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Wired Internet Alternatives


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#1 ry12

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Posted 25 May 2017 - 03:58 PM

Hi,

 

I have a huge problem with wifi internet.
My main router is in the kitchen and my room is not far off (I live in a normal sized flat). I use a repeater in my room to get wired connection to my gaming tower, but the upload and download speed are so terrible.

 

I thought of moving the main router in my room but unfortunately that would be a bit of a problem as I lock my room and my family uses the internet (and I also hate leaving things turned on in my room while I'm away)

 

Isn't there something I can do to use wired internet without losing power?

Thanks 



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#2 smax013

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Posted 25 May 2017 - 04:50 PM

The best option would be to actually run an ethernet wire from where the router is to where the computer is. The hard way of doing this is to run the ethernet cable through walls or under floors or in ceiling. For many, this is not practical or possible. You could pay someone to do this for you, assuming there is no issue with drilling holes, etc in walls, ceilings, and/or floors (might not be allow if a rental). The easier way would be to run the ethernet cable exposed, but then you would have this ugly cable running somewhere visible. This is more practical to do, but may not be desirable for many people. Overall, running an ethernet cable will give you the most reliable connection. How viable this might be can also be "adjusted" by maybe also adjusting the local of the router potentially, but only you really know the layout of your home and where the places the router can realistically be put.

From there, the options are pure wireless for your computer, using a wireless bridge like you are currently doing, or using a set of Powerline adapters.

For Powerline adapters, they can work well or not. Best you can do it try. The key is that the two Powerline adapters need to be operating off circuits that go to the same master breaker/fuse box. They don't need to be on the same circuit.

As for either a pure wireless option or your wireless bridge option, there might be ways to improve what you currently have. To explore that, you would at least need to be more specific as to what you current setup is. What is the make/model of your current router? What the make/model of the "repeater" that you are using? Have you tried a pure WiFi connection on the desktop?

You mentioned that moving the router closer to your computer (i.e. in your room), but that your family uses the Internet. How does your family connect to the Internet? Is it by WiFi? If they only use WiFi, then moving the router would seem like the best option. If that results in weaker connections by WiFi, then that might be able to be addressed. Obviously, if other family members connect by ethernet, then you are effectively just moving the problem. As to you hating leaving things turned on in your room while you are away, if moving the router into your room is the best option, then you might just have to get over that and/or be willing to leave the room unlocked if you are worried about the router overheating or catching fire or some such...or live with a less optimal solution assuming there is no other way to run an ethernet cable to the computer from the router's current location.

#3 ry12

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Posted 27 May 2017 - 05:35 AM

Thanks so much for the help!

Unfortunately leaving the door unlocked is a no-no due to reasons, which is why I'm trying to look for alternatives.

The make of the route is Technicolor and the repeater is a TP Link (currently can't give the models as I'm not at home till Monday)

I think I like the idea of extending the Ethernet, having a long Ethernet cable won't influence internet?

The desktop isn't able to take WiFi, however I used the WiFi on console and it worked fine, however lags and disconnections were very common, even when I got the repeater (with a slight difference)

I could try moving the router closer to my room and use an Ethernet cable.

#4 smax013

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Posted 27 May 2017 - 10:32 AM

I think I like the idea of extending the Ethernet, having a long Ethernet cable won't influence internet?


The limit is about 328 feet per cable if memory serves. Others will likely correct me if my memory turns out to be faulty.

You should be fine with a Cat5e cable or Cat6 cable as long as you are fine with just 1 Gbps max theoretical throughput (which should be fine to 99.999999999999% of "consumer grade" hardware). If you wanted 10 Gbps, then the distance of about 328 feet is cut to about 160 ft with Cat6 cable if memory serves.

#5 toofarnorth

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Posted 30 May 2017 - 02:23 PM

 

The limit is about 328 feet per cable if memory serves. 

You should be fine with a Cat5e cable or Cat6 cable as long as you are fine with just 1 Gbps

 

 

328 feet is the theoretical limit and normally the practical limit is not off by very much :)

If it is just for gaming i recommend Cat5e since it is not as stiff and thick as Cat6 making it easier to install neatly


tfn






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