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End-of-Life Dates for Windows 10 Versions


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#1 ocean77

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Posted 22 May 2017 - 11:09 PM

I just upgraded my wife's computer to Windows 10 and I wasn't even aware there were different versions of Windows 10. Could you please let me know if I should have concern with this article in the link please? Thank you!

 

http://www.thundercloud.net/infoave/new/end-of-life-dates-for-windows-10-versions/



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#2 NickAu

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Posted 22 May 2017 - 11:17 PM

Not long ago I got a warning simmilar to this on my Windows 10 laptop, I hardly ever use Win 10 so its not updated often.

 

Image not my work.

win10.jpg

 

After allowing updates to run everything is fine. I also had no idea a build expires.


Edited by NickAu, 22 May 2017 - 11:17 PM.


#3 britechguy

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Posted 22 May 2017 - 11:51 PM

All of the builds can and will eventually expire.  That's the entire nature of "Windows as a service."

 

There is quite a bit of speculation, and I think it's unfounded, that Microsoft is eventually going to make Windows 10 (or just plain Windows, as I think they'll eventually drop the 10 after a few years since this is "the last version of Windows") a subscription service.   The Windows OS has never been the Microsoft cash cow.  They make plenty from OEMs who install it, but after it's out "in the wild" it's the programs that run on it/under it that are the constant source of cash flow.

 

Unless something is wrong with Windows Update itself on your particular machine there's nothing to be concerned about because Windows Update will always take you to the latest version of Windows 10 as it is rolled out by Microsoft.  Given the nature of these upgrades they don't go out to every Windows 10 machine out there on one day, or even close to it.  Groups of machines are set up as a cohort (don't ask me how, only Microsoft knows) and the upgrades go out to one cohort at a time.  It's been this way all along.  Version 1703 (Creators Update) is still very early in the rollout for the embedded base of Windows 10 machines taken as a whole.  The only machine in my household that's been updated is this one, and it's because I used the update assistant to force the update so that I would know what's coming, as I know I'll have clients calling as it hits their machines later.

 

The original build of Windows 10 has just recently officially expired and been dropped from support (except for a very select set of circumstances).  By the time the fall update comes out I'm expecting that Version 1511 will be very close to its end of support.

 

It's simply expected that a Windows 10 machine that's not part of a managed environment (e.g., Windows 10 Enterprise where the IT department controls the rollout of updates, sometimes significantly after Microsoft has rolled them out) will update itself to the next Version when it becomes available.

 

Any machine that's just been updated to Windows 10 should be running Version 1703 if one used the Media Creation Tool to create the bootable media to install it.  If the media is slightly older it might be Version 1607, but that's not likely.  Hit the Windows Key and immediately type "winver" (sans quotes) and you'll get a window that tells you the version and build number running on your machine.


Edited by britechguy, 22 May 2017 - 11:54 PM.

Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.  Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.

       ~ Mark Twain

 

 

 

              

 


#4 NickAu

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 12:01 AM

 

All of the builds can and will eventually expire.

I have no problem with this, as a Linux user I am used to builds that reach end of life.



#5 x64

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 01:30 AM

I just upgraded my wife's computer to Windows 10 and I wasn't even aware there were different versions of Windows 10. Could you please let me know if I should have concern with this article in the link please? Thank you!

 

http://www.thundercloud.net/infoave/new/end-of-life-dates-for-windows-10-versions/

 

 

Worry? - Probably not.

Hassle / Potential issues? - Possibly.

 

Windows will now receive frequent UPGRADES (significant feature changes) every several months - once or twice a year. This is in addition to the normal monthly UPDATES (bug fixes and Security fixes). 

 

Talking about the upgrades (releases like the "anniversary update", the recent "creators update" etc), Microsoft only support a handful of the older releases - they expect users to upgrade to the latest release at the time of it's public release or within the following few months. As long as you have a valid licence, that will remain valid for these upgrades.

 

The upgrade process is usually automated as part of Windows Updates and if it all goes well is pretty smooth.

 

However the knub of the problem is my qualifier 'if it all goes well'. The upgrades are more related to product installations than updates and do usually contain significant functionality changes. Either visible (new features or changes to existing features) , or behind the scenes (how Windows works inside), and it is the "behind the scenes" changes that might bite users in the err.... in a.... rather tender area.

 

The issues could be just (just?) bugs in the new software or compatibility with other software or hardware that you run. For example before accepting one of these upgrades you should also check whether whatever security products you use are updated for the new release (in my opinion these are the most likely cause of issues given how tightly they have to bind into the operating system).There could also be issues with device driver compatibility (more difficult to check for ahead of time), and although MS have only hinted at it, at some point in the future, MS will probably (likely some years into the future) start dropping support for older hardware.

 

Going back to the software compatibility issue - manufacturers have a relatively short time in which to re-engineer their products - this is only usually necessary for security software or device drivers, that itself means that thy might not be ready for the MS public release, or there may be issues with the changes they are forced to implement.

 

Whilst these issues are bread and butter for experienced technicians to diagnose/repair/work around, I feel for the ordinary users who are forced onto this conveyor belt and either wake up one morning to "Hey, Great!!!! New features" or a malfunctioning system.

 

I'd suggest ticking the box to 'defer feature upgrades' if you want to exercise caution (this defers automatic installation of the upgrades for a few months). NOT manually upgrading ahead of windows update offering the update to you (unless you are able to deal with issues).

 

Also before accepting one of these upgrades, ensure that you are on the latest version/patch of any security software you run, and perform a backup (well you do that frequently anyway don't you - don't you?).

 

x64


Edited by x64, 23 May 2017 - 01:38 AM.


#6 x64

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 02:28 AM

Oh and one other bit of advice - I'd recommend against joining the tinfoil helmet brigade and attempt to modify the behaviour of Windows Update or telemetry components on your PC outside of the options provided by Microsoft through the settings app.

 

I realise that many (myself included) find the changes foisted on us by MS distasteful (in the extreme - it almost hurts to have to type this*) but in this case telemetry is supposedly your friend (as MS are deferring offering the feature upgrades to systems containing components that may have issues with the new upgrade until they have addressed the relevant issues). 

 

x64

 

My comment was intended as best practice advice and acknowledgment of the mental conflict I can imagine it causing for many, but please nobody distract from advice in this thread by turning this thread into a rant. - please leave all of that for the Discussions topic! - penguin luvvers - that includes you! :)


Edited by x64, 23 May 2017 - 02:30 AM.


#7 ocean77

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 04:30 AM

Thank you so much. One more quick question. When Win 10 was offering free upgrade I installed "10" for a few months then went back to my Win 8.1 where I am now. Like your thoughts on whether I should go back to 10 or is it fine to hold to 9.1 for a while?



#8 x64

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 06:50 AM

That's not so easy to advise on. If you're comfortable on 8.1 and it does all that you want, then there is little reason to move for a couple more years. If you are waiting for everone to say that win10 is OK, all problems/doubts/controversy sorted out, then you'd have more success herding cats.

However if you intend to stick with Windows long term, then at some point you are going to need to move to win 10. That would be a matter of picking the time that best suited you.

If you want the functionality you could do it now. Your original upgrade will have created a digital entitlement which will automagically activate your re-upgrade as long as your hardware has not changed too much.

if you are happy with 8.1 and/or have low powered/older hardware, maybe defer until you replace the hardware. Note that replacing the hardware would need a new Win 10 license, but that would probably come with a new computer purchased retail.

x64

#9 saguaro2

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 08:30 AM

'Rebooting every few hours' is not very nice behaviour. (Is that for regular users, or is it just for Insiders with 'beta' builds?) It gives me a couple of concerns that I wasn't too worried about before.

 

1) My place of worship has a Win10 laptop that is never online. Should someone be taking it home for updates every few months? Though I don't think it's ever in use for more than a couple of hours at a time anyway ...

 

2) I have a cheap, two-year-old 8-inch tablet with only 1Gb RAM that won't be eligible for 1703. What will happen to it when 1607 expires? I wouldn't mind too much using it as  a purely offline device -- its main use is showing off photos -- but it will be annoying if it becomes unusable for software reasons. If the end-of-life for 1607 is more than a year out, it's not too bad.



#10 britechguy

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 09:23 AM

@saguaro2:

 

1.  I would suggest that someone be tasked with taking that laptop to a location (most likely their home, but . . .) where they have internet access that has no data caps at least once every couple of months, if not more frequently.  If by "is never online" that the machine is never connected to the internet in it's "in place of worship" location your risk of anything happening with regard to ransomware, etc., is almost nil.  That being said, there are all sorts of patches that get applied over time and the major updates (the latest being Version 1703, Creators Update) should be applied.

 

2.  All that happens when a build expires is the same thing that happens when any Windows (or other) OS reaches its official end of support date.  You will get no more active patches, feature updates, etc.  The machine will remain usable and you should be OK until someone finds a security hole at some point that won't get patched.  End of support is for the OS itself, not things like Windows Defender definition updates, which do keep coming (at least until your version of Windows Defender is no longer supported, and that's unlikely to happen for a very long time).

 

@ocean77:

 

I would suggest that you make the transition to Windows 10 as soon as it's reasonably possible for you.  Windows 10 is the only Windows ecosystem that Microsoft is going to keep supporting over the long term and if you intend to stay with Windows this is where you'll eventually have to go.   It is my observation that it's easier to make these transitions when there are lots of other folks doing the same thing at the same time, because Q&A for virtually any issue you can think of is very active during those periods.  If you're a really late adopter you find yourself a lot more "on your own" and relying on searches for archival material to try to fix your issues, and given how Windows 10 has changed in certain aspects [Cortana settings and the introduction of separate App Settings being two examples] of Windows 10 have changed significantly since the 15XX and 1607 builds with the advent of Version 1703.  It becomes a hard slog if you're trying to play catch-up under those circumstances, or at least that's been both my experience and observation over the years with similar situations.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.  Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.

       ~ Mark Twain

 

 

 

              

 


#11 saguaro2

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 09:41 AM

@saguaro2:

 

1.  I would suggest that someone be tasked with taking that laptop to a location (most likely their home, but . . .) where they have internet access that has no data caps at least once every couple of months, if not more frequently.  If by "is never online" that the machine is never connected to the internet in it's "in place of worship" location your risk of anything happening with regard to ransomware, etc., is almost nil.  That being said, there are all sorts of patches that get applied over time and the major updates (the latest being Version 1703, Creators Update) should be applied.

 

 

Thanks, that's somewhat reassuring. Come to think of it, I don't believe there's any data on there to be ransomed -- it's only used for powerpoint presentations. In principle, it's at slight risk from USB-stick-borne nasties, so we probably should be keeping it up-to-date anyway.



#12 ocean77

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 10:23 PM

I purchased a windows 10 software USB flash drive to upgrade my wife's desktop from Win 7 to 10. is it okay for me to use the same software Flash Drive to upgrade mine?



#13 britechguy

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 10:43 PM

I purchased a windows 10 software USB flash drive to upgrade my wife's desktop from Win 7 to 10. is it okay for me to use the same software Flash Drive to upgrade mine?

 

Sure, if the purchase was very recent and you have purchased a separate license key for your machine.

 

If the USB drive you have is, say, from a year or more ago I'd go to the Windows 10 Download Page and use the Media Creation Tool to get a fresh copy of the latest Windows 10 ISO and overwrite what's on your flash drive.

 

No matter which way you go you will have to have a separate license key for your machine no matter what installation media you use.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1809, Build 17763 

Travel is fatal to prejudice, bigotry, and narrow-mindedness, and many of our people need it sorely on these accounts.  Broad, wholesome, charitable views of men and things cannot be acquired by vegetating in one little corner of the earth all one's lifetime.

       ~ Mark Twain

 

 

 

              

 


#14 x64

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Posted 24 May 2017 - 01:02 AM

......

No matter which way you go you will have to have a separate license key for your machine no matter what installation media you use.

 

 

 

ocean77 stated above that  the laptop in question had  temporarily upgraded during the 'free upgrade' period.

 

In that case there will be a 'digital entitlement' for Windows 10 held on Microsoft's servers which will activate Win10 on that same hardware. In this case no licence key is needed as long as the version of Win 10 (pro or home) matches that originally upgraded to.

 

x64



#15 ocean77

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Posted 24 May 2017 - 01:36 AM

Her laptop had the free upgrade. Like I stated above it is her Desktop that I upgraded from 7 to 10 and that was a roughly 3 months ago. A couple weeks ago her desktop had an issue and it wasn't seeing the Operating System so I had to bring it into the Geek Squad at Best Buy. When I tried to use the Win 10 Flash Drive to reinstall the OS it would not take, but I gave them the Flash Drive and they were able to some who bypass and get it back.

If I use this Flash Drive you say I need a different license key number?






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