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GTX 1050 ti temps hitting 88c after manufacturer maintenance , should I be worr


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#1 TadMonty

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Posted 13 May 2017 - 09:35 PM

Eluktronics Laptop GTX 1050 ti i7 7770hq 240gb SSD

This is a brand new laptop from Eluktronics that I bought and it has already been sent BACK to the company for maintenance due to high CPU temps (90+c) and high GPU temps (85+c).

I was told they redid the thermal paste and cleaned the case out and that the CPU temps were dropped, which they were, they now max out under gaming load at 70c. But the GPU is still running at 80+celcius. I play Playerunknown's Battlegrounds, which uses Unreal 4 as its engine so I know its a tough game to run but the 1050 ti definitely has the power to run it (I know because it runs max settings at 50+ fps) but the temps are high. Even on all lowest settings and in windowed mode I am still getting 83-88c during gaming. I tried Witcher 3 and got about 80c, and BF1 at around 78. Now this is after they relooked it over and this laptop is only about 1.5 months old and they had it for 2 weeks.

Should this laptop be hitting these temps and/or is it even safe for the unit to be getting that hot? I do not want it to burn out of the parts as this cost me a lot of money and needs to last a long time.

The biggest kick of all is that the Eluktronics rep I talked to over the phone, after not getting any update emails back for about 4 days, said that they cleaned it out and redid the paste but that I shouldn't run Battlegrounds due to the laptop getting that hot. Now this was advertised as a gaming/performance PC, advertised with a 1050 ti so it should be able to run this game, and most games, even high end stuff, just fine. I am really disappointed with this company and feel gutted over it. I mainly play Battlegrounds but also others that I do play still hit 80c when playing and that worries me for longevity of the laptop.

Is this okay, or should I be worried? If this is too high, which I feel that it is, I want to push for a refund because this unit cannot do what it was promoted to do. I don't want to be that guy but I don't want to be out 4 digits either.

Thanks all,

Tyler



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#2 britechguy

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Posted 14 May 2017 - 10:44 AM

http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/Core_i7/Intel-Core%20i7%20i7-7700HQ.html

 

http://www.cpu-world.com/Glossary/M/Minimum_Maximum_operating_temperatures.html


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#3 TadMonty

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Posted 14 May 2017 - 11:38 AM

http://www.cpu-world.com/CPUs/Core_i7/Intel-Core%20i7%20i7-7700HQ.html
 
http://www.cpu-world.com/Glossary/M/Minimum_Maximum_operating_temperatures.html


It's a GPU overheat/temp issue, not CPU. CPU is maxing out at 65c under load so that's no issue.

#4 britechguy

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Posted 14 May 2017 - 01:13 PM

The same basic stats are available from the GPU maker:  http://www.geforce.com/hardware/desktop-gpus/geforce-gtx-1050-ti/specifications

 

Things these days run hotter by design, and running 80° on a card that the manufacturer states has a maximum operating temperature of 97° C is not something that would cause me one moment's concern.


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

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#5 TadMonty

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Posted 14 May 2017 - 02:20 PM

The same basic stats are available from the GPU maker:  http://www.geforce.com/hardware/desktop-gpus/geforce-gtx-1050-ti/specifications
 
Things these days run hotter by design, and running 80° on a card that the manufacturer states has a maximum operating temperature of 97° C is not something that would cause me one moment's concern.


I guess if manufacturer says the limit is still above my current that makes me feel somewhat better. Now would a high end gpu run cooler, say a 1060 vs a 1050ti? Or not really in laptops

#6 britechguy

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Posted 14 May 2017 - 02:32 PM

It is really impossible to know whether another high-end GPU would run cooler or not.  So much related to temperature is related to a combination of load on the GPU and the air circulation characteristics of the specific hardware in question.

 

At maximum exertion it sounds like you're running at 9 degrees C below max, which is more than enough.  I don't imagine that you're running at 88 degrees C constantly, either, but I have no way of proving that - it's pure speculation.

 

People become obsessed with temperatures without ever having checked what the manufacturer's specs are and also (though it doesn't seem that this is your case, necessarily) without ever having checked what "typical" is on their machine when things are just gently rolling along through working at their limits to keep up with what they're doing.  There can often be some very wide divergence in temperatures between those end points, and if when under maximum load, particularly for an extended period, you're temperature is maxing out at well below the manufacturer's maximum operating temperature you're still operating "within normal limits."

 

These days most of these units, whether CPUs or GPUs, also have built-in thermal protection so that if they really get above maximum operating temperature for more than a very short period of time they'll start throttling themselves and/or shut down.   If this is happening at any time you know you've got something wrong, but it is probably something that can be rectified and that should be rectified ASAP.

 

If you see what had been your "typical" temperatures creeping up over time the first thing to suspect is dirt decreasing the efficiency of the cooling system.


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#7 cat1092

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 04:42 AM

In addition to what britechguy stated above, which I agree with, notebooks tends to run warmer than a tower PC, for one obvious reason, the lack of airflow space. :)

 

If this were a tower PC, temps would drop big time for most components. Looks like the notebook is geared towards gaming, judging by the quad core CPU itself. Every high performance notebook that I have runs hot, although within specs, otherwise will BSOD to protect itself from damage. If this happens while under warranty, then the OEM should be contacted ASAP for diagnosis & repair.

 

Otherwise, expect higher temps in a notebook versus a tower PC, it's impossible to cram all of these components in a small enclosure & not expect heat. As to the GPU itself, hard to say with 100% certainty, chances are that a higher powered card will be just as warm as a low end one, plus will need a larger power brick for some cards. If by chance your PSU is running very hot much all the time (too hot to comfortably hold), you can contact the OEM & pay extra for one for a larger model. This will ensure you get one that's compatible with your system & will run cooler due to less demand on it, I usually always upgrade this component first, many ships with 90W models that never runs cool, will usually easily find the same OEM's 120W 'optional' model & the notebook has more power when needed, plus the PSU usually is just warm to the touch. Plus the PSU is perhaps the most important component of any computer, be it a tower or SFF PC or notebook, if starved for power, this will produce heat, yet the worst part will be component damage. 

 

While in general, most associates this with desktops, the same principle applies to portables. Everything will be OK as long as the pin is the same, as well as the voltage. Even though the amp will also be rated higher along with wattage, no worries, the system will draw only what it needs, for the same reason, many installs a 3 ton AC unit rather than a 2.5 (or 2) ton model. While the initial cost is more, the larger actually saves energy by not running as hard, which also means less wear & tear. The same would apply to a PSU of a computer of any type, although ventilation cannot be overlooked. If not cleaned regularly, depending on environment, the components will really sizzle & cause BSOD's, which aren't covered under warranty. 

 

Good Luck with your computer, as long as it's running within specs, all should be just fine. Still should consider a higher rated PSU while this company is still in business, or the brand is still being distributed & keep the one you have as an emergency spare. :)

 

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