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Recording audio from turntable on to laptop


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10 replies to this topic

#1 Dacar92

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Posted 02 May 2017 - 10:45 AM

I am starting to record my records to the computer using Audacity. I only have a laptop with no sound card now. So I need to use the USB interface into the computer. I have two issues I need to ask you guys about:

1. I want to hear what I am recording through the computer speakers. I cannot find a way to do this in Audacity. I am getting noise on the meters but I'm not sure what it is since I can't hear it.  Any ideas?

2. I am hooking up my turntable directly into the computer USB since there's no sound card.  Do I need an amp?  like this?
https://www.amazon.com/Yeeco-Bluetooth-Amplifier-Receiver-Headphone/dp/B018ZBUQUO/ref=sr_1_102?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1493739725&sr=1-102&keywords=headphone+amplifier

 

I need something that outputs the signal from the turntable via composite audio, amplifies it and then to a USB into the computer. I have cable adapters for the input and output sides for this one. My budget is under $50.

Audacity recognized my Hauppauge video device for audio only, so I think it will recognize my turntable with an amp. I could use the Hauppauge but I may not get the best sound. Plus I cannot hear the music through the computer speakers. Not sure if that is Hauppauge related or not.

 

Thanks for suggestions and help in advance.

 

 


Edited by Dacar92, 02 May 2017 - 10:47 AM.

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#2 hamluis

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Posted 02 May 2017 - 11:58 AM

I don't use Audacity...I still find that Cool Edit 2K does the job for me.

 

Worth A Look.

 

Louis



#3 nickos

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Posted 02 May 2017 - 12:12 PM

dear  hamluis you came first....

 

i would recommend cool edit pro 

 

negative, you need any amp that support ''phono'  like this (the only cheap phono amp i could found)

 

https://www.amazon.com/Technolink-TC-400GL-Version-Universal-Voltage/dp/B06XKF42YW/ref=sr_1_11?s=electronics&ie=UTF8&qid=1493745013&sr=1-11&keywords=usb+riaa+amp

 

furthermore you need a usb sound card if you need to monitor what you record

 

https://www.amazon.com/s/ref=nb_sb_noss?url=search-alias%3Delectronics&field-keywords=Usb+sound+ard

 

good luck


Edited by nickos, 02 May 2017 - 12:13 PM.


#4 Dacar92

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Posted 09 May 2017 - 07:13 PM

I bought a audio analog to digital converter.  Hopefully it is less noisy than the video converter I have.  There's a hiss noise similar to what a cassette tape sounds like.  

 

If I buy a phono pre-amp will it clean up some of that noise?  

 

Since the one linked to above has RCA jacks in and out I have to place it before the converter.  The converter has analog in and USB out.  That's ok right?  I don'w want to blow my converter or the USB port.


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#5 smax013

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Posted 18 May 2017 - 03:03 PM

Do you have the turntable hooked to a stereo system/amplifier (i.e. for normal use/listening)? If so, then run an output from the stereo system and you will have you pre-amp aspect taken care of. And if you just want to hear the audio playing for the purposes of when to hit "stop" at the end of a stop (if saving songs as individual files) or hear other general issues, then you can turn up the volume on the stereo system.

#6 nickos

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Posted 06 August 2017 - 02:44 AM

in order to clean the noises from vinyl records eg. rumble and clicks you need software since a phono pre amplifier does not support that

 

a good audio editor like cool edit have some programs for audio restoration

 

an analog to digital converter can be used to record from your turntable unless your converter have a phono pre amplifier



#7 Chris Cosgrove

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Posted 06 August 2017 - 06:19 PM

 

an analog to digital converter can be used to record from your turntable unless your converter have a phono pre amplifier

 

No disrespect to Nickos but I think something went wrong with the translation in this sentence.

 

You do need a pre-amp. Audio on vinyl is heavily adjusted before recording to boost the treble and reduce the bass and the purpose of the pre-amp is to correct these distortions. This modification to the signal is known as the RIAA curve. Any analogue - digital converter will record an uncorrected signal, but it will sound awful which is why you need a pre-amp.

 

Chris Cosgrove



#8 Platypus

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Posted 06 August 2017 - 10:22 PM

I think something went wrong with the translation in this sentence.


Yes, I think there's a "not" gone missing and it was meant to say "can not be used to record from your turntable unless your converter have a phono pre amplifier"

It's possible to record the uncompensated audio direct to digital and do the RIAA correction in software (which could work well providing you don't believe DSP processing degrades the sound). But you'd also have the hurdle of the impedance matching for the magnetic cartridge, which a DAC would not readily do, particularly for the common moving magnet cartridge.

In theory, being able to digitally record the cartridge output directly without a preamp adding noise or distortion, then doing all the processing in the digital domain should yield the most accurate representation of the sound.

Edit: just to add in, Audacity does have available a library of EQ curves to suit numerous pre-RIAA recording compensation curves:

http://wiki.audacityteam.org/wiki/78rpm_playback_curves

If someone is extensively transcribing old 78s they can record using an uncompensated (flat frequency response) preamp, and post process using the appropriate frequency response compensation curve to get the most accurate representation of the original sound. In principle, the same procedure could be done for post-RIAA recordings.

Edited by Platypus, 07 August 2017 - 12:14 AM.

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#9 nickos

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Posted 12 August 2017 - 04:26 AM

good morning to all

 

the analog to digital converter ''ad converter'' is to convert the analog signal to digital mainly from line sources (mixer output, cassette player, cd player, dvd player) but an analog to digital converter cannot be used with a turntable

 

turntable need a pre-amplifier (riaa) 

 

riaa pre-amplifier have any integrated amplifier or receiver (phono in) or a dj mainly mixers (phono in)

 

so an analog to digital converter have nothing to do with the turntable

 

now if you want to record from your turntable through your pc you will need a dj mixer or an riaa pre-amplifier that have to be connected through your pc's soundcard inputs (rca to 3.5mm stereo jack)

 

there is a way to use an analog to digital converter to digitally transfer your vinyls but you need again an riaa pre-amplifier or a dj mixer

 

turnatble to riaa pre-amplifier via rca jacks

riaa pre-amplifier or dj mixer left and right outputs to a/d converter inputs

a/d converter's optical out or digital out to your pc's optical or digital input

 

any audio editor can be used to record and edit your vinyls

 

there many vst plugins that can restore your vinyl sound (rumble removing, click removing)

 

simply search for vinyl recording through pc

 

i forgot to mention that my friend platipus have right with all that he wrote but is not that easy to record ''properly''  the turntable's signal without the riaa pre-amplifier and without knwing what is the riaa...

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/RIAA_equalization

 

riaa pre-amplifier do all that hard job so it is much easier to transfer the vinyls through an riaa pre-amplifier

 

good luck my friend


Edited by nickos, 12 August 2017 - 04:37 AM.


#10 dziabong

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Posted 31 August 2017 - 03:07 PM

Coming back to software I'd recommend Reaper (https://www.reaper.fm/download.php). It's proffessional DAW with 60 days free trial. After that time they do not block any functionality. They just keep informing you that further free usage is just not fair (which is certainly true, especially considering the price - 60$ for non-commercial usage).

#11 Platypus

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Posted 31 August 2017 - 06:05 PM

I agree, it might be overkill for a basic task like transcribing records to digital format, but if any of the features and capabilities of a Digital Audio Workstation would be an advantage for the particular task in hand, Reaper would be a very good one to try.


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