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Security updates for Vista after end of support - Windows Server 2008 patches


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#1 Sardoc

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Posted 29 May 2017 - 09:09 PM

Hi everybody.

 

As we all know, Windows Vista is no longer supported by Microsoft in any way, shape or form. This means there will be no more updates for it. There is some good news, though. Due to Windows Vista and Windows Server 2008 sharing the same codebase, it is possible to install WS2008 security updates on Vista. This way you might be able to receive security updates until January 2020.

 

In this thread, I will compile a list of monthly updates for WS2008, and provide feedback on how the installation process went on a virtual machine running Win Vista x64. If you're interested and want to take this opportunity, be my guest, though be advised that while the updates will most likely install successfully, you're still doing this at your own risk.

 

 

 

Please note that if you are having problems with Windows Update taking hours or days to check for updates, and/or consuming your CPU, please check this thread.

 

So without further ado, this is a list of WS 2008 updates for the month of May 2017 that I attempted to install on Win Vista. In general I've provided Microsoft Update Catalog links which allow you to choose either the 32 bit or 64 bit version, however, for .Net installers, I've provided direct download links separately to avoid Microsoft's stupid and confusing bundling of updates, which lumps updates with different KB numbers together. You will need to download them and install manually, as Windows Update will NOT find them. Vista is unsupported now, remember? :-)

 

 

 

 

Here they are:

 

WS2008 security updates: KB4018196, KB4018466, KB4018556, KB4018821, KB4018885, KB4018927, KB4019149, KB4019204, KB4019206 (for each of these choose the correct 32 or 64 bit system version)

 

Internet Explorer 9: KB4018271 (please note that you want to download the Internet Explorer 9 version package for Windows Server 2008 without the "R2", but NOT the IE11 version for Windows Server 2008 R2, which is the Windows 7 server equivalent. Neither Vista, nor 2008 without R2 support IE11. Also choose the correct 32 or 64 bit system version)

 

DST changes: KB4015193 (again, you want to get the version for WS 2008 without "R2". Also choose the correct 32 or 64 bit system version)

 

.Net 4.6: ndp46-kb4014511 (for 32 bit systems and 64 bit systems) and ndp46-kb4020503 (for 32 bit systems and 64 bit systems)

 

.Net 4.5.2 (ignore this one if you're using .Net4.6, which supersedes 4.5.2): ndp45-kb4020507 (download the correct 32 or 64 bit system version) and ndp45-kb4014514 (for 32 bit systems and 64 bit systems)

 

.Net 2.0: KB4014502 (for 32 bit systems and 64 bit systems) and KB4020511 (choose the correct 32 or 64 bit system version)

 

Every update installed correctly, though WS2008 security update KB4018196 said it wasn't applicable. Also, I haven't installed .Net 4.5.2 updates, as I'm using .Net 4.6, which supersedes it.

 

The latest supported version of .Net Framework for Windows Vista & Server 2008 is 4.6.1. Installing anything newer than this (4.6.2 or 4.7) is not possible.


Edited by Sardoc, 30 May 2017 - 08:55 PM.


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#2 joezapp

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Posted 29 May 2017 - 10:09 PM

Very nice of you to do this for us, Sardoc! I'm waiting for other Vista owners to chime in here before I take the plunge. In the meantime, please update us on any changes in your system's performance as you move along with this, good or bad. Thank you!



#3 Sardoc

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 08:49 PM

Yes please, ladies and gents, do share your feedback if you've tried it. It can be about anything: whether everything installed just fine, some updates failed or said they weren't applicable, maybe everything ran fine or there were stability/performance/compatibility issues, there were bluescreens, something stopped working or started working, something was slow or just the opposite, you know: ANYTHING. There shouldn't be anything extreme, as there are only security updates and possibly bugfixes released for WS2008 (so no new features or under the hood engineering), but please do feel free to report anything positive, negative or indifferent.

 

I have seen questions whether sfc /scannow would work if system files became corrupt on a Vista machine where WS2008 updates have been installed. My prediction is "yes", due to the systems sharing the same codebase. I don't see a reason why it wouldn't, but it will need to be tested regardless just to be sure.



#4 Sardoc

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 10:35 AM

Hello, everyone!

 

Welcome to June 2017, the first month where Vista receives its own updates despite being unsupported. Win XP, Win 8 and Win Server 2003 received the same treatment due to the wide availability of NSA-leaked exploit tools, and the potential severity of the chaos they could cause. Tut tut, NSA. Here is Microsoft's official post about the issue, and a 3rd party source explaining what happened and why in more detail. Please note that this is a one-off rather than expected practice of patching unsupported products, so enjoy it while it lasts, but don't expect Microsoft to suddenly bring back unsupported systems from the dead.

 

Not a single one of those updates for Vista was released to Windows Update for whatever reason, but they were listed by Microsoft to download and install manually. Please let me know if they suddenly appear in your Windows Update client.

 

As usual, I've gone through Microsoft's messy, unbearably confusing and unnecessarily complicated list of updates and will post them here. Since some of last month's updates have now been released for Vista as well, I will put a note next to the ones released released in May previously.

 

Here's the list for Vista dedicated updates for June 2017:

 

Vista post-end of support patches: KB4018466 (originally listed in May 2017 updates for WS2008, released for Vista as well in June 2017), KB4021903 (not previously released), KB4024402 (not previously released), KB4019204 (originally listed in May 2017 updates for WS2008, released for Vista as well in June 2017).

 

Internet Explorer 9 for Vista post-end of support patches: KB4018271 (originally listed in May 2017 updates for WS2008, released for Vista as well in June 2017).

 

Every single one of these 5 installed fine, as they are dedicated Vista updates.

 

 

 

 

And here are the Windows Server 2008 patches, not released for Vista, for June 2017:

 

Windows Server 2008 security fixes: KB4021923, KB4022008, KB4022010, KB4022013, KB4022883, KB4022884, KB4022887, KB4018106 (this particular one is listed as 64 bit-only on the security list, but there is a 32 bit version. Must have been a human error on Microsoft's side). For all of these, choose the desired 32 or 64 bit version. All of them installed fine on my Vista machine.

 

There was also a 64 bit-only security update KB3217845, with no 32 bit version at all. When trying to install this one on my Vista machine, it said this update was not applicable to my system.

 

Internet Explorer 9: KB4021558 (this particular one is listed as 32 bit-only on the security list, but there is a 64 bit version. Must have been a human error on Microsoft's side). Installed fine on my Vista machine.

 

Nothing for .Net this month.

 

Enjoy.


Edited by Sardoc, 16 June 2017 - 10:36 AM.


#5 KYKaren

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Posted 16 June 2017 - 02:13 PM

 

....

.Net 4.6: ndp46-kb4014511 (for 32 bit systems and 64 bit systems) and ndp46-kb4020503 (for 32 bit systems and 64 bit systems)

 

.Net 4.5.2 (ignore this one if you're using .Net4.6, which supersedes 4.5.2): ndp45-kb4020507 (download the correct 32 or 64 bit system version) and ndp45-kb4014514 (for 32 bit systems and 64 bit systems)

 

.Net 2.0: KB4014502 (for 32 bit systems and 64 bit systems) and KB4020511 (choose the correct 32 or 64 bit system version)

 

The latest supported version of .Net Framework for Windows Vista & Server 2008 is 4.6.1. Installing anything newer than this (4.6.2 or 4.7) is not possible.

How do I know which versions of .NET I have?  The last Installed Update for my Vista XP2 x86 machine was .NET 4.5.2 on April 12, 2017. The last time .NET 3.5 is listed in Installed Updates is Oct 9, 2013.  (No other .NET versions listed in Installed Updates between April 2017 and Oct 2013.)

 

However, Update History lists Security and Quality Rollup for .NET Framework 2.0, 3.0, 4.5.2, 4.6 on Windows Vista SP2 and Server 2008 SP2 in April 2017, December 2016, and in November 2016 (2.0 is not in the title for November).   It also lists Security Update for 2.0 in July 2016, May 2016, March 2016, and February 2016  And the same for 4.52 in July, 2016, May 2016, March 2016, and February 2016  And the same for 3.0 in April 2016 and March 2016.


Edited by KYKaren, 16 June 2017 - 02:20 PM.


#6 Sardoc

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Posted 17 June 2017 - 03:18 AM

 

 

....

.Net 4.6: ndp46-kb4014511 (for 32 bit systems and 64 bit systems) and ndp46-kb4020503 (for 32 bit systems and 64 bit systems)

 

.Net 4.5.2 (ignore this one if you're using .Net4.6, which supersedes 4.5.2): ndp45-kb4020507 (download the correct 32 or 64 bit system version) and ndp45-kb4014514 (for 32 bit systems and 64 bit systems)

 

.Net 2.0: KB4014502 (for 32 bit systems and 64 bit systems) and KB4020511 (choose the correct 32 or 64 bit system version)

 

The latest supported version of .Net Framework for Windows Vista & Server 2008 is 4.6.1. Installing anything newer than this (4.6.2 or 4.7) is not possible.

How do I know which versions of .NET I have?  The last Installed Update for my Vista XP2 x86 machine was .NET 4.5.2 on April 12, 2017. The last time .NET 3.5 is listed in Installed Updates is Oct 9, 2013.  (No other .NET versions listed in Installed Updates between April 2017 and Oct 2013.)

 

However, Update History lists Security and Quality Rollup for .NET Framework 2.0, 3.0, 4.5.2, 4.6 on Windows Vista SP2 and Server 2008 SP2 in April 2017, December 2016, and in November 2016 (2.0 is not in the title for November).   It also lists Security Update for 2.0 in July 2016, May 2016, March 2016, and February 2016  And the same for 4.52 in July, 2016, May 2016, March 2016, and February 2016  And the same for 3.0 in April 2016 and March 2016.

 

You can check Microsoft's article to determine which one you have.

 

.Net 3.0 was included in Vista and WS2008. It replaces version 2.0. When Win 7 was released, it shipped with version 3.5, which replaces both 2.0 and 3.0. It was released for Vista later and can be installed on this system just fine. It is the latest release in the 3.x series. Since Microsoft is still patching 2.0, I suppose it's just a 2-in-1, with versions 2.x and 3.x co-existing.

 

.Net 4 series is a whole different thing. It has nothing to do with versions 2.x or 3.x. So far, there have been 4 major releases: 4.0, then 4.5 (with patches 4.5.1 and 4.5.2), then 4.6 (with patches 4.6.1 and 4.6.2), and the latest 4.7. For Windows Vista, the latest available in this series is 4.6.1. Later versions will not install on this system.

Here is the release history in case you're interested.



#7 cafejose

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Posted 17 June 2017 - 03:53 AM

Sardoc,

Thanks for the Windows Update information for june 2017.  The five main items as standalone installers were installed mostly fine.  I still do not understand and do not know what to do about the .NET updates.  Regarding using the standalone installers for the regular updates,  I find less trouble if after running each installer, to choose CLOSE button after each install of update is run; otherwise, my machine/s  give me a dark dim screen instead of a normal shutdown/restart; and in many cases, my computer or computers will not finish to shutdown before restart and I need to press on the power button and hold until machine shuts, and then make a fresh startup.  Then, if any "configuring" was needed, they will run before computer reaches the normal desktop.



#8 Sardoc

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Posted 17 June 2017 - 07:52 AM

Sardoc,

Thanks for the Windows Update information for june 2017.  The five main items as standalone installers were installed mostly fine.  I still do not understand and do not know what to do about the .NET updates.  Regarding using the standalone installers for the regular updates,  I find less trouble if after running each installer, to choose CLOSE button after each install of update is run; otherwise, my machine/s  give me a dark dim screen instead of a normal shutdown/restart; and in many cases, my computer or computers will not finish to shutdown before restart and I need to press on the power button and hold until machine shuts, and then make a fresh startup.  Then, if any "configuring" was needed, they will run before computer reaches the normal desktop.

.Net 2.0 is included in Vista, so you can go ahead and install these updates right away.

 

.Net series 4 does not come with the system, it is installed separately. The latest available for Vista is version 4.6.1. It replaces every previous version of series 4 (4.0, 4.5, 4.5.1, 4.5.2, 4.6), so there's no need to install updates for the previous version (4.5). I don't know which one you have installed, but you can check using this guide by Microsoft.



#9 JodyThornton

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Posted Yesterday, 03:40 PM

We have been discussing this over at MSFN for awhile now.  Good to see others embracing this idea.

http://www.msfn.org/board/topic/176686-server-2008-updates-on-windows-vista/

 

Originally we we looking at Windows 8 (the original release the went out of support in January 2016), and seeing if Windows Server 2012 updates could be used.  That was also successful.

http://www.msfn.org/board/topic/175105-server-2012-updates-on-windows-8/



#10 jwoods301

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Posted Yesterday, 03:44 PM

I would do a full disk image backup before doing anything like this in case it goes sideways.



#11 JodyThornton

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Posted Yesterday, 03:48 PM

I performed backups, but I 'll also say this.  The updates are codebase-identical.  I have been updating Windows 8 with Server 2012 patches for a year and a half.  Not only has it worked with aplomb, but some of the updates around March of 2016 (I think it was a platform update) appears to have improved video and stability.

 

It has proven to be quite reliable.

:)



#12 jwoods301

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Posted Yesterday, 03:57 PM

I would add that doing frequent disk image backups and daily backups of volatile (personal) data is critical for more than just updates going sideways.



#13 Sardoc

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Posted Yesterday, 06:16 PM

Everyone is welcome to try this, and share their results. Any feedback, ranging from extremely positive to a PC that spontaneously combusts (... ok, hopefully it's not gonna be THAT bad!), is welcome feedback.

 

If you think a backup will be useful, do it, of course. I do all of this on a virtual machine, so I don't lose anything, but you can't go wrong with backups.



#14 KYKaren

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Posted Yesterday, 07:02 PM

We have been discussing this over at MSFN for awhile now.  Good to see others embracing this idea.

http://www.msfn.org/board/topic/176686-server-2008-updates-on-windows-vista/

 

Originally we we looking at Windows 8 (the original release the went out of support in January 2016), and seeing if Windows Server 2012 updates could be used.  That was also successful.

http://www.msfn.org/board/topic/175105-server-2012-updates-on-windows-8/

I went to the msfn URL and then went to the mega.nz URL which is supposed to have all of the downloads.   I see NFW folders there..  What is SO?  What is SQR?  There seem to be 3 choices for each NFW version (plain, SO, and SQR).



#15 Sardoc

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Posted Today, 06:37 AM

SO I think stands for "Security Only", whereas the SQR is probably "Security and Quality Release".






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    Sardoc