Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

Could You Survive Without Electricity?


  • Please log in to reply
12 replies to this topic

#1 cowsgonemadd3

cowsgonemadd3

    Feed me some spyware!


  • Banned
  • 4,557 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:07:20 PM

Posted 07 September 2006 - 08:52 PM

Well I wanted to ask the question could you survive without power?

If there was no more power made for months and months because of some reason could you survive without it?

Could you get food or water?

Like if we had another natiowide depression like in the thirties and nobody made power or cars or gas could you survive?

I think we are to dependent on everything now days. Poeple used to grow food,can food for bad times and such. They could live without cars because they had none.

As prices rise are we going backwards because people cant pay their bills? Will people have to go without power because they cant afford it and can they survive?

How much do you rely on power?

BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Heretic Monkey

Heretic Monkey

  • Members
  • 1,122 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NCSU
  • Local time:07:20 PM

Posted 08 September 2006 - 12:16 AM

I could probably survive without it, but it'd be a rough first couple of months/years. There are no organic farms within a reasonable distance of us, and we don't have enough land, or the right type, to grow our food ourselves. My mom tried planting a garden, but couldn't grow ANYTHING edible in it.

I would definately NOT want to live without power, but i think i could if i had to.

#3 MaraM

MaraM

  • Members
  • 1,717 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Female
  • Location:British Columbia, Canada
  • Local time:04:20 PM

Posted 08 September 2006 - 12:39 AM

We'd be in dire straights! Eek! No electric heating and even our gas fireplace wouldn't work (has an electric 'switch/igniter') - I might survive but my beloved friend and husband surely wouldn't. And no water - everything is based on electrical pumps around here re the water supply for the entire city area.

I actually think about your question often, CGM, mainly because we live in a high risk earthquake zone and power is vital to survival, at least in the winter months.

As for the food part of it, we'd be fine because I've got extras for emergency supplies (including baby formula - and nope, no babies here but last time an earthquake hit, we were all kept out of our homes for hours and lots of little ones around and no formula or diapers - eek!).

To be honest, I don't think many of us may have the knowledge that our ancestors had in order to survive when they first immigrated to North America - few of us have been raised to grow our own food even if we had the land, etc. Or in reality, even basic 'survival skills'. Scary.
Never let your computer realize you are in a hurry or just typing the last few words of a vital document.

While outer events might make one happy or sad, happiness itself is entirely internal, and at all times completely within one's power.

#4 cowsgonemadd3

cowsgonemadd3

    Feed me some spyware!

  • Topic Starter

  • Banned
  • 4,557 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:07:20 PM

Posted 08 September 2006 - 09:27 AM

Yeah it is scary.

We grow a garden every year but if we REALLY needed it badly we would have to work a little harder with the weeds...ha ha

We grow a lot on the farm. Most of the cows food we grow because if you had to buy it then it would cost a lot more.

We could prob live a while or forever without power. We have ponds all around us with plenty of fish. We have lots of land to farm if needed.

If we needed food and couldnt catch much in our own pond a simple 2 hour walk to the local lake or a 6 hour walk to the really big local lake would do for thousands of people.

Then again many dont know how to fish. Or even make a fire without power....

I have heard the stories from my parents parents of not even 100 years ago when they grew up.

They didnt have soda so they didnt get fat. They worked every day for there food and only bought like ice blocks or sugar and salt. They only bought what they could not grow. The neighbors helped each other.

One would kill a cow everybody would get some because they could not store it.

They would fish. They didnt die because they had no ac or heat in the winter. Now days you turn that dial off 79 or 80 in the winter and your going to freeze.

Walking a few blocks was not hard because you were in shape. You walked everywhere and nobody complained.

Now if you had to walk even 1 mile oh man...you just cant do it.

#5 jgweed

jgweed

  • Members
  • 28,473 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Chicago, Il.
  • Local time:06:20 PM

Posted 08 September 2006 - 01:15 PM

I could survive, but I am not sure I would want to.
John
Whereof one cannot speak, thereof one should be silent.

#6 Mr Alpha

Mr Alpha

  • Members
  • 1,875 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Finland
  • Local time:02:20 AM

Posted 08 September 2006 - 01:24 PM

I could survive, but I am not sure I would want to.
John

My thoughts exactly.
"Anyone who cannot form a community with others, or who does not need to because he is self-sufficient [...] is either a beast or a god." Aristotle
Intel Core 2 Quad | XFX 780i SLI | 8GB Corsair | Gigabyte GeForce 8800GTX | Auzentech X-Fi Prelude| Logitech G15 | Logitech MX Revolution | LG Flatron L2000C | Logitech Z-5500 Digital

#7 Kyle

Kyle

  • Members
  • 330 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Adelaide, SA
  • Local time:09:50 AM

Posted 08 September 2006 - 03:14 PM

Too tell you the truth I don't even want to think about. But I guess I would be able to live without electricity but only reluctantly!

Warm regards,
Kyle :thumbsup:

Regards,
Kyle

#8 boopme

boopme

    To Insanity and Beyond


  • Global Moderator
  • 73,323 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:NJ USA
  • Local time:07:20 PM

Posted 08 September 2006 - 07:39 PM

If there was no more power made for months and months because of some reason could you survive without it?

I could survive,I know how to. Really wouldn't want to go past months and months tho !!

Could you get food or water?

I could hunt,trap,fish and I always plant a garden each year. I camp for a week or two almost every year.

Like if we had another natiowide depression like in the thirties and nobody made power or cars or gas could you survive?


My parents did. I'm sure I can.

I think we are to dependent on everything now days. Poeple used to grow food,can food for bad times and such. They could live without cars because they had none.

You would eventually need these skills again. Remember the Y2K scare.

As prices rise are we going backwards because people cant pay their bills? Will people have to go without power because they cant afford it and can they survive?

If oil went to just $90, we would be wearing sweaters, sleeping with more blankets. The days of adjusting the thermostat so one could continue to sleep with say just a sheet would be gone.

How much do you rely on power?

Totally, We live in a society way too dependant on electricity. I fear more the crowds reaction to this change in their life now,than when my parents went thru it in the 30's. I don't see as much neighborly help. Just the panic I saw pre the Y2K,the northeast power grid outage afew years back. It's bad enough when they predict a couple inches of snow.
How do I get help? Who is helping me?For the time will come when men will not put up with sound doctrine. Instead, to suit their own desires, they will gather around them a great number of teachers to say what their itching ears want to hear....Become a BleepingComputer fan: Facebook

#9 zemoman

zemoman

  • Members
  • 150 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Location:United States, Everett, MA
  • Local time:06:20 PM

Posted 08 September 2006 - 08:28 PM

I think i could live like a week without electricity (i would just need a baterry suplly for my pcs lol) but itf its longer then that COUNT ME OUT! :thumbsup:
ROOTKITS BAD!

#10 Orange Blossom

Orange Blossom

    OBleepin Investigator


  • Moderator
  • 36,959 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Bloomington, IN
  • Local time:07:20 PM

Posted 08 September 2006 - 09:51 PM

Great topic!

Let's see: I would have a LONG walk to town - 10 miles one way, and about 15 to where we buy our peaches, pears and apples to put up for the winter. We don't have fruit trees yet. There is a small community about a mile from us - hopefully it would become a more thriving place so the trips to town would become less necessary.

Hmm. Let's see -- we'd need to build some cisterns for water to water the garden and wash the clothes, and somehow get a handpump driven into the place where the former electric driven well pump was.

Would somehow have to get a couple donkeys and a cart and a wagon. Thinking about doing this anyway. Get some chickens so we would have eggs of our own on hand; this is already planned, but I have to get a job first so we can buy the chicks.

Revert back to weekly full baths - this used to be standard operating procedure. When you have to haul the water by bucket from a well, cistern, stream or whatever, you quickly learn how to use less of it. (Actually right now we do this in a sense as the water line from the meter to the house has a major leak, so we have the water shut off at the meter most of the time. We fill the tub with water and then use buckets to fill the basins to wash hands etc. and flush the necessary). Maybe some solar heated water cisterns could be placed on the roof.

A pitcher and basin was used on a daily basis for face, feet, and hands. Imagine breaking the ice in the water pail every morning in the winter.

We'd have to get a wood stove and oven for use in the winter at least. The fireplace insert just wouldn't work for this.

Good portions of the house would have to be closed off to preserve heat when it's cold. We have a fireplace insert - of course the blower wouldn't work but our little fan would - it runs by the heat produced by the insert.

I already sleep with lots of blankets. Propane is expensive.

I think people in the cities in many ways would have it more difficult because of the lack of space to grow food.

Many "weeds" are actually delicious food: lambsquarters, dandelion greens, chickweed to name a few. These will often produce a crop when nothing else does.

Many things we wouldn't dream of eating would become food: crickets, insect cocoons, yellow jackets, cicadas etc. I actually have a recipe for yellow jacket soup; haven't tried it though.

I'd have to learn how to spin, grow flax and sheep or goats. I'd have to learn how to shear the sheep. I have a spinning wheel and a loom, and I know how to weave. I would have to develop my hand-sewing skills.

The so-called daylight savings time would probably become history. No more going to or from school in the dark. Yipee!

Some major problems today: Almost all the water is polluted; the infrastructure in the United States is designed around cars instead of walking, horses, donkeys, or oxen; heating all households and businesses with wood would create smog issues and also eliminate all the trees in short order; we would have to save seed for gardens and farms - hybrids and genetically modified seed would be disastrous (especially those modified so the seed is sterile and which unfortunately in some cases has gotten into the wild); it is very difficult to find good quality handtools, and I'm not sure if anyone still has the skills of the blacksmith.

I fear if such a situation were to occur, many people would not survive; and given human nature I also fear that there would be massive violence among some people to gain control of limited resources. Also, given human nature, there would be generous sharing of those resources among some people.

An interesting work of fiction that has such a what if is The Incredible Tide by Alexander Key.

Orange Blossom :thumbsup:
Help us help you. If HelpBot replies, you MUST follow step 1 in its reply so we know you need help.

Orange Blossom

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure

SpywareBlaster, WinPatrol Plus, ESET Smart Security, Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware, NoScript Firefox ext., Norton noscript

#11 cowsgonemadd3

cowsgonemadd3

    Feed me some spyware!

  • Topic Starter

  • Banned
  • 4,557 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:07:20 PM

Posted 08 September 2006 - 10:39 PM

Yes but would you have time to get all that stuff with people trying to get what little or those items they have?

If the power did go out the economy as we know it would be gone so no need to run a buisness.

I wouldnt like the thought of the smog. I dont know what they did in the times when all they had to heat was wood. I mean did everybody choke all night?

I think many would die simply because of lack of knowledge. Many people cant even stand to be in the sun any time. How could they work in a garden sun up to sun down if they had to?

It would be hard on me at first even though I have grown up on a farm.

I would not want to be around many people. The people would spread out so they would not have smog issues. Houses werent built so close in the past.

People would have to leave there big house to get in one smaller in the woods.

I doubt we would run out of tree's. They have used them for year and years and years. Yes we use a lot now days but if all you had was a axe and yourself to cut one down just like the water you would use less!!

Besides they have hybrid tree's that grow very fast that people could plant. Wood isnt the only thing that burns. Grass could be used too for fires and it grows faster than tree's but doesnt last as long once set on fire.

I think if something like this happened staying out of the city and from people would be your best bet for survival until panic stopped and people worked together.

People would loot and kill for stuff so being away from people would keep you away from the danger.

If we want to prevent such stuff from happening in the first place we need to get off oil and get on other forms of renewable energy.

Solar wind and wave power could power our whole nation if used. But these big oil companies dont want that to happen. A good backup plan would be to get solar panels on your roof as a investment(since solar cost more than electricity its not cheaper just pays off later. And its good for times when you dont have power.)

Just get enough ways to make the energy you need for your freezer and fridge and maybe some for lighting and cooking.

I think it would be cool if everybody made there own energy. We could drive electric cars that got the energy from your own roof or windmill.

#12 mrs ed

mrs ed

  • Members
  • 96 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Local time:06:20 PM

Posted 08 September 2006 - 10:52 PM

I will but not if the whole world don't have it.
people did it on other times but no now.
I would move to the jungle untill the the rest of the world
destroy it

Edited by mrs ed, 08 September 2006 - 10:56 PM.

av-90996.gif

#13 Orange Blossom

Orange Blossom

    OBleepin Investigator


  • Moderator
  • 36,959 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Location:Bloomington, IN
  • Local time:07:20 PM

Posted 08 September 2006 - 11:42 PM

[quote name='cowsgonemadd3' post='353634' date='Sep 8 2006, 11:39 PM']Yes but would you have time to get all that stuff with people trying to get what little or those items they have?[/quote]
Which is why I'm working on getting them now.
[quote]If the power did go out the economy as we know it would be gone so no need to run a buisness.[/quote]
Actually businesses were run before there was all this fossil energy use, but they were very different kinds of businesses, and things were done by hand: blacksmiths, silversmiths, textile industries, tinkers (these people mended pots and pans among other things), law offices, local stores for trade goods etc. Cottage businesses were also very common.
[quote]I wouldnt like the thought of the smog. I dont know what they did in the times when all they had to heat was wood. I mean did everybody choke all night?[/quote]
For one thing there were far fewer people then, and in cities choking did happen. Have you heard of the expression "London particular?" This is a very thick fog filled with smoke as well. Fog keeps the smoke from rising.
[quote]I think many would die simply because of lack of knowledge. Many people cant even stand to be in the sun any time. How could they work in a garden sun up to sun down if they had to?[/quote]
Work-days were very different. Work early morning in the fields and gardens, and late afternoon into the evenings. Lunch was long and often followed by a break, called a siesta in Spanish.
[quote]I would not want to be around many people. The people would spread out so they would not have smog issues. Houses werent built so close in the past.[/quote]
That depends on where you were. There were cities with houses built very close together; Jericho is an example.
[quote]People would have to leave there big house to get in one smaller in the woods.[/quote]
Certainly smaller ones: many of our "modest" homes would be considered mansions. However, many people didn't live in the woods as there were no woods where they were.

Here are links to a couple sites about a Harran, Turkey which has an ancient history. The little conical houses have tiny windows and are the traditional houses from centuries back. People still live in them. The second site goes from the past to the present, and you can see that there were some huge buildings way back when.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Image:Harran-beehouses.jpg

http://www.galenfrysinger.com/harran_turkey.htm

Other people were nomadic or semi-nomadic. The latter would be in one area for part of the year and another area for another part of the year. The Wa She Shu and the Lakota were both semi-nomadic. The people of Lapland still are in many ways, and I think the Beduoin might be - not sure though.
[quote]I doubt we would run out of tree's. They have used them for year and years and years.[/quote]
Monroe County and Brown County were completely deforested in less than 50 years with people using axes. Most of those trees were simply burned - and not as fuel either. The logs were simply too large to haul anywhere. They were rolled into ditches and burned. They simply wanted to clear the land of trees: they thought this was an improvement. The artist T.C. Steele could see the location of Indiana University from his home in Brown County. There was not a single tree. The Big Woods of Wisconsin was nearly eliminated in the 1800's.
[quote]Besides they have hybrid tree's that grow very fast that people could plant.[/quote]
Fast growing trees produce a softer and weaker wood. This wood isn't as strong for building and doesn't produce as much heat, and it also burns faster.
[quote]Wood isnt the only thing that burns. Grass could be used too for fires and it grows faster than tree's but doesnt last as long once set on fire.[/quote]
Yes, which is why the Ingalls family during the long winter twisted the hay into sticks of sorts, but still they burn much faster than wood. Dung and bone can also be burned, and have been and are used as fuel. You can see a pile of dried cattle dung used for cooking fuel in the second site I posted above.
[quote]Solar wind and wave power could power our whole nation if used. But these big oil companies dont want that to happen. A good backup plan would be to get solar panels on your roof as a investment(since solar cost more than electricity its not cheaper just pays off later. And its good for times when you dont have power.)[/quote]
Unfortunately, solar panels are made from plastic which is made from petroleum, and they don't last forever. How could they be replaced? So are the casings for wires. Light weight wind generators on the roof can produce energy also, but I don't know what materials they are made from or if they could be produced without oil or electricity.
[quote]I think it would be cool if everybody made there own energy. We could drive electric cars that got the energy from your own roof or windmill.[/quote]
How about sail-cars? What about being able to change tires to skies when there's snow so the snow doesn't have to be plowed or shoveled? Of course most tires are made from synthetic rubber which is made from petroleum. Natural rubber is made from trees - and I understand they are threatened.

Orange Blossom :thumbsup:

Edited by Orange Blossom, 08 September 2006 - 11:46 PM.

Help us help you. If HelpBot replies, you MUST follow step 1 in its reply so we know you need help.

Orange Blossom

An ounce of prevention is worth a pound of cure

SpywareBlaster, WinPatrol Plus, ESET Smart Security, Malwarebytes' Anti-Malware, NoScript Firefox ext., Norton noscript




0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users