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How do I Change Physical/MAC Address for "Wireless Network Connection"?


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#1 samiamuc

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Posted 22 May 2017 - 06:55 PM

I need to change my MAC address. I've found tons of tutorials, but they all only tell how to change the MAC address for the Local Area Connection. This does me no good, though, when I want to access wireless networks. They check the Wireless Network Connection MAC, not the Local Area Connection physical address. I know this because I've changed the Local Area Conenction MAC and confirmed with cmd that it is indeed changed. I also know for sure that the networks I am trying to access uses the Wireless Network Connection MAC/physical address, for which I can find no tutorial for changing. Can I get any help?


Edited by hamluis, 23 May 2017 - 07:04 PM.
Moved from Win 7 to Networking - Hamluis.


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#2 bloopie

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Posted 22 May 2017 - 08:01 PM

Hello, and welcome to BC,

 

If you only have a LAN connection that is wired to your computer (via an ethernet cable), then you will not be able to access a wireless network by any means. You will need a wireless network card to access wireless networks. If you have a wireless network card installed, then you should be able to change the wireless mac address in almost the exact same fashion.

 

Do you have a wireless network card installed on your computer? If not, then you will need to aquire one before accessing wireless networks.

 

Hope that helps! :)

 

bloopie



#3 samiamuc

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Posted 22 May 2017 - 08:33 PM

Hello, and welcome to BC,

 

If you only have a LAN connection that is wired to your computer (via an ethernet cable), then you will not be able to access a wireless network by any means. You will need a wireless network card to access wireless networks. If you have a wireless network card installed, then you should be able to change the wireless mac address in almost the exact same fashion.

 

Do you have a wireless network card installed on your computer? If not, then you will need to aquire one before accessing wireless networks.

 

Hope that helps! :)

 

bloopie

I do not have a LAN and only connect to networks via a wireless network connection. I am unsure if I have a wireless network card, but I'm pretty sure I do since I connect to wireless networks.  I mainly need to know how the change( or spoof) the MAC/physical address for it. 



#4 bloopie

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Posted 22 May 2017 - 08:53 PM

Hello again,

 

I see, thanks...had to check anyway that we're on the same page. :)

 

Please excuse this link (I haven't had the time to create my own set of instructions)...first it mentions W10 for Method 1, but if you're running Windows 7, then scroll down the page to just after the supposed video, and check the instructions for Method 2 (Previous Windows Versions).  Let me know if that does it! :)

 

==========

 

My apologies, if I had the time to write a proper set of instructions I would have done so for you.

 

bloopie

 

EDIT: Fixed link


Edited by bloopie, 22 May 2017 - 08:54 PM.


#5 bloopie

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Posted 22 May 2017 - 09:16 PM

Just FYI, you will not be able to change the mac address to "whatever you want" (at least on Windows machines as far as I know)...try changing only the very first byte to either a 02, 06, 0A, or 0E ...and leave the rest at it was.

 

Sorry...forgot about this stipulation until I looked back into it (I hadn't done this on a Windows machine for quite some time). Linux machines are much easier through the command line to change mac addresses.

 

bloopie



#6 Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

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Posted 25 May 2017 - 03:42 AM

1) Changing the wireless MAC is no different than changing the LAN MAC. Find the "Properties" section of the wireless adapter and look around until you find the place where you manually set your MAC.  I've never found a string of characters that would not be accepted.  This is in response to the person that thought that there might be some restrictions on what alphanumeric characters you can use.  It's hexidecimal, I think.  Like this 3B : 5K : TP, etc...  I think you actually CAN put "anything" in there.

 

2)  I'm curious as to why you want to change your MAC.  I've experimented around a learned a few things about changing the MAC.  First thing I learned is that the MAC is only supposed to be an "internal network only" identifier.  It's not supposed to be shared outside of your internal (home, or business) network.  I've done some research and have found several articles, and forum posts that say that both Java, and Java Script, and maybe ActiveX can be hacked so that a website you visit will force your machine to violate security protocols and deliver your MAC Address to the website running the hacked malware scripts.  One article said this was one method the FBI used (malware) to definitively prove that a particular computer did illegal activity "X".

 

But browser fingerprinting is a much more reliable and easy way to do the exact same thing.

 

https://panopticlick.eff.org/

 

Think of it this way.  If you were on the Jury and the Prosecutor said that the FBI determined there was a 1 in 5 million chance that someone else's computer browser did illegal computer activity "X", would YOU vote for acquittal?  My point here is that they don't need the MAC Address to prove it was you.  All they have to do is get the record of the browser fingerprint, and have the physical computer in their possession (meaning they've seized it), in order to prove that a particular computer did a specific, presumably illegal computer activity (let's say it was credit card fraud on eBay, to keep things as non-controversial as possible).

 

My whole point here is that changing your MAC doesn't really afford you any privacy.  Malware can hack your MAC Address, but nothing (or very little) masks your browser fingerprint.  Except I posted on the Pale Moon Forums once, requesting that the Developers there make what I called a "browser fingerprint rotator" which makes regularly scheduled changes to your browser's fingerprint (every "x" minutes, or every "y" page loads) so that your computer never presents the exact same fingerprint to a website.  A few weeks, months later there was an announced change in Pale Moon, but I never found out if my browser fingerprint rotator idea went anywhere.

 

Point is, again, if you want privacy, you need to worry about malware and hacks, and also browser fingerprints.  I don't think the MAC Address is going to do much for you.  But I could be wrong and that's why I'm posting all this.  Maybe I'm wrong and there is something for me to learn here.

 

Another thought I had was MAC spoofing, which I've thought about, but have never done.  That's where you copy the MAC address of another device and the computer network accepts it (your spoofed device) as being the "original".  My home network has a "whitelist" of MAC Addresses and if the device's MAC Address isn't on the white list, it's not allowed to connect to the network.  I mention this because IMO this is a minimum basic measure of network security that any layperson can learn to do in an hour or so.  Find the "white list" section of your cable modem, router, or whatever, and restrict access to your network to only those devices that have MAC Addresses that are on the white list.  Keeps your neighbors from connecting to your wireless network in order to sniff packets or brute force/dictionary hack your wireless passwords.  Also slows law enforcement down a bit and gives them an extra 10 minutes or so of work to do in case they also would like to join your network.

 

Again my point is that you aren't keeping them out, if that's your intent.  IMO the biggest security hole there is is the false sense of security the uninformed User has.



#7 samiamuc

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 04:19 PM

1) Changing the wireless MAC is no different than changing the LAN MAC. Find the "Properties" section of the wireless adapter and look around until you find the place where you manually set your MAC.  I've never found a string of characters that would not be accepted.  This is in response to the person that thought that there might be some restrictions on what alphanumeric characters you can use.  It's hexidecimal, I think.  Like this 3B : 5K : TP, etc...  I think you actually CAN put "anything" in there.

 

2)  I'm curious as to why you want to change your MAC.  I've experimented around a learned a few things about changing the MAC.  First thing I learned is that the MAC is only supposed to be an "internal network only" identifier.  It's not supposed to be shared outside of your internal (home, or business) network.  I've done some research and have found several articles, and forum posts that say that both Java, and Java Script, and maybe ActiveX can be hacked so that a website you visit will force your machine to violate security protocols and deliver your MAC Address to the website running the hacked malware scripts.  One article said this was one method the FBI used (malware) to definitively prove that a particular computer did illegal activity "X".

 

 

Again my point is that you aren't keeping them out, if that's your intent.  IMO the biggest security hole there is is the false sense of security the uninformed User has.

Actually, it's not for privacy. We don't have wifi at our house but I can access a xfinity hotspot, and xfinity offers wifi passes.  They offer 2 free one-hour passes per month per device, and then you have to pay for passes.  The way that they record whether a device has used its 2 passes yet is through the wireless MAC address.  So all I need to do is be able to change or spoof my MAC every 2 hours and I've got free wifi for life - I just have to figure this out first.



#8 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 15 June 2017 - 05:54 PM

So you are wanting to change your MAC address to get free wifi. this sounds like fraud or even theft to me.

 

From the forum rules -

 

No subject matter will be allowed whose purpose is to defeat existing copyright or security measures. If a user persists and/or the activity is obviously illegal the staff reserves the right to remove such content and/or ban the user. This would also mean encouraging the use or continued use of pirated software is not permitted, and subject to the same consequences.

 

This topic is now closed.

 

Chris Cosgrove






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