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Dell Desktop Turns on No Beeps Will Not Load


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#1 cberger01

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 08:41 AM

I have a Dell Precision Desktop with Windows 7. It was moved around within our office a few times and after the last move it will not boot up. I get a blue light, the fans go on but I do not hear any beeps and the monitor gets no signal. It has the onboard video card disabled and a PCI Express graphics card installed. I replaced the graphics card and that did not help. Any suggestions would be appreciated. I am not sure if it would be the motherboard or if there are other things I can try first. Thank you. 



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#2 ranchhand_

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Posted 20 May 2017 - 08:05 AM

 

after the last move it will not boot up

The first thing to check is that all cabling is tightly connected, remove & reinstall the memory stick(s), and your video card is correctly inserted and locked into position. Also, make sure that the CPU heatsink & fan are tightly locked down and haven't worked loose. Sometimes things get jiggled around after several moves to new locations. It happens.


Help Requests: If there is no reply after 3 days I remove the thread from my answer list. For further help PM me but no guarantee I will respond.


#3 cberger01

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Posted 24 May 2017 - 10:00 AM

I made sure all the connections are tightly connected, removed/reinstalled memory sticks and video card. Also replaced the battery. The only thing that changed is when I turn it on after about 30 seconds it does 5 quick beeps. The dell power button light is blue, not sure if that is its normal color.

Thank you for your help.



#4 JohnC_21

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Posted 24 May 2017 - 12:35 PM

5 beeps indicates a CMOS battery failure. Replace the battery and reset your BIOS settings afterword.

 

http://www.dell.com/support/article/us/en/04/SLN293445/understanding-beep-codes-on-a-dell-desktop-pc?lang=EN


Edited by JohnC_21, 24 May 2017 - 06:04 PM.


#5 Aaron_Warrior

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Posted 24 May 2017 - 05:52 PM

I made sure all the connections are tightly connected, removed/reinstalled memory sticks and video card. Also replaced the battery. The only thing that changed is when I turn it on after about 30 seconds it does 5 quick beeps. The dell power button light is blue, not sure if that is its normal color.

Thank you for your help.

 

The fact that you "did something", and then something changed is significant.  You may have solved one problem, and then inadvertently created another.  When changing the battery, you follow a procedure to "clear the CMOS".  If you did not do this, then that may be your current problem.

 

As an aside, I would also try going back to the onboard graphics card for troubleshooting purposes. It's possible that the motherboard's PCI slot (whatever slot you are plugging the external card(s) into) may have gone bad.  Yes this can happen.  



#6 cberger01

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Posted 25 May 2017 - 11:16 AM

Thank you for all the help so far. I reset the battery CMOS and am now getting 6 beeps which I see is video card/chip failure. I completely removed the video card and tried using the onboard video and get the same beeps. I tried a new video card and still get the beeps. The video cards I have are all PCI Express and I appreciate the suggestion that the slot may be bad. There are 2 PCI slots available, I was not able to find one of these types in the store, I'm wondering if that may work, or if since the onboard video didn't work either does this point to a motherboard issue. If its worth a shot I will order a PCI video card online.

For further info, my point in getting this computer back up and running is most importantly because I have multiple programs that have licenses installed on this computer and without deactivating them I cannot install them on another computer. If there are any other suggestions on how to get this hard drive to boot up on another computer I would gladly do that but from what I've researched that does not seem like a very easy option. I am able to get the data off but I really need to boot into the hard drive to deactivate the licenses.

 

Thanks again.



#7 JohnC_21

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Posted 25 May 2017 - 12:07 PM

Sometimes a powercycle can help. Remove the power cord. Hold the power button down for 30 seconds. Attach the power cord and boot. Use the onboard video connection. 

 

If you have an identical Dell in the office removing the drive and replacing it with the drive from this computer may get it to boot enough to pull the licenses.



#8 RolandJS

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Posted 25 May 2017 - 12:46 PM

If the aforementioned advice is rejected by the computer, you might have to do...the bench build/test.  Beginning with power supply, motherboard, you being properly "anti-electrostatically" grounded, with beep codes printed out (using another computer), add one item, test, add another item, test... that process just might bring to light a shorted-out piece of hardware or somehow fix the problem.


"Take care of thy backups and thy restores shall take care of thee."  -- Ben Franklin revisited.

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#9 Aaron_Warrior

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Posted 25 May 2017 - 02:03 PM

This feels like motherboard to me.  How old is the computer?  What's the specific model of the Dell System and/or the motherboard.  Research "bad caps".  A very common cause of premature motherboard failure is that manufacturers use low-quality capacitors which fail faster than higher-quality capacitors.

 

I would also spend a lot of time trying to make the system work with onboard video, as the chances that external video card functionality AND on board video going bad, both at the same time, is very low, IMO.   Possible, but less likely.  I'm willing to believe that all your PCI Express slots have all gone bad, but not that AND your onboard video also, all at the same time.

 

Give your motherboard a close inspection.  Use a magnifying glass if you have one, and a flashlight.  Pay particular attention to the capacitors and see if you can detecting any burst caps, swelling, leaking.  Any kind of crud on the seams (it looks like light corrosion) means you have serious, catastrophic problems and you are probably wasting your time trying to fix it.

 

Having said that, I've replaced caps on electronics before.  They cost about $1.50 each and it takes about 5 minutes to desolder and resolder a cap.  I can help with identifying and sourcing parts if you want to go that route, but it's time consuming the first time out.  If all you want is "pro level" repair, and the m/b is broken, throw the thing away and buy another.

 

If you can access the BIOS, find the part where it reports the voltages and temps and post them here.  It's possible that your problem is a bad power supply and that the motherboard is still good.  If you have (for example) 7 VDC on a 12 VDC rail, you could have problems like this.  A new PSU might run $40 to $100, depending on quality and power output.






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