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installing XP and updates on refurbished computer


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#1 hdriscoll

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Posted 15 May 2017 - 05:02 PM

I recently got a Dell OptiPlex 755 (it was free). It needed a HDD and I maxed out the memory. I also installed a floppy drive and the original video card that it cam with but wasn't included.

I have a copy of XP that I'll be installing. With this new ransom ware going around, should I only have the XP computer plugged in to my network while updating it. I see that Microsoft released an update to combat WannaCry.



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#2 Just_One_Question

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Posted 15 May 2017 - 05:08 PM

I don't know about your inquiry, but just a heads up, if you've maxxed out this computer's RAM, that means that you have installed 8GB of memory. If your copy of Windows XP is 32-bit and not the rarer 64-bit, the OS will limit the available used RAM to 4GB.

#3 hamluis

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Posted 15 May 2017 - 05:59 PM

Well..."officially" (nothing I do or say is really "official", it's all "opinion"...I would tell you not to install XP, since I don't see any logical points for installing an unsupported version of Windows that is sorely outdated :).

 

As for my experiences...I still have a triple boot of XP, Win 7, and Win 10 on this system.  I haven't experienced any problems that most will tell you that are inherent in the risk of instaling/using XP today.  My one disconnect is that IE 8 is not acceptable as a browser...so I use Firefox.

 

XP is the O/S I boot into and use the most...of the three on this system.  The sky has not fallen...it's not likely to fall, IMO...with one of the reasons being that XP is no a prime target of anyone interested in creating/disseminating malware...Win 7 is the most used version of Windows today and it should continue to be primary target of those who derive joy from trying to frustrate Windows users with malware/adware and such.

 

Whether the sky falls on my XP install or not...it's the RISK that users should be concerned with when concerned with system vulnerability.  Someone conceivably COULD target XP in some extraordinary manner, even though it's a low-reward target for the malware misanthropes.  I mean...16 or 17 years is a long time...for anyone wanting to do bad things to XP users...I'm sure that was part of Microsoft's thinking in abandoning XP..."it's not worth the time/attention of anyone".

 

If you insist on living "dangerously", as I do...I suggest that you

    a.  Be mentally prepared for everything to go wrong on any day.  That means implementing a backup strategy that involves a clean install or use of a backup at a moment's notice, with no crying on your part.

    b.  Run a tandem of O/Ses, for the sake of familiarity...in preparation for the day/moment when you need to switch to either a linux version or another Windows version.  Do not put yourself where you are running XP because it is the only O/S that you are familiar with...and you are too lazy to familiarize with an alternative.

 

Louis

 

I also have a refurb Optiplex 755, with Win 7 installed on it...it's my backup system for when things go awry with this system with the multiboot.


Edited by hamluis, 15 May 2017 - 06:03 PM.


#4 hdriscoll

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Posted 15 May 2017 - 09:06 PM

I don't know about your inquiry, but just a heads up, if you've maxxed out this computer's RAM, that means that you have installed 8GB of memory. If your copy of Windows XP is 32-bit and not the rarer 64-bit, the OS will limit the available used RAM to 4GB.

Sorry, what I meant to say was that I maxed it out to what the OS is capable of supporting.



#5 hdriscoll

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Posted 15 May 2017 - 09:09 PM

This computer will be used to screw around on and play older PC games. It's not my main machine.


 


Edited by hamluis, 16 May 2017 - 07:10 AM.


#6 BeigeBochs

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 12:04 AM

As long as the other Windows machines on your network are patched against the vulnerability exploited by the WannaCry ransomware, it should be OK to attach the XP system to the network to download and install updates.  Just don't fire up any web browsers on the computer until all updates have been applied.

 

While you're at it, look into applying the POSReady registry tweak to the XP installation so that the system installs automatically additional security updates created after April 2014, including a patch for the vulnerability used by WannaCry.



#7 hdriscoll

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 04:27 AM

As long as the other Windows machines on your network are patched against the vulnerability exploited by the WannaCry ransomware, it should be OK to attach the XP system to the network to download and install updates.  Just don't fire up any web browsers on the computer until all updates have been applied.

 

While you're at it, look into applying the POSReady registry tweak to the XP installation so that the system installs automatically additional security updates created after April 2014, including a patch for the vulnerability used by WannaCry.

Thanks.

 

I need to rip my "computer room" apart to move a desk and build another one for the other computers. The only system that may be online at the time of the XP install is my Windows 7 box (which has the update). I have a Drobo 5N that's always connected to the network. I'm checking now to see if there are any updates for that.






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