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Offloading ReadyBoost/Swap to a USB 2.0 Flashdrive


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#1 Cyber_Akuma

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Posted 25 May 2017 - 03:38 AM

I have a fairly old laptop that is very unresponsive. It takes forever to login and to start applications. I have done everything else I can think of, within budget, to try to optimize it:

 

Replaced the 5400RPM drive with a 7200RPM one when the original 5400 drive failed (SSD was just too expensive)

 

Upgraded the RAM to 8GB

 

Disabled most of the appearance effects in windows Performance settings

 

Cleared out junk files

 

Defragmented the harddrive

 

Disabled any non-important or non-essential services/apps from startup.

 

But it's responsiveness is still miserable, and I am pretty sure it's the harddrive (defraggler benchmarked it's random read speed at about 3.2MBps, that's pretty low). I was thinking about using a flashdrive for both readyboost, and to put the swap file on, to see if it would help. Issue is, the system doesn't have USB 3.0 ports AFAIK. Would a USB 2.0 drive even help at all? Especially since, due to the intent being that it would stay plugged into the system, I would need one of those nano-sized ones that are barely the size of the USB port itself so it wouldn't accidentally get off. Aren't those even slower than a normal Flashdrive though? Would using a Nano USB 2.0 flashdrive even give any performance difference at all?

 



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#2 Platypus

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Posted 25 May 2017 - 03:55 AM

Would a USB 2.0 drive even help at all?


Unlikely.

What is the specification of the system? If it simply has a pathetically slow CPU, or the 7200RPM HDD is a slow design or is suffering bad read error rate, readyboost on a slow drive isn't going to help.
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#3 Cyber_Akuma

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Posted 25 May 2017 - 04:05 AM

Its a Toshiba Satellite C655D. It's stock 5400RPM drive was dying and replaced with a HGST 7200RPM drive a few months ago.



#4 buddy215

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Posted 25 May 2017 - 06:38 AM

A 2011 CNET review is very critical of the performance of that computer due mostly to its CPU. Toshiba Satellite C655D review - CNET

 

QUOTE a bit from that review: We've seen these laptops advertised during holiday shopping seasons and in store circulars--they're big, cheap, and they usually feature severely underpowered processors.

The Toshiba Satellite C655D-S5130 is notable because the processor it carries is one of the new AMD Fusion APUs (AMD's term for a combo CPU/GPU), a platform we've previously only seen on 11.6-inch ultraportables such as the HP Pavilion dm1 and the Lenovo ThinkPad x120e. The C-series is Toshiba's ultrabudget line, a generic black-box-type laptop with sometimes-decent specs. Priced at $398, the C655D-S5130 seems at first glance like an intriguing new bargain. And yet it isn't: that AMD processor isn't an E-350 like we saw on those 11-inchers; instead, it's a lower-powered E-240.


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#5 Cyber_Akuma

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Posted 25 May 2017 - 06:41 AM

The CPU in this one is a E-300



#6 JohnC_21

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Posted 25 May 2017 - 06:48 AM

How does the computer run in Safe Mode? The E-300 is a very low-end  CPU. How did the computer run with Windows 7?



#7 Cyber_Akuma

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Posted 25 May 2017 - 07:03 AM

I don't recall how it ran with Win7, it's not primarily my laptop. Haven't tried safe mode yet, but doesn't that usually run even worse?



#8 Platypus

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Posted 25 May 2017 - 07:13 AM

Well that is a pretty slow CPU. I think that's really going to be the crux of the problem.
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#9 JohnC_21

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Posted 25 May 2017 - 07:47 AM

Safe Mode runs with minimal startup and services. It's possible a third party startup or service is conflicting but I would hazard a guess it's your CPU. If the computer runs normally in Safe Mode then do a clean boot and start enabling services and startup items until you find the conflict.

 

Publish a Speccy Report. This would at least tell you what temps your computer is running at.

 

If Safe Mode or Clean Boot does not help and depending on what the computer is used for (browsing and email) look at running a linux distro that does not require a lot of resources. Mint Mate or Mint Xfce would be a good start. You would not need to install it. Boot the DVD and see how it runs as the live version only uses RAM and no hard disk space.

 

For this computer look at version 17.1

 

http://blog.linuxmint.com/?p=2713

 

http://blog.linuxmint.com/?p=2753






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