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Windows And Microsoft Questions


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#1 Just_One_Question

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Posted 02 May 2017 - 07:13 PM

At this juncture there's no point in going to anything other than Windows 10 if your intent is to remain within the Windows ecosystem into the foreseeable future.

Quick off-topic question about Windows, since you clearly are quite familiar with Windows 10 by now.
I've heard that Windows 10 will be the last Windows version and from now Windows will be a service, and will only get updates, no more upgrades. My question is, wouldn't Microsoft lose a lot of money from non-business Windows users this way, since everyone, once they initially purchase Windows 10, will get updates in perpetuity and will never have to buy another Windows again? Does Microsoft rely mostly on the renewal of the licenses by their business clients when it comes to making profit out of Windows, their main product, or am I missing something/being terribly misinformed, as I feel I am?:)

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#2 smax013

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Posted 02 May 2017 - 08:53 PM

They are assuming that what money they made from selling major Windows upgrades every couple of years will be made up by other means due to loyalty. This might assume more sales of original Windows licenses with new computers, but likely is due to other new revenue streams (such as Windows App Store sales) or more consistent Office revenue due to going to a subscription model with Office 365. At least one new revenue stream is Microsoft computer sales...Microsoft traditionally did not make and sell their own computers, but they do now. In this area, they are kind of following Apple. Apple stopped charging for OS upgrades because their primary business is selling hardware...OS was always just a way to sell more hardware for them.

And keep in mind that not everyone would always update when they released a new version (also true of Office). Thus, the revenue stream from upgrades was likely not as big as you think and it was definitely sporadic due to large time gaps between upgrades.

And there have been speculations here and there that Microsoft might at some point go to a subscription service for Windows too. No real signs of that of which I am aware, but that is always still a possibility.

#3 bwv848

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Posted 02 May 2017 - 09:58 PM

 My question is, wouldn't Microsoft lose a lot of money from non-business Windows users this way, since everyone, once they initially purchase Windows 10, will get updates in perpetuity and will never have to buy another Windows again?

As far as I know, every Windows product has a lifecycle — Windows 10 does not come with life-time updates. Currently, Windows 10's end of mainstream support's date is October 13, 2020, while its end of extended support date is scheduled for October 14, 2025.


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#4 Just_One_Question

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Posted 03 May 2017 - 06:18 AM

I see. Real risk play on the part of Microsoft. We'll see if it pays off. Thanks everyone!:)

BTW, how the hell did a comment of mine got spun off in a whole topic without me doing anything unusual?:lmao: My guess is that a moderator decided to do it, so as not to cause confusion in the original topic.

#5 smax013

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Posted 03 May 2017 - 07:53 PM

My question is, wouldn't Microsoft lose a lot of money from non-business Windows users this way, since everyone, once they initially purchase Windows 10, will get updates in perpetuity and will never have to buy another Windows again?

As far as I know, every Windows product has a lifecycle — Windows 10 does not come with life-time updates. Currently, Windows 10's end of mainstream support's date is October 13, 2020, while its end of extended support date is scheduled for October 14, 2025.


I think that part of the issue is that Microsoft has at least implied, if not stated, that they were switching to shorter "upgrade" cycle (approximately yearly) along the lines of what Apple does for their OS. So, the implication is that they will not necessarily be a Windows 11 that is sold as new major upgrade at some point in the near future that also gets a new life cycle. It is not completely clear to me if this is really true and even if it was, there is nothing that prevents Microsoft from changing tunes in the future.

FWIW, I am huge fan of Apple's 1 year OS upgrade cycle. I personally believe it has resulted in quality control issues, which is a big reason why I wait quite a bit before upgrading. I also think can mess with productivity, especially in enterprise/business environments. New features tend to mess with existing work flows. Fortunately, for the most part, many of the new features in new versions of the macOS are what I would consider "fluff" features, so many of the new versions have not been overly disruptive to work flow. I also think that it has diverted resources from other areas that could use some of those resources (i.e. Apple would have been better served putting some of those resources into more frequent updates of the Mac hardware, especially desktops, rather than yearly macOS upgrades, IMHO). I would personally be fine if Apple dropped to a 2 or 3 year major upgrade cycle for the OS.

So, if Microsoft is following the same path that Apple has done, then I personally am not a huge fan of that.




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