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Extend NW - Never Seen This Answered


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#1 Zeuszoos

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Posted 26 May 2017 - 04:59 PM

Hi,

I use my phone and tablet for the Internet, not a PC/Laptop. It ocurred to me that all of the Extension options (AP, Repeater, et al) are designed to address situations that would deal with a stationary computer.

In other words, if Router A IP ends in 1 and Router B (AP) ends in 2 and I'm walking from one end of the house to the other with my phone, how would it see the AP (Router B), since it's a different IP and my phone is already connected to the IP for Router A?

I have a Static IP. Same point either way though.

What I need, is to be able to walk around the house and be connected to whichever of the two is stronger. Can this be done, without me having to keep switching the connection manually?

There may just be a "Connect to Strongest", which I think can be done on my phone, but that won't work for me, because somehow, some neighbor has a WiFi signal that actually shows stronger than mine in my own house, so that won't work.

Neither will antennas, since they're inside of the unit.

I'm sure the same question applies, even if I am using a laptop that I'm moving from place to place in the home. :-)

So can it be done?

Thanks! :-)

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#2 smax013

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Posted 26 May 2017 - 06:43 PM

A signal from a neighbor's WiFi network should not be an issue. For most devices that connect to WiFi, they will not switch to a network your have never connected to in the past unless you specifically have it set to do that (i.e. "auto join" new, previously unused WiFi networks)...but it is a good idea to have such a function turned off as it is a good way to accidentally connect to a malicious "fake" network.

Note: For the following, it is assumed that your extender option actually extends your network...that is, you use the same SSID (aka network name) through out the house and the "system" then connects to the appropriate access point/device.

So, assuming you do not have the "auto join" function turn on, you would only switch between networks your have connected to in the past. Unless you have connected to your neighbor's network in the past, then you would not switch to it. So, that presumably means you should only switch between your networks.

Now as to switching between your networks, that will depend on how the device prioritizes WiFi connections AND how your extension option offers up the network from it. Most devices will go to "strongest" signal, I believe. Others might stick too much with the connection it has until that connection effectively cuts out and then grab the a new network...if so, you can typically then "force" the situation by temporarily turning off WiFi on the device.

If OTOH, you have different SSIDs for different parts of the house, then above is not applicable. In this case, your device will typically stay with the access point it is connected to until it loses the connection even if another network has a stronger signal. You will either have to manually switch to the other SSID or try the WiFi on/off thing (but then, it will matter how the device prioritizes which network it connects to...some have a list you can reorder...others will default back to the one last connected to first).

#3 Wand3r3r

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Posted 27 May 2017 - 12:10 AM

"It ocurred to me that all of the Extension options (AP, Repeater, et al) are designed to address situations that would deal with a stationary computer."

 

Sorry but that is not correct.  Wired and wifi devices.

 

"Can this be done, without me having to keep switching the connection manually?"

 

1. you can put in a WDS network

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wireless_distribution_system

2. you can put in a mesh network

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wireless_mesh_network



#4 Zeuszoos

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Posted 27 May 2017 - 02:21 PM

Dear Smax013,

I agree with everything you said, of course. :-)

But here's the weird thing and you're probably not going to believe this (I might not), but I assure you that it's both true and accurate.

There are actually two of these networks that are stronger than mine in my own house. Not only that, but neither is Secure. They're both Open networks. However, when my devices (new, just setting them up) connected to one automatically, there was no Internet access, nor with the other. I tried it just for kicks. My wife told me after I posted though that it's not our neighbors, because they've changed on both sides of us.

So I don't know where these signals are coming from, but they're Open, so anything can connect, they don't allow Internet access and they're MONSTER STRONG! The "WiFi bars" (curved lines) are always fully lit up and when I look at actual signal output for them, they destroy mine! :-)

There is a storage unit place in the next property, but that would be a weird setup for a business and there's a physical 8 ft concrete wall between us and them and I don't see how it could reach this far! I'll investigate and find it though. My curiosity is up now. :-)

But once I set up my device to mine, it does connect to it first now. But my point with the above is that if I were to set it to auto-switch to the strongest signal to try to get it to switch back and forth between the two as I move about, it would always connect to one of those other networks.

FYI, I live in an apartment, so that's why I thought it was a neighbor.

What I *may* do, is set up my AP again and since I spend most of my time in the end of the house, just set the stuff at this end (most of the time) to connect to it and deal with a weaker signal when I move about and then connect everything stationary at the other end of my house to the main Router and kind of split the network.

Thank you very much for your time, my friend! I appreciate it very much! :-)

#5 Zeuszoos

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Posted 27 May 2017 - 02:27 PM

Dear Wand3r3r,

Those are very intriguing (sp?) solutions! :-)

I do remember reading about those a long time ago, in a far away and distant galaxy, now that I see them again. :-)

I'll read up on them again, thank you.

Thank you very much for your time, my friend! I appreciate it very much! :-)

#6 Zeuszoos

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Posted 27 May 2017 - 03:02 PM

Hi,

Just to explain, I have read about people who buy repeaters, et al, to extend their WiFi out onto their porch or wherever and that's why I thought this would be easy at first.

But then I saw where it gets configured with an IP of its own, which prompted my question here before I bought one, which is how laptops/devices connect as you're moving around.

The "porch" example is real, which sounded to me like the guy is taking his laptop out onto the porch when he wants to, so okay, but if the repeater has a different IP, then how can he just walk out to his porch (where he didn't have enough signal befote) with his laptop and just be connected with good signal now, without having to manually connect each time? At least he didn't mention that he was in his product review.

I.e., I don't think the average person buying these just to extend their home network (at least not everyone in the home) knows to "look for and connect to the repeater now, because I'm out on the porch now".

This is what lead to my question of how it is working and to make sure I'll be able to do what it sounds like it's doing, before I bought one, because it has a different IP, so how is that going to happen?

Quick question please: If I do decide to just set up the other Router I have as an AP and split the network (that Router does have an actual "AP Mode"), do I make the SSID the same as it is in the Main Router? Or do I use a different SSID in the AP?

Thank You!!!

#7 smax013

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Posted 27 May 2017 - 03:14 PM

There are actually two of these networks that are stronger than mine in my own house. Not only that, but neither is Secure. They're both Open networks. However, when my devices (new, just setting them up) connected to one automatically, there was no Internet access, nor with the other. I tried it just for kicks. My wife told me after I posted though that it's not our neighbors, because they've changed on both sides of us.


Every WiFi device that I have ever used will not automatically connect to an "unknown" WiFi SSID (i.e. one that the device has never connected to before) without some sort of input from the user (i.e. you confirming that you want to connect to that WiFi SSID). The only way I have ever encountered such a situation might have been the WiFi device had a setting that allowed that ability, but that is generally something that you DO NOT want to have it set to do (i.e. automatically connect to unknown networks), especially in today's world where people will create open "fake" networks for the nefarious purposes. Every device I have ever used either required you to manually select the network from the list to which you want to connect or maybe will offer a popup say "hey, here is this network that you might want to connect to...do you want to connect to it?" (not those exact words obviously, but you get the idea) but you then need to click "yes I want to connect to this network"...at least when it comes to unknown networks. And personally, I tend to turn off this second approach (i.e. whether the device asks if you want to connect to unknown networks) as it usually annoys me and I don't connect to networks I don't know.

Of course, if it is a known network (i.e. you have connected to it in the past), then just about any WiFi device I have ever used will automatically reconnect to that network in the future. This includes any network of the same name/SSID even if it is not the same physical network you connected to in the past. For example, for years, Linksys routers would come with the SSID set to "linksys" by default and set by default with no encryption enabled (i.e. "open"). So, if you connected to one Linksys router this way, your device (laptop, smartphone, tablet, etc) would then connect to any other WiFi SSID set this way. Some nefarious types then started to take advantage of this by setting up fake WiFi networks in public places using the "linksys" SSID and as an open network...and then have tons of devices connect to it since those devices "knew" and remembered that network. Thus, for me personally, I tend to "prune" my list of known networks (of say hotel chain network IDs since they tend to use the same SSID at all their hotels and are frequently open) frequently on my devices as most devices will allow you to "forget"/delete a known network, effectively turning it back into an unknown network.

So, if you have a device that will automatically join an unknown network, then there is a good chance that device has a setting to turn off that ability. If so, then I would definitely turn it off. It is not a good idea to have a device connect automatically to an unknown network. And if you cannot turn it off, then I would argue that device has a poorly designed implementation of WiFi as it is not a good idea to automatically connect to unknown networks as I said.

Now, of course, all available networks should show up in the list of networks that your device receives a signal from and some might have stronger signals than your network (i.e. maybe a neighbor has a WiFi access point that uses more power for its signal). That, however, is dramatically different than actually connecting to the network.

As to not getting an Internet connection from those networks, they could be "setup" WiFi for some smart device (many "smart devices" put out an "ad hoc" WiFi signal for you to connect directly to the device to then aid in helping that device connect to your WiFi network when setting it up) or someone who is just using WiFi for a local area network that is not connected to the Internet (not too common, but not impossible either).

#8 smax013

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Posted 27 May 2017 - 03:31 PM

Hi,

Just to explain, I have read about people who buy repeaters, et al, to extend their WiFi out onto their porch or wherever and that's why I thought this would be easy at first.

But then I saw where it gets configured with an IP of its own, which prompted my question here before I bought one, which is how laptops/devices connect as you're moving around.

The "porch" example is real, which sounded to me like the guy is taking his laptop out onto the porch when he wants to, so okay, but if the repeater has a different IP, then how can he just walk out to his porch (where he didn't have enough signal befote) with his laptop and just be connected with good signal now, without having to manually connect each time? At least he didn't mention that he was in his product review.

I.e., I don't think the average person buying these just to extend their home network (at least not everyone in the home) knows to "look for and connect to the repeater now, because I'm out on the porch now".

This is what lead to my question of how it is working and to make sure I'll be able to do what it sounds like it's doing, before I bought one, because it has a different IP, so how is that going to happen?


Every network device needs to have its own IP address. This should include a "repeater".

The "repeater's" IP address will have absolutely nothing to do with how you connect to the WiFi signal it puts out. That will purely be a function of how that "repeater" device is designed to work and/or how you have it setup (see below).

If you are using a DHCP that dynamically assigns IP address to devices on the network whether wired or by WiFi (which most home users will be), then you generally don't worry about or deal with IP addresses...unless you have some sort of network problem maybe.

Quick question please: If I do decide to just set up the other Router I have as an AP and split the network (that Router does have an actual "AP Mode"), do I make the SSID the same as it is in the Main Router? Or do I use a different SSID in the AP?

Thank You!!!


If you want the "auto roam" ability, then you will want to use the same SSID on the second router as you do on the first. If you use a different SSID, then you will typically have to manually switch unless your device completely loses the signal from the main router (or at least what it considers completely losing it). If you use the same SSID, then it basically goes back to what I originally said...i.e. it will then depend on how your device chooses which actual access point device it connects to for that SSID. As I said before, some devices are "sticker" than others and might stick with the main router even when it has a much weaker signal than the second router does and thus have a crappy connection. To my knowledge, there is not too much you can do in such a situation other than manually "force it" (i.e. kill WiFi on the device and then turn it back on...it should then connect to the stronger signal). How the WiFi network is setup might change that a little bit, but it is still largely a factor of how the device connecting to the WiFi network works to my knowledge.

Now, the WDS and mesh networks that Wand3r3r suggested as an idea are largely just more sophisticated ways of doing this (as opposed to two WiFi access points connected by ethernet and set to use the same SSID). And they "interconnect" with each other wirelessly as opposed to by ethernet cables. I believe that they can help some with "sticky" devices (especially the mesh networks, I believe), but I am not sure how much.

FWIW, I actually make use of a WDS network myself. I use an Apple Airport Extreme as my main router. I then use an Apple Airport Express as a way to extend my wireless network (my main router is at the back of the house and I have a HUGE masonry chimney in the middle of house that goes almost halfway across the width of the house). I have not gotten around to running an ethernet cable between the two (I would have to do it through the attic...it is on the list of "things to do", but just not yet) so they currently connect by way of WDS as Apple routers support WDS. So, the Express connects to the Extreme by WiFi and then extends the signal. And this process automatically keeps using the same SSID no matter which of the two routers you connect to (this includes my guest network too)...all I do is set the Express to "extend" the network and the SSIDs for the Express are automatically taken care of.

#9 Zeuszoos

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Posted 27 May 2017 - 05:44 PM

Dear Smax013,

> Every WiFi device that I have
> ever used will not automatically
> connect to an "unknown" WiFi SSID
> (i.e. one that the device has never
> connected to before) without some
> sort of input from the user.

Our experiences are quite different then. Mind you, I'm talking about Android as I mentioned and without a configured connection, just turning on the WiFi will cause the device to seek a connection and it will autoconnect to the strongest signal, if that connection is "Open".

Now, since I have always bought Samsung, could it be a brand thing? I don't know, maybe. :-)

My question to you would be if you've ever turned on the WiFi on an Android device with zero networks stored that you've connected to AND an "Open" network where you are. That is the case I'm discussing.

But once I have at some point connected to what I wish to connect to, as I have, I assume that wouldn't be an issue. :-)

Also, just to refresh, I use a Static IP network and so, must configure any connections as such.

So while I assume??? that what you're saying is that with a simple repeater or a Router configured as an AP the IP would be irrelevent if the SSID is the same on both, in my case with a Static IP, that is part of what's configured manually for my connection.

But let me clarify, please... I'm not talking about the IP of the device. I'm talking about the IP I'm telling it to connect TO.

So in other words, using a Static IP network, if the Router is dot-1 and the Repeater is dot-2 (even assuming the same SSID) and in my phone's settings for my network connection I have manually set the Gateway to dot-1, then won't it ignore the Repeater?

See what I mean? I'm not trying to be stubborn or dense. It's just that you're mentioning DHCP and I'm Static.

From what I gathered from your reply, you're saying that in a DHCP network, as long as the SSID in the Main Router and the Repeater are the same, then in my phone I connect to the SSID broadcast and don't worry from then on, it'll grab connection from either one it needs to, no manual switching required.

Is that correct???

But doesn't the game change entirely, even with the same SSID on both, when it's a Static network???

Sorry for being stupid! :-)

Thabk You!

#10 smax013

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Posted 27 May 2017 - 06:14 PM

Dear Smax013,

> Every WiFi device that I have
> ever used will not automatically
> connect to an "unknown" WiFi SSID
> (i.e. one that the device has never
> connected to before) without some
> sort of input from the user.

Our experiences are quite different then. Mind you, I'm talking about Android as I mentioned and without a configured connection, just turning on the WiFi will cause the device to seek a connection and it will autoconnect to the strongest signal, if that connection is "Open".

Now, since I have always bought Samsung, could it be a brand thing? I don't know, maybe. :-)

My question to you would be if you've ever turned on the WiFi on an Android device with zero networks stored that you've connected to AND an "Open" network where you are. That is the case I'm discussing.

But once I have at some point connected to what I wish to connect to, as I have, I assume that wouldn't be an issue. :-)


I will admit that I have not used an Android device in years since my HTC Evo died (and Sprint hassled me about replacing it after paying them for insurance for almost two years) almost 6 years ago. I switched to an iPhone at that time (as Sprint has just gotten the iPhone at that time) and have no used an Android device myself since.

So, my memory of using the Evo is hazy, but I want to say it still did not connect to unknown networks automatically. There may have been a setting in Android to allow that to happen, but if there was on my phone, I would have turned it off.

I would look in the WiFi settings in Android on your phone to see if there a setting to turn it off. If you give me your Android phone model, I might be able to look up a manual to see what I might find.

I can say that iOS devices DO NOT automatically connect to an unknown wireless network. For the device to connect to an unknown wireless network (whether open or not), I have to go to the WiFi settings and select the network for it to connect to. If it is an open network, it will just connect after I select (i.e. tap the name of the network) the network. If it is closed, then it will ask for the password. The closest I can get to automatic is there is a setting to have iOS notify me if there is an available network it is detecting and then ASKS me if I want to connect if memory serves...I don't believe it will just auto connect to an open network if I have this turned but it might...it has been a long time since I had it turned on and I want to say I remember it still asking to join open networks...I have it turned off as those notifications annoy the crap out of me.

Also, just to refresh, I use a Static IP network and so, must configure any connections as such.

So while I assume??? that what you're saying is that with a simple repeater or a Router configured as an AP the IP would be irrelevent if the SSID is the same on both, in my case with a Static IP, that is part of what's configured manually for my connection.

But let me clarify, please... I'm not talking about the IP of the device. I'm talking about the IP I'm telling it to connect TO.

So in other words, using a Static IP network, if the Router is dot-1 and the Repeater is dot-2 (even assuming the same SSID) and in my phone's settings for my network connection I have manually set the Gateway to dot-1, then won't it ignore the Repeater?

See what I mean? I'm not trying to be stubborn or dense. It's just that you're mentioning DHCP and I'm Static.

From what I gathered from your reply, you're saying that in a DHCP network, as long as the SSID in the Main Router and the Repeater are the same, then in my phone I connect to the SSID broadcast and don't worry from then on, it'll grab connection from either one it needs to, no manual switching required.

Is that correct???

But doesn't the game change entirely, even with the same SSID on both, when it's a Static network???

Sorry for being stupid! :-)

Thabk You!


So, since you are using static IPs (if you mentioned that before, I forgot about), you will need to deal with IP addresses, but not when dealing with WiFi connection itself. You would need to deal with it from the aspect of setting up the IP address for the second router. It will need an IP address in order to maintain the connection to the main router, etc.

For the WiFi side of things, to my knowledge, the WiFi connection process effectively handles all the IP stuff without you needing to worry about it. The device is using the SSID to find and establish the WiFi connection, not the IP address of the WiFi access point (at least directly...it likely uses the IP address behind the scenes as part of the WiFi protocol, but not in a way you would need to worry about). In other words, at no point do you need to effectively "tell" the device to connect to an access point at IP address xxx.xxx.xxx.xxx. You just are "telling" the device to connect to WiFi network SSID "xxxx" and then the WiFi protocol behind the scenes deals with all the IP stuff.

So, the point is that you will need to deal with an IP address to get the second router up and running and properly connecting back to the primary router, but then you just setup that second router to use the EXACT same SSID (i.e. if you name your SSID on the main router as "dot", then you use "dot" on the secondary router as well...no "dot-1" and "dot-2" as that will require manual switching) if you want auto switching roaming. The device then connects to the WiFi by way of the "dot" SSID and then the device in combination with the routers will automatically handle switching between the primary and secondary router when connected to the WiFi network...and the IP addresses are handled behind the scenes by the WiFi protocol (your device still needs to have its IP settings set to properly point to the gateway which would be your primary router as well as have its static IP address set since you are not using DHCP...this would be true of the secondary router needing to point to the gateway, aka your primary router).

#11 Wand3r3r

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Posted 28 May 2017 - 11:56 AM

Both mesh and WDS have moved from the commercial to the home retail markets.  FYI

 

https://www.lifewire.com/best-mesh-wi-fi-network-systems-4139748?utm_campaign=Lifewire_Computers&Tablets1_mesh_wifi_network&utm_source=Goo&utm_medium=con&utm_content=4167

 

https://www.amazon.com/s/?ie=UTF8&keywords=wifi+mesh+router&tag=googhydr-20&index=aps&hvadid=185316441021&hvpos=1t1&hvnetw=g&hvrand=4268426525255404601&hvpone=&hvptwo=&hvqmt=b&hvdev=c&hvdvcmdl=&hvlocint=&hvlocphy=9033027&hvtargid=kwd-1793721509&ref=pd_sl_7dnhgrfu5v_b



#12 Zeuszoos

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 03:34 PM

Dear Smax013,

Sorry for the delay!

Please note, CAPS used only for emphasis and NOT shouting.

FYI, when I said "dot-1" and "dot-2", those weren't SSID's, those were IP's. :-)

Please assume Static IP Network.

Designations:

Main Router = "Router"

Access Point/AP (Router that has an actual "AP Mode") = "AP"

Phone/Tablet/Laptop = "Device"

Okay, to make sure I have this right, I set it up as follows (please correct any errors):

ROUTER:
IP = 192.168.1.1
SSID = Rocket
(fill in the rest normally)

AP:
IP = 192.168.1.2
SSID = Rocket

AP - If there are any other settings in AP Mode (Gateway, DNS), should I point them to the Router (192.168.1.1), or just leave them blank if possible?

Now for the (Static IP) Device. I will state what my Android phone (Samsung Note 4) asks for:

IP Address (for itself)
Gateway
DNS 1
DNS 2

So what would I need to fill in to make it work properly, as you described, with it not caring about IP and just auto-switching connections as needed?

Please bear in mind though, that if certain fields are blank, the Device won't let you "Save" the connection/configuration.

If you could (would be so kind as to please) show me, just "network-wise", what's necessary and then I'll see if I can get away with that.

BUT ALSO, list what, if I have to fill in every line listed above on my device I should put into each line, that would be great!!!

With this list of AP information (about any items that the AP may look for) and Device information (just "network required" and then for if I do have to fill in all of the blanks), I should be able to get it going, no problem, because of your help! :-)

FYI, when I originally set up the AP Mode in my Belkin (N600, if memory serves), the instructions said to use a different IP & SSID. I knew something wasn't sitting right with it in my head, but I couldn't put my finger on exactly what.

But now, thanks to you guys, I know exactly and specifically what it is! Having a real long history in cabling and setting up ethernet networks, as a carryover, I am still very "IP Minded", whereas when setting up AP's/Repeaters/Etc., to essentially build a bigger antennae, I need to be "SSID Minded". Now thanks to you guys, it "clicked" as to *why* it was going wrong and I think I need to write a note back to them about the instructions titled;

"Yea, but WiFi devices are often MOVED AROUND, Hello???"

I will wait for your reply! <lol!> :-)

Thanks!!!

#13 smax013

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Posted 02 June 2017 - 03:57 PM

Dear Smax013,

Sorry for the delay!

Please note, CAPS used only for emphasis and NOT shouting.

FYI, when I said "dot-1" and "dot-2", those weren't SSID's, those were IP's. :-)

Please assume Static IP Network.

Designations:

Main Router = "Router"

Access Point/AP (Router that has an actual "AP Mode") = "AP"

Phone/Tablet/Laptop = "Device"

Okay, to make sure I have this right, I set it up as follows (please correct any errors):

ROUTER:
IP = 192.168.1.1
SSID = Rocket
(fill in the rest normally)

AP:
IP = 192.168.1.2
SSID = Rocket

AP - If there are any other settings in AP Mode (Gateway, DNS), should I point them to the Router (192.168.1.1), or just leave them blank if possible?


If using static IPs, then you would need to set the gateway address to point to the main router (i.e. 192.168.1.1) and set an IP address for the secondary router. As to the DNS, sometimes you can leave that blank and it will just use what is set to the DNS for the main router, but if you have to enter in the DNS, then you use the same DNS as what is listed in the setting for the main router.

Now for the (Static IP) Device. I will state what my Android phone (Samsung Note 4) asks for:

IP Address (for itself)
Gateway
DNS 1
DNS 2

So what would I need to fill in to make it work properly, as you described, with it not caring about IP and just auto-switching connections as needed?


It is the same as above. If using static IPs, then you set the IP to what you want (as long as it is not the same as some other device). For the gateway, it is the IP address of the main router (aka 192.168.1.1). And for DNS, either leave blank if possible or set the same as what is set in the main router.

Frankly, the easier way is just to use DHCP. The main reason to use static IPs is if you want to connect to a specific device by using an IP address (i.e. connect from the Android phone to a computer or NAS to play streaming files or access files). If you are not doing that, then you likely would be better off using DHCP. About the only other reason to using static IPs is if you want to port forward through the router some traffic so a server or something similar.

#14 Wand3r3r

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Posted 04 June 2017 - 01:25 PM

DHCP should be enabled on the main router in the range of 192.168.1.50 to 192.168.1.100

This will leave 192.168.1.1-49 free for static assignments.

 

In AP mode the ap should be passing the dhcp requests/answers to connected clients.  It itself should not be a dhcp server.

 

There is no reason to give your phone a static ip.  It will screw you up connecting to other wifi networks.



#15 Zeuszoos

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Posted 09 June 2017 - 06:00 PM

Wand3r3r,

I need to use Static IP at home.

But it's irrelevent to other connections. In Android, you don't use the same connection parameters for every connection and then end up having to change them every time back and forth like Windows.

You set up each connection individually and it saves them all, so that when it detects itself in range of a given connection, it just connects to it. You never have to go into the network setting to change back to DHCP first or anything.

Btw, if anyone wants that "Android" type of setup that takes care of all that for you and can save all of the network settings for you (even incl printers, shares, et al), there's a Free program called; "NetSetMan".

You can save up to 6 network configs, like "Home", "Work", "Open", etc.. Each one has its own Tab and you can either connect manually, or set it to auto-connect and can switch between DHCP & Statip IP setups you've saved without ever opening your Wondows Network Settings again!

It works on all versions of Windows and I don't setup a Windows PC/Laptop without it! :-)




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