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Check if my assembly is right?


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#1 john1816

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 05:04 PM

Hello all

 

     I've just finished transferring all my components from my old case to a new computer case (NZXT H440 mid towercase). I have done a lot of research and manual reading to check everything that I had done is correct, as it is my first time building a PC hands on manually. (I've managed to change power supply, ram, graphics card, apply thermal paste to cpu and install heatsink before, but other than all of that I haven't tried the other things yet). I did all of the transfer while wearing an anti-static wrist strap.

 

     I've run into some few mishaps along the way - such as the motherboard screw being stuck with the standoff (had to use pliers and then screw it out) and the USB 3.0 header of the case being stuck with the USB 3.0 header plastic cover in the motherboard as I pulled it out since its cable was bulging too much at the rear side of the case (fortunately, I was careful enough not to bend the USB 3.0 pins. I managed to put back the plastic cover to the motherboard. The USB 3.0 header pins are still in tact). 

 

Before I plug-in the power to the computer and possibly fry something up, I would like to verify some things first:

 

I used the motherboard stand offs that came with the case. The screws that I used that fit into the motherboard are the one shown in the picture

 

r5nOMit.jpg

 

The screw has a flat end and a bulging head. I am not sure if this screw could short the motherboard. 

 

Which is different from this screw (has a circular ring around its head) that I see commonly used in motherboards (and when i tried it, it does not fit into the standoff):

 

4bQQ9wA.jpg

 

Secondly, the case manual mentions little to not detail on how case fans should be connected. The case came installed with fans, I traced their wiring and it all converges at the back panel into a sort of hub like this:

 

GR18NZF.jpg

 

I noticed that one of the fan connectors encircled has an unconnected 3-pin fan connector on its end. I then connected it to a 3-pin fan plug, which is attached to a 4 pin male molex connector. Afterwhich, i connected the 4-pin male connector to my PSU via 4-pin female molex connector provided by my PSU.

 

bC3TooT.jpg

(Encircled in red: 3 pin fan connector and 3 pin fan plug, beside it is the 4 pin molex male connector, connected to the PSU via female molex connector)

 

     Since all of the case fans seemed to be connected to that hub, I have no fan connected to the "SYSFAN" outlets in  my motherboard. As it is my first time to encounter such a feature in a case, I am not too sure if I did the right connection. I probably can't control the speed of those fans as it is connected to the PSU...

 

    I had already double checked the front panel connectors, they are connected correctly according to correct polarity as prescribed by the motherboard manual. HD Audio, USB 2.0, USB 3.0 headers also connected to the motherboard. CPU fan connected. 

 

    Is there anything wrong with the assembly or have I missed anything?


Edited by john1816, 17 May 2017 - 05:12 PM.


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#2 Drillingmachine

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 08:39 AM

Screws should be OK.

Fan controller hub looks like bit strange. It looks like it just passes through fan signals. Somewhat useless if you ask me. If you can use motherboard fan connectors, I suggest you use them.

Parts (other than case) are what?

#3 john1816

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 12:41 PM

Ok i just turned on my assembled computer and all seems to be working well, except for one of the fans at the front case (i'll check tomorrow). 

 

The fan hub at the rear of the case allows multiple fans to be connected to it, up to 10 fans. (So in case if I have more than 3 case fans and would run out of slots to connect them to the motherboard, I could connect it to the fan hub instead and then connect the fan hub to my PSU via molex to psu. 

 

It is similar to this, which can be purchased separately: 

 

 

 

What i am not sure yet is if i can connect the fan hub directly to my motherboard, enabling the system to be able to control the fan speed rather than just running 100% all the time (from my experience, it would wear out the fan overtime and I wouldn't notice if the fan had already broken down. By the time it did, my system would overheat about 10-15 mins after boot, causing itself to shutdown, so I am not sure if running fans always at 100% speed is ok - Basically just running them to breakdown and causing them overheating by the time I notice the problem). 

 

If the fan hub were directly connected instead to the PSU, all my fans connected there would be running at 100%. I don't know the exact total load of the fan hub, and if my motherboard can handle all the total load of all the fans connected to one single sysfan header in the motherboard. How much load can a sysfan header accomodate? 

 

http://www.tomshardware.com/answers/id-2851219/plug-h440-fan-hub.html


Edited by john1816, 18 May 2017 - 12:41 PM.


#4 Drillingmachine

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 01:59 PM

What i am not sure yet is if i can connect the fan hub directly to my motherboard, enabling the system to be able to control the fan speed rather than just running 100% all the time (from my experience, it would wear out the fan overtime and I wouldn't notice if the fan had already broken down. By the time it did, my system would overheat about 10-15 mins after boot, causing itself to shutdown, so I am not sure if running fans always at 100% speed is ok - Basically just running them to breakdown and causing them overheating by the time I notice the problem). 
 
If the fan hub were directly connected instead to the PSU, all my fans connected there would be running at 100%. I don't know the exact total load of the fan hub, and if my motherboard can handle all the total load of all the fans connected to one single sysfan header in the motherboard. How much load can a sysfan header accomodate?


I guess that fan header can handle at least 1A (12W), however I don't recommend connecting that kind of fan hub into motherboard, it's just too risky.

If you want to control fans, then separate fan controller like this is good choice https://www.bitfenix.com/global/en/products/accessories/recon

#5 john1816

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Posted 20 May 2017 - 11:12 AM

Ok thanks for the input :) Yeah, it would be best to just buy those fan controllers instead, i'll try to get one of those. Also turns out all the fans in my case are in working condition. 






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