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Mistake I made when first setting up Lubuntu


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#1 cooljay

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 04:04 PM

I tried to explain this in a previous thread but could not make it clear, I think.

 

I found now exactly what went wrong, and maybe it can be fixed. Maybe not, and I should start from scratch.

 

 

Here is what it says in the Debian Handbook: https://debian-handbook.info/browse/stable/sect.installation-steps.html#id-1.7.12.10

 

4.2.9. Administrator Password
The super-user root account, reserved for the machine's administrator, is automatically created during installation; this is why a password is requested. The installer also asks for a confirmation of the password to prevent any input error which would later be difficult to amend.

 

4.2.10. Creating the First User
Debian also imposes the creation of a standard user account so that the administrator doesn't get into the bad habit of working as root. The precautionary principle essentially means that each task is performed with the minimum required rights, in order to limit the damage caused by human error. This is why the installer will ask for the complete name of this first user, their username, and their password (twice, to prevent the risk of erroneous input).
 
I do not, to my knowledge, have a super-user root account. If I do, it's the same as the one I use at login.
 
Can someone let me know what, if anything, I can do about this?
 
 


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#2 DeimosChaos

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 04:15 PM

The super user root account is always just named 'root'. All systems have it. Typically you set the password at install (I think Ubuntu uses the same password for root as for your account if you set your account as the admin... its been a while since I have installed though).


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#3 The-Toolman

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 04:17 PM

Hey cooljay,

 

What you posted above (Administrator Password & Creating the First User) I believe only holds true in Debian and Debian based Linux distros and not in Ubuntu or Ubuntu based distros.

 

If this isn't true than someone please correct me.


Edited by The-Toolman, 30 May 2017 - 04:48 PM.

Under certain circumstances, profanity provides a relief denied even to prayer.

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Inspiration can be found in a pile of junk. Sometimes, you can put it together with a good imagination and invent something.

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#4 DeimosChaos

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 04:20 PM

Nvm on my post. You gotta set the root password with your 'sudo' enabled account.

sudo passwd root

I believe what the tool-man says is true. The instructions are only for Debian. 


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#5 cooljay

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 04:21 PM

Toolman: it isn't true. ;)

 

since I posted the new thread, the chickens came home to roost, so to speak.

 

I want to install a GNOME desktop which finally  is something that requires root. So in the terminal, it asks me, are you root? And believe me, it does NOT accept my password. It isn't even invisible.



#6 cooljay

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 04:26 PM

I think I found how to fix it.

https://askubuntu.com/questions/24006/how-do-i-reset-a-lost-administrative-password

 

I'll try this later and report back.

Gotta run now.



#7 The-Toolman

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 04:35 PM

Toolman: it isn't true. ;)

 

since I posted the new thread, the chickens came home to roost, so to speak.

 

I want to install a GNOME desktop which finally  is something that requires root. So in the terminal, it asks me, are you root? And believe me, it does NOT accept my password. It isn't even invisible.

If this is a new install and this being the case than I would do a complete new clean install as it would be a lot easier in my opinion by what you are saying in your posts.

 

This may help and also take a look at page 15.

 

http://files.ubuntu-manual.org/manuals/getting-started-with-ubuntu/16.04/en_US/screen/Getting%20Started%20with%20Ubuntu%2016.04.pdf


Edited by The-Toolman, 30 May 2017 - 04:39 PM.

Under certain circumstances, profanity provides a relief denied even to prayer.

(Mark Twain)

 

Inspiration can be found in a pile of junk. Sometimes, you can put it together with a good imagination and invent something.

(Thomas Edison)


#8 synergy513

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 05:34 PM

this worked for me, although at the passwd prompt, you have to press enter, then

enter it again then end the command line session, then once in your OS, go to "about me" and change it to whatever, ,  i had simple pw kicked back about 5 times, unitl i used more than 7 characters with numbers included  when i tried to change it in the OS, the command line took a simple one though

 

https://sites.google.com/site/easylinuxtipsproject/5


Edited by synergy513, 30 May 2017 - 05:39 PM.

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#9 The-Toolman

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 06:16 PM

An excellent website which I use and have used a lot myself.

 

https://sites.google.com/site/easylinuxtipsproject/


Under certain circumstances, profanity provides a relief denied even to prayer.

(Mark Twain)

 

Inspiration can be found in a pile of junk. Sometimes, you can put it together with a good imagination and invent something.

(Thomas Edison)


#10 cooljay

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 06:41 PM

Thanks guys for those 2 links. I'll look at the Ubuntu manual. If the booting in recovery mode doesn't pan out i probably will just reinstall it. If I do, I'm assuming it means installing over the current version, right? On a new usb stick?

 

Also, the easylinuxtips guy is by the way the one who says disable automatic uploads. He also thinks antivirus programs are harmful and achieve the opposite of what they are meant for. Just sayin.

 

I kind of like his breezy style. I think it's one of those cases, where you take the good, leave the absurd. He's definitely saved in my bookmarks.



#11 cooljay

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 07:03 PM

If I do a reinstall, maybe I should install Ubuntu instead of Lubuntu? Could my notebook handle Ubuntu? It has 1 GB ram, 149 GB hard drive.



#12 The-Toolman

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 07:10 PM

If I do a reinstall, maybe I should install Ubuntu instead of Lubuntu? Could my notebook handle Ubuntu? It has 1 GB ram, 149 GB hard drive.

Hey cooljay,

 

I would stay with Lubuntu 16.04 as with only 1gig of ram Ubuntu may not run very well as it is very resource demanding and also uncertain if you graphics would be capable to run it.


Under certain circumstances, profanity provides a relief denied even to prayer.

(Mark Twain)

 

Inspiration can be found in a pile of junk. Sometimes, you can put it together with a good imagination and invent something.

(Thomas Edison)


#13 The-Toolman

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 07:21 PM

Also, the easylinuxtips guy is by the way the one who says disable automatic uploads. He also thinks antivirus programs are harmful and achieve the opposite of what they are meant for.

 

 

I have my automatic updates disabled although I have enabled updates to be displayed immediately.

The reason for this is to have complete control of what is going to be installed.

 

Anti-virus isn't needed.

Make sure that the UFW firewall is enabled which can be done through the "Command Terminal".

 

Read this and understand before doing any of these tweaks.

 

https://sites.google.com/site/easylinuxtipsproject/first-lubuntu


Under certain circumstances, profanity provides a relief denied even to prayer.

(Mark Twain)

 

Inspiration can be found in a pile of junk. Sometimes, you can put it together with a good imagination and invent something.

(Thomas Edison)


#14 cooljay

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 11:08 PM

Firewall is enabled. Also, I agree about Ubuntu. I looked up the system requirements. I'll reinstall Lubuntu, but I still want a GNOME desktop.



#15 DeimosChaos

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Posted 31 May 2017 - 08:01 AM

Toolman: it isn't true. ;)

 

since I posted the new thread, the chickens came home to roost, so to speak.

 

I want to install a GNOME desktop which finally  is something that requires root. So in the terminal, it asks me, are you root? And believe me, it does NOT accept my password. It isn't even invisible.

My guess is you never set your account to be a 'sudo' user upon install (admin account). Installing gnome should just be:

sudo apt-get install gnome-desktop

Edited by DeimosChaos, 31 May 2017 - 08:02 AM.

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