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Reset Windows 10 password without using Reset Disk


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#1 RobertWfr

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Posted 26 May 2017 - 02:57 AM

Hello All,

I was just browsing through some articles on how to reset Windows 10 password without using the Reset Disk. It is amazing that there are so many ways to do it, especially if it is a local account, and quite simple to do as well.

 

Now I am wondering why even bother to create a password, and one not easily forgotten but difficult enough for someone to guess. Then store it someplace safe under lock and key.

 

Am I missing something here ? Or are we just being fed an illusion with the sole purpose of generating a profit for Microsoft ?

 

Please, speak your mind, especially if it is to set me straight. I cannot begin to describe the disappointment I felt on reading the articles.

(Just type "How do I reset windows 10 password without using a Reset Disk" in your search engine)

 

Regards to All,

Robert Wfr



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#2 dc3

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Posted 26 May 2017 - 08:52 AM

Microsoft doesn't make any money when you use a password, so you can forget that idea.  Passwords are used to protect your data.  Yes, there are ways to bypass your password, but if this is being done by someone other than yourself or someone you trust the computer will have been stolen and the thief will get around your password or pin and do what they want.  You need to quit worrying about what others are doing with these tools and keep your computer safe.  Microsoft does the best they can to  protect your computer, but you have to do your part as well.  A strong password helps.  If you are taking the computer online you are asking for it if you do not have a good antivirus and firewall.  I would also suggest running scans with programs like Malwarebytes and ADWCleaner occasionally to ensure you haven't picked up something nasty.  If you are still worried about others hacking your computer and stealing you information you could use encryption software which is readily available out there.


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#3 britechguy

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Posted 26 May 2017 - 09:15 AM

dc3 has made a number of good points.

 

There are a lot of folks, though, who question the utility and effectiveness of passwords in general.

 

Physical security - keeping a laptop always in your physical possession or a desktop in a room or office that you control who gets in is a much more effective security measure than a password to log in to a machine.

 

That being said, that only applies to logging in to a computer itself.  You've got to have some way of protecting access to accounts of all types that you access via the internet.  That's probably going to remain a password or PIN for a long time, and most of those don't have the kind of "reset workarounds" that a computer login password does (and not just on Windows, either).

 

Passwords make things more difficult/less convenient as far as accessing data but they've never created a metaphorical fortress for those who are determined to get in to your machine.

 

I work with clients who are blind or visually-impaired, a number of whom want their computer to behave "the old-fashioned way" that when they fire it up it takes them straight to the desktop.  Although I have not found a way to do that entirely without a password, you still have to create it, you can definitely set up Windows 10 so that the user does not have to enter it:       


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

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#4 RobertWfr

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Posted 26 May 2017 - 01:15 PM

Thanks for both your comments.

I do agree that when online we are all seen as fair game by those with malicious intent and that we are responsible for protecting ourselves.

 

As for Microsoft, they do make tons of money by having us believe that their newest OS keeps our computer safe from prying eyes. People buy because they trust Microsoft is not giving them crackerbox security where anyone with a few scribbled notes on a piece of  paper can logon to anybody's computer. After they logon they can take their time cracking into whatever encryption is protecting our files, they probably farm it out piecework.

 

The reason I am upset is because I truly believe that Microsoft can do a much much better job on logon security that they have sold us. Its the front door to my home and I want a good strong lock on the door.



#5 britechguy

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Posted 26 May 2017 - 01:51 PM

No, it's not the lock to the front door to your home (metaphorically).

 

Remote access is off by default.  Windows 10 is far better armored than any prior version of Windows, and third party testers have confirmed this.

 

If someone does not have physical access to your machine there is virtually no chance of them logging in as you.  That doesn't mean that a dedicated hacker won't eventually find a way in if they want one, but most serious hacking is not aimed at random home or small business users.

 

I really don't know what you think they should be doing that they aren't.   If you have physical control over your computer you're doing more than any password could ever do, and if you have a password such that the random passerby can't get access then you're pretty much covered at the "access to my computer by someone who can touch it" goes.

 

And when it comes to passwords they're only as good as their strength.  "Fluffy1" when your first pet was fluffy isn't a strong password. "Fluffy978Beverley1935" when Fluffy was your first pet, 978 Beverley was an address in your past, and 1935 was your mother's birth year is.  As would be "1935BleepingC978" as a portmanteau that could be reused with the something appropriate substituted for "BleepingC" based on website/account/thing you're trying to access via password.  Adding a special character in a standard (to you) position helps a lot, too.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

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#6 Kilroy

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Posted 26 May 2017 - 02:55 PM

Once someone has physical access to your computer all bets are off and they, provided they have the skill and know how, can do anything you can do.

 

Security is a fine line between usability and security.  The most secure computer is powered off, locked in a vault, with no keyboard, mouse, monitor, or network connection.  While it is very secure it is also useless.

 

Passwords are like locks, they keep honest people honest.

 

Setting a password lets you know if someone else accessed your computer.  While they can change the password with physical access, they can't change it back to the password you were using.  Though I'm certain someone could with sufficient time and tools.  My first thought would be to clone the drive, break the clone and then reinstall your original drive.

 

I'm not a fan of passwords and am waiting patiently for them to be replaced.  One possible options is SQRL, the problem is adoption.  I use a password manager, LastPass.  My web passwords, for sites that will accept them, are 25 random characters.  My main machine has a PIN and my media machine just logs in with a limited user account.  You have to decide for yourself how much security you want to deal with.



#7 RobertWfr

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Posted 26 May 2017 - 11:19 PM

We may disagree here but I do see logging on to my computer as opening the front door because once you're in you're free to roam about at will.

 

As far as the password strength goes, it is only a valid argument when you have to know the password to get in. Which comes back the point I am trying to make which is, with physical possession (a point you quite rightly made) one does not need to know the password to logon to any computer that runs on Windows. This is what I find really distressing.

 

To get access to encrypted files you have to crack the encryption password but to logon to the computer containing those files you don't even need the password !!

 

Why Microsoft makes it that way and why it seems to be the accepted norm is what I don't get.



#8 britechguy

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Posted 27 May 2017 - 09:27 AM

RobertWfr wrote, in part:  "Why Microsoft makes it that way and why it seems to be the accepted norm is what I don't get."

 

Because login passwords for PCs (and not just Windows PCs) have one purpose:  Greatly reducing "walk-by" digging around.  They have never been nor been intended as strong security.  They are not, even for other uses, strong security.  They're only really good for making things a bit more difficult for a dedicated thief, and a lot more difficult to impossible for your random passerby who might be feeling nosy.

 

'Twas ever thus.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

      Memory is a crazy woman that hoards rags and throws away food.

                    ~ Austin O'Malley

 

 

 

              

 


#9 RobertWfr

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Posted 27 May 2017 - 10:34 AM

Thanks britechguy for taking the time and patience replying to my posts.

Much appreciated.

Robert






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