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My Client Bought This Computer Build


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#1 TechSpert

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 07:55 AM

As the title suggests, my client went ahead and bought all of the computer parts listed below.
 
She is going to pay me labor to put all of the parts together and test the system once I am done.
 
Could she have done any better with this build? 
For the record, she is NOT a gamer, but she does do a good amount of graphical and website designing.
Her budget was $1,200 USD or less. She also only wanted Newegg because she has a business account with them.
 
In my opinion... I think it looks good. What do you think?
 
 
CPU Cooler: Noctua - NH-D9L 46.4 CFM CPU Cooler  ($53.85 @ Newegg) 
Motherboard: Gigabyte - GA-AX370-Gaming K3 ATX AM4 Motherboard  ($143.98 @ Newegg) 
Video Card: Sapphire - Radeon RX 560 4GB PULSE Video Card  ($118.98 @ Newegg) 
Case: Corsair - SPEC-02 ATX Mid Tower Case  ($54.99 @ Newegg) 
Other: Noctua NM-AM4 Mounting Kit for Noctua CPU coolers ($7.90)
Total: $1060.14
Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-05-19 08:53 EDT-0400

Edited by TechSpert, 19 May 2017 - 07:58 AM.


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#2 MadmanRB

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 08:30 AM

My only gripe is that she got the 1700X rather than the 1700, she could have saved a bundle as the 1700 performs just as well as the 1700X and the 1700 comes with a rather nice cooler.

In summery she could have saved $88.85 as the AMD Ryzen X designation is not like adding the K into a intel sku.


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#3 Drillingmachine

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 12:05 PM

CPU: Ryzen 1700 is cheaper
CPU Cooler: Noctua is overkill (and too expensive) if not overclocking
Storage: SSD is small and there is no HDD bringing more space
PSU: Also bit overkill and quite expensive

So overall: pretty good.

Edited by Drillingmachine, 19 May 2017 - 12:05 PM.


#4 TechSpert

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 01:09 PM

CPU: Ryzen 1700 is cheaper
CPU Cooler: Noctua is overkill (and too expensive) if not overclocking
Storage: SSD is small and there is no HDD bringing more space
PSU: Also bit overkill and quite expensive

So overall: pretty good.

 

Yea, I know the Ryzen 7 1700 is cheaper, but that is what she selected and bought.

 

The Noctua CPU cooler is perfect for this kind of setup, regardless if she is or is not overclocking.

 

She has a NAD storage device, therefore, she doesn't need any more HDDs or SSDs.

 

The power supply unit will provide sufficient power for all of her external devices including the above mentioned NAD device.

She also wanted an energy efficient PSU, thus she picked out the Gold standard.


Edited by TechSpert, 19 May 2017 - 01:09 PM.


#5 cat1092

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Posted 21 May 2017 - 06:27 AM

CPU: Ryzen 1700 is cheaper
CPU Cooler: Noctua is overkill (and too expensive) if not overclocking
Storage: SSD is small and there is no HDD bringing more space
PSU: Also bit overkill and quite expensive

So overall: pretty good.

 

I happen to have that same PSU in my XPS 8700, although found it on promo on Newegg & also am awaiting a $15 rebate as of this post, making the total price $69.99, replaced the OEM unit because a EVGA GeForce GTX 1060 SSC was recently installed, it's running great. 550W is not a lot of power when it comes down to it, and there's nothing wrong with wanting a Gold rated PSU, this is the most important component of any build. Inferior units, when these goes, often takes other components with these, so best to spend a little more now as insurance for all of the expensive components installed. Both of my main PC's has the prior gen EVGA 'G2' 650W Gold PSU installed, however there's more hardware installed. 

 

Oh, and those random freezes I was once having before the upgrade, are all gone, So there was a good chance that it was my 460W Dell OEM PSU being the culprit. A replacement of the same would cost much more than the EVGA G3 550W PSU, and no way would I consider a used/open box/refurbished unit to protect my hardware. Again, a quality PSU not only powers the PC, also protects components with all sorts of inbuilt technology. 

 

And about the EVGA brand > an acronym for quality! :thumbsup:

 

Also happen to have a higher priced Noctua CPU cooler, the NH-D15, compared to the flimsy Intel cooler with a hollow copper core (which they no longer include with unlocked CPU's), temps dropped by over 30C at full load, no more thermal throttling! The Intel XTU app proved this the first time I ran it with the NH-D15, with the stock cooler, throttle was a constant. Also runs cooler performing much any task, including idling. :)

 

I've built three PC's for myself & quite a few for others, the only component out of any that has given trouble & that was a couple of weeks ago, on my second build, purchased an ASUS optical drive w/out their logo on it, although in a bubble sleeve wrapper bearing the ASUS brand. Now I know why the ASUS name isn't on it, used a total of no more than five times & the spindle began to rattle after a cold start, was thinking it was a HDD, fan (to include that of the PSU), and could find nothing, because it didn't last long enough for me to detect. So I Googled it & found two separate Topics on Tom's Hardware Forum at the top of the list, suggesting to disconnect power from the optical drive. 

 

So being that was simple enough, gave it a shot & the issue was discovered. That's what I got for trying to save $10 at best, when my other that's been the over 50x Customer Choice Trophy Winner with well over 5,700 reviews (can't post link here due to Forum Rules in regards to Newegg & other promo codes), to include my own, has ran happily in about 6-7 different PC's & has been through over at least 4 sleeves of CD/DVD media. We get the quality (or junk) that we pay for,. :)

 

 

 

For the record, she is NOT a gamer, but she does do a good amount of graphical and website designing.

 

I say the system isn't overkill for it's intended usage, in fact would had stuffed all RAM slots to it's max capacity, as well as went with an NVMe SSD for OS, Amazon carries a MyDigitalSSD 240GB M.2 NVMe for $114.99 (only $25 more for 4x the speed & longer warranty/TBW), HDD for storage (probably already has the latter on hand). It's always better to future proof one's self, because tomorrow's needs may well be different from today. :)

 

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