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1920x1080 17.3" screen vs 3000x2000 13.5"


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#1 Cynthia Moore

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Posted 30 April 2017 - 01:09 AM

I am debating whether to get a ThinkPad P70 or a Microsoft Surface Book. One issue is the screen.

The P70 describes the screen as "17.3 FHD (1920x1080) IPS with a Nbidia Quadro M3000M 4GB graphic card.

The Surface Book describes the screen as "13.5 PixelSense 3000x2000 with Nvidia GeForce (2GB GDDR5) graphics card.

How do I compare these two screens? It looks like the Surface Book is 4: smaller, but higher resolution. Is there any was to compare them?


I wasn't sure whether to post this here or in Internal Hardware, but there seemed to be more screen posts here. I hope that's OK.


Edited by hamluis, 02 May 2017 - 03:12 PM.
Moved from External Hardware to Buying New - Hamluis.

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#2 Cynthia Moore

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Posted 30 April 2017 - 09:38 AM

if you just ignore the resolution and focus on the screen size certainly the 17.3 inches screen is much bigger than the 13.5 screen
 
resolution... the 135 scree have a much better resolution but again the 17.3 screen have a quadro graphics which is a much better option..

How would you rate the two graphics cards on a 0-10 scale?
 

if you do 3d, animation, video edit and rendering or any civil engineering statics then the thinkpad p70 with the xeon cpu is the ultimate solution otherwise buy something cheaper

I have no plans for any 3d or animation and I don't play games. The only graphics editing is very simple.
 

if you still want a good laptop even for heavy professional use go for the dell business series and you gonna regret it...

Are you saying that the Surface Book cannot handle "heavy professional" use? How do you define "heavy professional"? Most of my work is Word and Excel. I do some database work with Access and some flowcharting with Visio.

Thanks

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#3 britechguy

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Posted 30 April 2017 - 01:05 PM

Cynthia,

 

          None of what you describe as doing on a routine basis constitutes "heavy professional" use from a graphics standpoint, and I believe that's what nickos was referring to.

 

          If you're someone (and I'm one) whose main purposes for using a computer are office suite programs and web browsing then virtually any machine you can name these days, from the lowest priced netbook on up, is capable of handling that kind of work.


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#4 Just_One_Question

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Posted 30 April 2017 - 03:12 PM

If you're someone (and I'm one) whose main purposes for using a computer are office suite programs and web browsing then virtually any machine you can name these days, from the lowest priced netbook on up, is capable of handling that kind of work.


Forget 'these days'. I actually made a whole topic that for non-professional word processing you don't need a more modern PC than a 1999 one...:lmao:

#5 smax013

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Posted 01 May 2017 - 01:12 PM

I am debating whether to get a ThinkPad P70 or a Microsoft Surface Book. One issue is the screen.

The P70 describes the screen as "17.3 FHD (1920x1080) IPS with a Nbidia Quadro M3000M 4GB graphic card.

The Surface Book describes the screen as "13.5 PixelSense 3000x2000 with Nvidia GeForce (2GB GDDR5) graphics card.

How do I compare these two screens? It looks like the Surface Book is 4: smaller, but higher resolution. Is there any was to compare them?


I wasn't sure whether to post this here or in Internal Hardware, but there seemed to be more screen posts here. I hope that's OK.


Higher resolution can effectively be used one of two ways: 1) to increase the "screen real estate"...i.e. allow you to have more "stuff" appear on the screen...another way to think of it is that the pixels nominally stay the same size, but there are more of them in both directions so the screen gets "bigger"; or 2) make the image of the screen appear sharper with the same screen real estate...another way to this of this is that the pixel now get smaller in size but the dimension of the computer's desktop stays the same...so you get more pixel per effective "inch" of screen real estate.

I suspect the Surface Book does the latter by default (doing the former would result in teeny, tiny icons and unreadable text on a 13" screen without using text scaling), but I have not specifically researched it. I know that this is what the "Retina" display on my MacBook Pro does by default. I can switch it into a mode where there is more screen real estate, but this has the effect of also making all the icons and text smaller.

#6 Kilroy

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Posted 01 May 2017 - 02:37 PM

Cynthia Moore what you want to do on the computer is the main thing.  The nVidia Quadro line is normally used for CAD machines.  The nVidia GeForce series is a consumer card that is good for gaming.  If you're doing CAD the Quadro will serve you better and if you're doing gaming the GeForce will serve you better.  This is really an apples and oranges type of comparison, each card is good for what it was designed to do.

 

For basic editing the GeForce card should work just fine for you and the Quadro card may not perform as well.

 

Remember that a higher resolution makes things smaller, not larger.  My home set up is three 27" 1920x1080 monitors.  Even with that I have my web browsers zoomed to 125%.

 

There is probably also a weight difference with the screen sizes.  I'd guess that the 17" screen laptop is probably at least two pounds more than the 13".  How often will you be carrying the machine around?



#7 smax013

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Posted 01 May 2017 - 10:39 PM

I'd guess that the 17" screen laptop is probably at least two pounds more than the 13".


Actually, about 3 to 4 pounds heavier. Surface Book is about 3.5 lbs, while the P70 is about 7 lbs...at least according to each companies' website.

#8 Cynthia Moore

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Posted 01 May 2017 - 11:54 PM

Cynthia Moore what you want to do on the computer is the main thing.  The nVidia Quadro line is normally used for CAD machines.  The nVidia GeForce series is a consumer card that is good for gaming.  If you're doing CAD the Quadro will serve you better and if you're doing gaming the GeForce will serve you better.  This is really an apples and oranges type of comparison, each card is good for what it was designed to do.
 
For basic editing the GeForce card should work just fine for you and the Quadro card may not perform as well.

That's good to know, since I just bought the Surface Book.
 

Remember that a higher resolution makes things smaller, not larger.  My home set up is three 27" 1920x1080 monitors.  Even with that I have my web browsers zoomed to 125%.

The icons are a little smaller than on my old Dell 17".

I'd think the PC designers would do whatever scaling is necessary to make everything the same size regardless of the resolution -- or at least offer that as an option to the user.
 

There is probably also a weight difference with the screen sizes.  I'd guess that the 17" screen laptop is probably at least two pounds more than the 13".  How often will you be carrying the machine around?

The P70 is about 7 lbs compared to 3.5 for the Surface Book. But given the estimated battery life, I imagine that the battery in the Surface Book is heavier than the one in the P70.

I really don't care about the weight. It will sit on a desk most of the time and when I travel, I keep it in a high quality rolling briefcase. I actually like it a little heavier on the desk.

Edited by Cynthia Moore, 01 May 2017 - 11:55 PM.

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