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After free upgrade, H.D. failure


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7 replies to this topic

#1 Old_Feller

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 03:17 AM

I chose to accept the free upgrade to Win 10. Shortly thereafter, the hard drive failed. I installed a new HD and installed the original Windows 7 on it, but it's not accepting the key.

 

Was my key changed to Win 10 after the upgrade? What do I need to know? What do I need to do to back to having a legal copy of Windows on this machine?



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#2 Goddess_Bastet

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 05:33 AM

I believe when you accept the free win 10 upgrade the original key is 'converted' to a windows 10 one, you would be able to use it to activate windows 10 again but not windows 7.
To reinstall windows 10 download the media creation tool & run it for 'install win 10 on another computer' then eventually it'll ask for a USB or DVD in order to copy the files for install. Then you can use that to install win 10 after a HD failure or to repair, reinstall or clean install windows 10.

Edited by Goddess_Bastet, 21 May 2017 - 05:36 AM.


#3 Old_Feller

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Posted 22 May 2017 - 08:35 PM

Thank you, Goddess Bastet. 

 

I'll let you know how it goes   :thumbup2:



#4 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 08:32 AM

I believe when you accept the free win 10 upgrade the original key is 'converted' to a windows 10 one, you would be able to use it to activate windows 10 again but not windows 7.
To reinstall windows 10 download the media creation tool & run it for 'install win 10 on another computer' then eventually it'll ask for a USB or DVD in order to copy the files for install. Then you can use that to install win 10 after a HD failure or to repair, reinstall or clean install windows 10.

 

 

My understanding and experience is the exact opposite of this. In fact, me and millions of other people successfully revert back to a previous version of Windows after a successful install of Windows 10. The EULA for Windows does not indicate that you relinquish your rights to install your previous version of Windows, it is your because you paid for it. In fact, me and mnillions of other Windows users have gone back and forth between using the previos version of Windows and Windows 10 as long as it is done on the same machine.


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#5 britechguy

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 09:32 AM

I've posted at length on the licensing issues in the past, quoting Microsoft "chapter and verse."

 

The long and the short of it is that Mr. Bennett is correct.

 

The "trick" here comes in having a Windows 10 license that was created using an earlier version of Windows as its licensing base.  If that's the case you own a legal license to run your earlier version, but not Windows 10 at the same time, or Windows 10, but not your earlier version at the same time.  In other words, it's perfectly legal to run one or the other, but you may not legally dual boot.  If you wish to dual boot then you need to buy another license key for either the earlier version of Windows or for Windows 10 so that each thing you're booting has a separate license key (which is pretty much standard - this free upgrade, which was a first for Microsoft, was the first time where you could have a legally licensed version of a newer version of Windows where that key was generated using an existing license key as its basis.  That's what threw the "monkey wrench" into the mix.)


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

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#6 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 09:43 AM

Exactly. The dual-boot option is legally off the table, but it is actually legal to have a stored "back-up" image of both installations, Windows 10 and your previous version of Windows, as long as they are stored on separate hard drives disconnected from your PC. The Microsoft EULA does allow a user to "revert" back to a previous version, so you might as well revert back to a fully configured version of your previous version.


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#7 Old_Feller

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 04:44 PM

That's exactly what I tried to do. In fact, I used the same media (same iso copy) that I had used when the original Win7 was installed on the HD which later became nonfunctional.  But the key was not accepted. Maybe I just need to retry.



#8 britechguy

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 04:59 PM

That's exactly what I tried to do. In fact, I used the same media (same iso copy) that I had used when the original Win7 was installed on the HD which later became nonfunctional.  But the key was not accepted. Maybe I just need to retry.

 

You may also need to call Microsoft for a key reset.  I have seen occasions where their own licensing checking decides "you can't do that" when you really can.  I think (and it's been a very long time) that I've twice had to contact Microsoft about this either for Windows or MS-Office.  They are (or were) generally quite accommodating on this, as pirates generally don't call saying they're trying to do a reinstall, and with a valid (if blocked) license key for software that's anything but current.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (my website address is in my profile) Windows 10 Home, 64-bit, Version 1709, Build 16299

       

    Here is a test to find out whether your mission in life is complete.  If you’re alive, it isn’t.
             ~ Lauren Bacall
              

 





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