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Checking internal HD power cable and data cable


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#1 Scott1Roberts

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Posted 12 May 2017 - 08:48 PM

I have a Lenovo Edge E420 and a Toshiba Satellite C660, both of which do not boot as the operating system does not recognise the hard drive, and the Toshiba BIOS does not either.

I presume it is a hard drive failure, but before I replace the hard drive I would like to check the power cable, the data cable and the connections to make sure it is not some small problem that can be easily fixed.

Does anyone have any practical ideas how to do this? The cables are not obviously visible and I'm not sure if taking all the casing off is an easy solution or has some hidden pitfalls.

Cheers



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#2 smax013

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Posted 13 May 2017 - 08:12 AM

Since both appear to be laptops, there will almost definitely not be cables for the data or power connection for the drive. Typically, for a laptop, the drive connections are connectors that are soldered to the motherboard, not cables.

Your best way to check the drives would be to pull the drive from the computer and the connect the drive to another working computer either internally as a secondary drive (typically easiest if a desktop) or externally with either a universal USB drive adapter, external USB drive dock, or an external USB drive enclosure. You then can see if the drive mounts and/or check it in the Disk Management program. If you don't have access to a working computer, then this option is not idea. Also, if you don't have something to connect the drive externally (or access to a desktop to hook up internally), then that would require purchasing something like a universal USB drive adapter, external USB drive dock, or an external USB drive enclosure.

The other option would be to get a live CD Linux version and see if the drives will show up in Linux. Since I have not used this option myself, I cannot offer a live CD version to suggest, but someone else probably will.

#3 Scott1Roberts

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Posted 13 May 2017 - 08:12 PM

Many thanks smax.

This is my first question in this forum and I have to say your answer is very clear and thorough and answered all of my questions. 

Much appreciated.



#4 smax013

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Posted 14 May 2017 - 07:28 PM

Always glad to try to help.




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