Jump to content


 


Register a free account to unlock additional features at BleepingComputer.com
Welcome to BleepingComputer, a free community where people like yourself come together to discuss and learn how to use their computers. Using the site is easy and fun. As a guest, you can browse and view the various discussions in the forums, but can not create a new topic or reply to an existing one unless you are logged in. Other benefits of registering an account are subscribing to topics and forums, creating a blog, and having no ads shown anywhere on the site.


Click here to Register a free account now! or read our Welcome Guide to learn how to use this site.

Photo

It's a question worth asking: Why is the FCC boss being such a jerk?


  • Please log in to reply
9 replies to this topic

#1 JohnC_21

JohnC_21

  • Members
  • 22,660 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:11:16 PM

Posted 07 May 2017 - 12:23 PM

The answer – because net-neutrality slayer Ajit Pai wants to stay in charge. 

 

A sad state of affairs. 

 

Special report This week, Ajit Pai, chairman of America's broadband watchdog, decided to reignite the contentious debate over net neutrality – by proposing scrapping the country's open internet safeguards.

The move was not unexpected. But what was surprising was how FCC chair Pai decided to relay it: rather than outline the logical policy reasons for why such a big change was necessary, he instead embarked on a fact-free, frequently misleading and highly partisan speech that bordered on a rant, even going so far as to mock and dismiss anyone who opposed his idea.

Interest in the decision was significant but rather than talk to any number of telecom policy experts or reporters about the topic, Pai instead decided to give an exclusive interview with Breitbart – the hard-right website masterminded by odious presidential Svengali Steve Bannon. An odd choice.

Pai has been avoiding interviews for months with journalists who cover communications, technology, and policy, only turning up to softball interviews with outlets that he knows will praise him or light TV shows more interested in fashion trends than telecom policy.

Earlier this month, when tech scribe Jon Brodkin complained he had been asking for an interview with Pai for months, Pai responded on Twitter with: "Can't imagine why," alongside screengrabs of the reporter's critical posts about him.

When Pai's not repeating conspiratorial talking points, he accuses individuals of being socialists and lovers of the Venezuelan regime, advocates of net neutrality as being out-and-out liars, and a huge percentage of American citizens as being hypocritical and anti-free speech.

 

Article



BC AdBot (Login to Remove)

 


#2 Just_One_Question

Just_One_Question

  • Members
  • 1,400 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bulgaria
  • Local time:06:16 AM

Posted 07 May 2017 - 12:48 PM

e6iumf5.jpg
To be honest, even though I've read some articles and watched the episode on Net Neutrality on LastWeekTonight, I still don't quite understand what it is all about.:lmao:
Does it mean that currently the government has laws passed that forbid the ISP's from restricting bandwith to certain websites? And now the Trump administration wants to remove those laws and let ISP's decide whether they want to provide access to certain webpages or not?:)

Edited by Just_One_Question, 07 May 2017 - 01:47 PM.


#3 JohnC_21

JohnC_21
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 22,660 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:11:16 PM

Posted 07 May 2017 - 01:30 PM

It's complicated but basically you are correct in net neutrality not allowing ISPs to charge more to companies that use extra bandwidth. Also the rule was shut down that would forbid ISPs from allowing unlimited bandwidth to some customers that subscribed to their streaming services. This was considered non-competitive with smaller ISPs.



#4 Just_One_Question

Just_One_Question

  • Members
  • 1,400 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bulgaria
  • Local time:06:16 AM

Posted 07 May 2017 - 01:49 PM

I see. Thank you for clarifing this issue for me.:)

P.S.My original comment was an English language mess. I fixed it now that I've read it a 2nd time and realized how bad it was, lol.:lmao:

#5 SuperSapien64

SuperSapien64

  • Members
  • 818 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:10:16 PM

Posted 07 May 2017 - 05:54 PM

I found this on the Firefox homepage today: https://advocacy.mozilla.org/en-US/net-neutrality?utm_source=desktop-snippet&utm_medium=snippet&utm_campaign=net-neutrality&utm_term=6582&utm_content=rel&sample_rate=0.01&snippet_name=6582

 



#6 Just_One_Question

Just_One_Question

  • Members
  • 1,400 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bulgaria
  • Local time:06:16 AM

Posted 08 May 2017 - 07:14 AM



#7 JohnC_21

JohnC_21
  • Topic Starter

  • Members
  • 22,660 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:11:16 PM

Posted 08 May 2017 - 10:00 AM

That took down the FCC site. Pai needs to listen to the public instead of doing his own thing backed by big money. 



#8 mjd420nova

mjd420nova

  • Members
  • 1,687 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:08:16 PM

Posted 08 May 2017 - 07:12 PM

The damn politics are interfering with our freedoms.  Big money buys big influence and the public is left with higher taxes and fewer and fewer services.  Corporate execs pull down millions in pay and bonuses and the lower class have to fight for basic services they can afford.  When politics gets involved with legislation, the politicians can't stop taking money from the corporations to basically vote in or out as the money payers dictate.  Corruption is rampant and the taxpayers are getting less and less support while paying higher and higher taxes.  Should any item like cigarettes, booze, gasoline,  even soft drinks show to be a good source, they find a way or reason to add even more taxes. When the voters stop voting for the politicians and vote in the new blood, things MAY change.  Since the advent of the mobile(cell) phone, I have never considered it to be private, not even a landline.  Invasion of privacy is someone coming into your home.  Any expectation of privacy beyond that is highly questionable.  Unless you live in a tent in the outback.  And there's always observation from space.



#9 Just_One_Question

Just_One_Question

  • Members
  • 1,400 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Location:Bulgaria
  • Local time:06:16 AM

Posted 08 May 2017 - 07:25 PM

9cf78b888335f5cd46c25d1be0df5b15_fanclub

#10 techghost

techghost

  • Members
  • 191 posts
  • OFFLINE
  •  
  • Gender:Male
  • Local time:08:16 AM

Posted 11 May 2017 - 01:09 PM

That's a lie. The website going down and fake comments and DDoS stories, all lies. That's how they want to get away with it. This is how they plan to destroy net neutrality. 






0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users