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What is the best way of connecting two routers reliably?


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#1 777funk

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Posted 16 May 2017 - 08:49 PM

I have a connection from next door (no we're not stealing we live in a hospital owned property and are allowed to use the hospitals network. Here's how I have it connected:

 

Client mode router >>> another router for our LAN.

 

I have the client router set at 192.168.1.1 and DHCP feeding the WAN port on the second router. The second router is 192.168.2.1 and LAN ports feeding our devices including wireless. It is also DHCP.

 

Is this an acceptable (reliable) way to do things)? Seems like we end up having to reset the rig occassionally.

 

 

One thing I didn't mention is that I have a third router as a wireless bridge for my living room computer to router two's wifi. It's set to 192.168.2.2.


Edited by 777funk, 16 May 2017 - 09:04 PM.


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#2 Wand3r3r

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Posted 16 May 2017 - 11:26 PM

router then router then extender is only as strong at the signal from the hospital.  each step down means less bandwidth.



#3 777funk

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 07:43 AM

I'm not having a WIFI reception issue, I'm more asking about the routing and IP configurations.



#4 Wand3r3r

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 10:19 AM

ip addressing is fine.  ideally the extender would connect to the first router not the second.  otherwise no suggestions for improvement.



#5 777funk

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Posted 17 May 2017 - 05:56 PM

There is not really an extender. I'm simply picking up WIFI from the neighboring building with a router setup as a Client (receives the hospital's access point) and that client router feeding our home LAN.



#6 smax013

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 05:13 PM

Does your router connect by way of WiFi or ethernet? Since you mention a connection to the WAN port, I am suspecting the latter.

If so, then it sounds like your setup is resulting in a double NAT. I believe some people will argue that can result in some performance loss, but I believe they are typically gamers who want ever ounce of performance from their Internet connection that they can get. I can say that my setup has a double NAT for my own reasons, but it works fine.

If it is double NAT'd, then you are also "isolated" from the rest of the devices that connect to the hospital property due to the firewall effect of the NAT on your router.

In the end, it really depends on what you goal is when connecting the two routers. Things like where you want devices connecting to the first router to be able to see devices connected to the second router will impact the answer, for example. If you want your devices isolated from the hospital network and you have an ethernet cable connecting your router to the hospital's router, then I would likely say you setup is fine.

#7 777funk

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 05:32 PM

To clarify, I have the following setup:

 

Hospital WIFI >>> Router 1 Set as CLIENT to receive WAN - LAN >>> Router 2 WAN - LAN >>> Home Computers and WIFI Devices



#8 smax013

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 05:47 PM

To clarify, I have the following setup:
 
Hospital WIFI >>> Router 1 Set as CLIENT to receive WAN - LAN >>> Router 2 WAN - LAN >>> Home Computers and WIFI Devices


So, you are using Router 1 as a bridge and then using Router 2 effectively as your router to separate your devices from hospital network. Am I understanding it correctly?

#9 777funk

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Posted 19 May 2017 - 06:33 PM

 

To clarify, I have the following setup:
 
Hospital WIFI >>> Router 1 Set as CLIENT to receive WAN - LAN >>> Router 2 WAN - LAN >>> Home Computers and WIFI Devices


So, you are using Router 1 as a bridge and then using Router 2 effectively as your router to separate your devices from hospital network. Am I understanding it correctly?

 

 

That's right but I don't actually have it in bridge I don't believe, just in client mode as if it were any other receiving WIFI device (I think anyways, new to networking).



#10 doctore

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Posted 20 May 2017 - 09:03 AM

There is nothing wrong with your setup, other than being a bit insecure, since you have "routers" all over the place, i.e. if Router1 is in another room - someone can plug into the LAN ports without your knowledge.

 

For best results, there is no need to have Router1 use DHCP to assign address and DNS to Router2. Make sure that Router1 doesn't use DHCP range spanning the whole subnet, i.e. it doesn't assign addresses from 192.168.1.1-192.168.1.254, maybe just from 192.168.1.50 to 192.168.1.100, or better yet, turn it off if it's not needed on Router1. The on Router2, assign the WAN port 192.168.1.150 and use DNS from OpenDNS - 208.67.222.222 and 208.67.220.220

Do something similar to Router1 if possible - use static IP for the WAN and use the OpenDNS IPs.



#11 smax013

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Posted 23 May 2017 - 12:24 PM

That's right but I don't actually have it in bridge I don't believe, just in client mode as if it were any other receiving WIFI device (I think anyways, new to networking).


So, is the second router running a DHCP and "handing" out IP addresses? If so, then in your mind what is the purpose of the third router?




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