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Is it a good idea to have a Local Account as well as a Microsoft Account on a PC


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#1 sportsfan1

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Posted 07 May 2017 - 06:45 AM

Hi,
I sign into my PC with a Microsoft Account. What happens if something goes wrong and you cant get into the Microsoft Account for some reason meaning that you cant sign into the PC (if account gets hacked or something similar)? Is it also recommended to set up a Local Account in my name on the PC as well just in case of an emergency like this?
Obviously my Microsoft Account has Administrator priveleges. Would I need to set up the Local Account as a Standard or Administrator Account? I wouldn't be using the Local Account at all..it would just be there in case of an emergency so would it be OK to leave both my Microsoft Account and the new Local account set to Adminstrator accounts or is only one account at a time allowed to have Administrator priveleges?



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#2 zainmax

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Posted 07 May 2017 - 08:26 AM

Just in case there already exists the Administrator account, and whether you have a local account or not, it's your decision.
But it seems to me that you are not very clear what is the Administrator account, which is Administrator privilege. I think, You don't know, there is already administrator account for case, if You cannot log in using Your own account.


#3 sportsfan1

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Posted 07 May 2017 - 12:28 PM

 

Just in case there already exists the Administrator account, and whether you have a local account or not, it's your decision.
But it seems to me that you are not very clear what is the Administrator account, which is Administrator privilege. I think, You don't know, there is already administrator account for case, if You cannot log in using Your own account.

 

 

Sorry for the confusion. I sign into my PC with a Microsoft Account. I was only thinking about possibly adding a Local Account as well in my name just in case my Microsoft Account is ever compromised and I cant sign into my PC.

Or is this not really necessary. I have other devices that would get me online so I would be able to get to my Microsoft Account there and hopefully sort out any problems?



#4 zainmax

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Posted 07 May 2017 - 12:51 PM

Unfortunately you cannot give advice, have no experience. I myself do not use it (It means the local account), because I can't see, how it can help.
Microsoft account synchronizes some data, but it didn't mean, that Your login data are not stored in Your computer.

But in order not to regret later, you may make a local account and synchronize your files there. But there is so many better choices to backup important documents or what ever.



#5 Rocky Bennett

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Posted 07 May 2017 - 01:34 PM

I really don't see any benefit in the scenario that you describe. If your Microsoft account ever gets compromised how will that effect your ability to log into your computer? Either way, you will still have to deal with it by calling Microsoft.


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#6 Kilroy

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Posted 08 May 2017 - 01:41 PM

I set up a local administrator account.  Logged into the local administrator account and demoted my Microsoft account to be a standard user.

 

Whether or not is a good idea is personal preference.  However, not running with an administrative account is just good computer security.

 


"Removing admin rights would mitigate 96 percent of critical vulnerabilities affecting Windows operating systems, 91 percent of critical vulnerabilities affecting Microsoft Office and 100 percent of vulnerabilities in Internet Explorer," Avecto said.



#7 cmptrgy

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 08:51 AM

What happens if something goes wrong and you cant get into the Microsoft Account for some reason meaning that you cant sign into the PC.

Good question: I’ve seen that happen more than once at the senior center where I volunteer.

 

On deciding whether to use a local account as a standard user or an administrator

 

Using a local account as a standard user is a good idea.

--- But know that if an issue arises with the Microsoft account in which you cannot sign, the local account as a standard user won’t help you work on the Microsoft account if you can’t sign in.

 

Using a local account as administrator could be helpful because you could run your maintenance or security programs if needed.

 

With all of that said, create system image backups when the computer is running correctly.

--- Include Creating a recovery drive

http://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/4200-recovery-drive-create-windows-10-a.html

--- It isn’t necessary to create a recovery drive every time you create a system image backup but it’s a good idea to create a new one after a major Win10 upgrade such as the upcoming Creators Update.

--- You can use the same USB each time because it gets overwritten with the newer version.



#8 britechguy

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 10:07 AM

OK, now I'll wade in and then afterwards people can test out what I'm saying if they don't believe me.   Microsoft has not helped matters by allowing the use of "Microsoft Account" synonymously between an actual Microsoft Account, which is what you use to log in on Microsoft.com, and a Windows 10 user account that is linked to a specific Microsoft Account.

 

Your Windows 10 user account that is linked to a Microsoft Account is wholly separate from that Microsoft Account.  Since most people set up their first Windows 10 user account using the same e-mail address and password as the actual Microsoft Account to which they're linking this reinforces the false equivalence between the two.

 

Once you have established a Windows 10 user account, and a Microsoft Account to which that Win10 account is linked, you can change the passwords one either one of those accounts without affecting the password on the other.  Your Windows 10 user account password is stored locally on your machine just like it always was while your Microsoft Account password is stored on Microsoft's servers like it always was.

 

Now, if you change the password on your Microsoft Account you will have to re-verify (essentially, recreate the link) the password for the Microsoft Account in the Accounts settings.  The Verify button will reappear when Windows 10 detects that a given Windows 10 user account cannot log in to the Microsoft Account to which it has previously had an established link.   You can test this out by changing the password on your actual Microsoft Account without changing it on your Windows 10 user account.  I can assure you that you will still log in to Windows 10 using whatever password you've been using and will have to use whatever new password you've created for the Microsoft Account to log in on Microsoft's website and enter it in the Verify process.

 

The converse applies as well.  You can change your password on your Windows 10 user account until you're blue in the face but it will have no impact at all on the password for your Microsoft Account.  You also won't have to re-verify because changing your Windows 10 user account password does not break the link between an existing Windows 10 account and the Microsoft Account to which it's linked since the Microsoft Account password has remained unchanged and the Windows 10 user account is still using the correct credentials.

 

Someone could hack your actual Microsoft Account and it has no impact at all on your ability to log in to Windows 10 on your computer.  These two accounts are entirely disjoint entities and it is just a "synchronization linkage" that exists between them.  They are not one and the same.

 

(You can also prove this to yourself by creating a local account and then changing it to a Microsoft-linked account, or the converse, taking what already exists as a Microsoft-linked account and converting it to a local account via the "Sign in with a [local|Microsoft] account instead" link that's available on the "Your Info" pane of the Accounts Settings for a Microsoft-linked or local account, respectively.)


Brian  AKA  Bri the Tech Guy (website in my user profile) - Windows 10 Home, 64-Bit, Version 1803, Build 17134 

     . . . the presumption of innocence, while essential in the legal realm, does not mean the elimination of common sense outside it.  The willing suspension of disbelief has its limits, or should.

    ~ Ruth Marcus,  November 10, 2017, in Washington Post article, Bannon is right: It’s no coincidence The Post broke the Moore story


 

 

 

              

 


#9 sportsfan1

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 12:33 PM

OK, now I'll wade in and then afterwards people can test out what I'm saying if they don't believe me.   Microsoft has not helped matters by allowing the use of "Microsoft Account" synonymously between an actual Microsoft Account, which is what you use to log in on Microsoft.com, and a Windows 10 user account that is linked to a specific Microsoft Account.

 

Your Windows 10 user account that is linked to a Microsoft Account is wholly separate from that Microsoft Account.  Since most people set up their first Windows 10 user account using the same e-mail address and password as the actual Microsoft Account to which they're linking this reinforces the false equivalence between the two.

 

Once you have established a Windows 10 user account, and a Microsoft Account to which that Win10 account is linked, you can change the passwords one either one of those accounts without affecting the password on the other.  Your Windows 10 user account password is stored locally on your machine just like it always was while your Microsoft Account password is stored on Microsoft's servers like it always was.

 

Now, if you change the password on your Microsoft Account you will have to re-verify (essentially, recreate the link) the password for the Microsoft Account in the Accounts settings.  The Verify button will reappear when Windows 10 detects that a given Windows 10 user account cannot log in to the Microsoft Account to which it has previously had an established link.   You can test this out by changing the password on your actual Microsoft Account without changing it on your Windows 10 user account.  I can assure you that you will still log in to Windows 10 using whatever password you've been using and will have to use whatever new password you've created for the Microsoft Account to log in on Microsoft's website and enter it in the Verify process.

 

The converse applies as well.  You can change your password on your Windows 10 user account until you're blue in the face but it will have no impact at all on the password for your Microsoft Account.  You also won't have to re-verify because changing your Windows 10 user account password does not break the link between an existing Windows 10 account and the Microsoft Account to which it's linked since the Microsoft Account password has remained unchanged and the Windows 10 user account is still using the correct credentials.

 

Someone could hack your actual Microsoft Account and it has no impact at all on your ability to log in to Windows 10 on your computer.  These two accounts are entirely disjoint entities and it is just a "synchronization linkage" that exists between them.  They are not one and the same.

 

(You can also prove this to yourself by creating a local account and then changing it to a Microsoft-linked account, or the converse, taking what already exists as a Microsoft-linked account and converting it to a local account via the "Sign in with a [local|Microsoft] account instead" link that's available on the "Your Info" pane of the Accounts Settings for a Microsoft-linked or local account, respectively.)

 

That was a very enlightening read mate..and good to know. I'm going to go down the route of setting up a local account as well as a Microsoft Account so that I can have a separate administrator account from the account I use regularly to sign in and use my PC with. Ive read a lot of reports saying  that has always been good practice.



#10 cmptrgy

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Posted 10 May 2017 - 11:02 AM

britechguy, as usual you have provided a very good description






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