security.  Most spanned JBOD (Just a Bunch of Disk) solutions will lose all data if any drive fails.



#12 Dark Magician Girl

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Posted 12 June 2017 - 05:56 AM

You might want to take a moment to think about data security.  Most spanned JBOD (Just a Bunch of Disk) solutions will lose all data if any drive fails.

 

Well, yeah. That is why the data will be backed up elsewhere, either an external drive or a cloud storage service. I haven't decided which one. Amazon Cloud Drive is very appealing. It combined with Arq Backup may be a great solution. I assume a failing spanned volume won't affect the C: volume nor other volumes that are not part of the spanned volume. 






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