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Help with Vista to Win7: Delete Old Vista Partition


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#1 Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

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Posted 04 May 2017 - 09:14 PM

My neighbor's Vista laptop was infected to the point that the Security Center could not be repaired, but everything else worked, so I partitioned his HD, installed Win7 on the new partition, hand-migrated as much of the data as I could, then ran the Migration Wizard (from Vista), saved the file on the Win7 partition, ran Migration Wizard from Win7 and transferred the settings, etc... to Win7.

 

Everything works.  It's time to delete the old Vista partition and make it one big happy Win7 Hard Drive.  And that's where the problems come in.

 

I'm trying to use Easeus Partition Master to do this and that might be the problem.  There seems to be a problem with getting rid of the 1st, old partition.  It won't let me do it.  The only thing I can think of to do is "Merge", but that scares me because what if I render the HD unbootable and lose the value of all the time I've put into this thing, and lose all the data, too?  So I don't want to try "Merge" unless someone that REALLY knows that they are doing tells me to.  Easeus says the Vista (old) partition is the "D" drive, and is the "System" disk, while the Win7 (new) partition is the "Boot" drive.  I guess.  Both kind of sound the same to me, but whatever.

 

What *I* want to do is simply delete the old partition, and somehow "merge" it into the new.  I just tried to use Paragon Partition Manager and had the same problem.  I know I'm missing something simple here, but I don't want to trial and error in case the "error" is catastrophic.



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#2 Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

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Posted 04 May 2017 - 09:19 PM

Update:

MAJOR catastrophe.  I "did something" with Easeus and now I get "Boot Manager Missing".  What I TRIED to do was shrink the old Vista to as small as I could and merge that space into the new Win7 partition, but now it won't boot.  Running the Win7 Installation Disk, hoping it will give me a tool to fix it.



#3 JohnC_21

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Posted 04 May 2017 - 09:34 PM

I believe what is occurring is your System Partition is the active partition required for booting Vista and Windows 7. For some reason installing WIndows 7 left the active partition in place. If you delete the System Partition you will render the computer unbootable. This is why Easeus refuses to delete your Vista partition. I am not sure what will happen if you merge the partitions. Easeus should be flagging your D partition as active. 

 

Edit: When you boot do you get an option to choose between Vista and Windows 7?


Edited by JohnC_21, 04 May 2017 - 09:36 PM.


#4 Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

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Posted 05 May 2017 - 09:58 AM

I believe what is occurring is your System Partition is the active partition required for booting Vista and Windows 7. For some reason installing WIndows 7 left the active partition in place. If you delete the System Partition you will render the computer unbootable. This is why Easeus refuses to delete your Vista partition. I am not sure what will happen if you merge the partitions. Easeus should be flagging your D partition as active. 

 

Edit: When you boot do you get an option to choose between Vista and Windows 7?

 

I agree with all of this, but now what to do?

 

I installed EasyBCD and so Yes, I can choose, but I set it up so that it ignores the Win7 partition, but it's still there.  I'd like to get rid of it and make the Win7 partition the "System" partition.



#5 JohnC_21

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Posted 05 May 2017 - 10:17 AM

For some reason I didn't see your post #2 when I posted. Boot the Windows 7 install disk and select Repair Computer. Do a Startup Repair. It may take up to three attempts to do the repair. 

 

windows-7-startup-repair-4-580711653df78



#6 Guest_Aaron_Warrior_*

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Posted 07 May 2017 - 12:56 AM

For some reason I didn't see your post #2 when I posted. Boot the Windows 7 install disk and select Repair Computer. Do a Startup Repair. It may take up to three attempts to do the repair. 

 

It was because I did the second post about 3 minutes after the 1st.

 

I already had a close-call with the system not booting and had to use Startup Repair to fix it.  I don't want to take that risk again.  EasyBCD has the system working such that it boots directly to the Win7 Installation and you never even see the Vista, but the Vista is still installed on the HD and I don't want to risk rendering the system non-bootable by deleting the data.  It won't let me delete the partition anyways, so even if I deleted the data I'd still have a vacant and unused partition on the HD.  Plus by deleting the data I might render the system non-bootable again.

 

This can't be the 1st time this has happened to someone. Isn't there a partition software that will simply delete the partition, and make the Win7 partition the new "System" partition?



#7 JohnC_21

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Posted 07 May 2017 - 08:33 AM

You can delete the partition using a bootable partition manager but the computer will be unbootable as you now have deleted the Active Partition of D: With no Active partition the computer cannot boot.

 

To verify if your D partition is active open Disk Management. Your D: System Partition should be marked as Active. EasyBCD has an option to change the Boot drive in it's settings. This may work but I can't guarantee it. It's under the BCD/Backup Repair button of EasyBCD. After changing the boot drive you still may need to do a Startup Repair.






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